Guy Boyd goblets

Guy Boyd goblet set
made in Sydney, Australia 1950s

This is a really, really rare set of Guy Boyd goblets. The form of the vessel- the goblet- was only produced in very limited quantities. To find an original set [rather than re-create a set, one piece at a time] is also rare.

The Boyds are a famous Australian family of artists. Martin Boyd pottery started in Cremorne, Sydney in 1946- but Martin doesn’t exist, instead it was Guy [Martin] Boyd who was the chief ceramicist. The pottery was in operation from 1946-1964, with 1957-58 being the peak production period.

All Guy Boyd pottery is made [and signed] by hand so there is a slight variation between any pieces in a set. The pottery is instantly recognisable from the edge band of unglazed pottery that always separates the two toned pieces. The colours are quintessentially 50s.

This fabulous goblet set would be great for Christmas drinks! It is for sale: $AU75
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Martin Boyd 50s #powder pink

Martin Boyd pottery, 1950sMartin Boyd pottery
made in Sydney, Australia c.1950s

This collection of Martin Boyd showcases some of the pottery’s other well-known designs: to date on this blog I’ve only included the two-toned pottery pieces.

The two creamers that bookend the image illustrate the handpainted ‘Australiana’ themes that Boyd is famous for. The jug to the left sports a grass tree, and the jug on the extreme right shows a worker in a field of bamboo. Both jugs have the powder pink background which is so associated with Boyd pottery.

In the middle of the image is a crimson double cruet set with bamboo handle; the mustard pot is lidded. To the rear and front of the group are pieces with a ‘dot’ design – another classic popular in the 50s. The jug is the same pink colour as the other jugs, and the salt and pepper shakers are the same crimson as the cruet set.

All the pieces are in excellent condition, with the exception of the grass tree jug which has a small chip on the pouring lip. I debated whether to buy and show this piece, but the beautiful rendering of the grass tree won me over.

For sale: $AU150

50s ramekins

Martin Boyd ramekins [8]Martin Boyd ramekins
made in Australia 1957

The Boyds are a famous Australian family of artists. Martin Boyd pottery started in Cremorne, Sydney in 1946- but Martin doesn’t exist, instead it was Guy [Martin] Boyd who was the chief ceramicist. The pottery was in operation from 1946-1964, with 1957-58 being the peak production period.

All Martin Boyd pottery is made [and signed by hand] so there is a slight variation between any pieces in a set. The pottery is instantly recognisable from the edge band of unglazed pottery that always separates the two toned pieces. The colours are quintessentially 50s.

This set of eight ramekins is in excellent condition – it has never been used. The person I bought the set from told me they were her mothers who bought them new in 1957. She decided they were too lovely to ever be used for such a prosaic purpose as soup- and put them on display.

This set of Martin Boyd signed  ramekins is for sale: $AUD255

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50s souvenirware

Studio Anna and Martin Boyd jugStudio Anna pin dish, made in Sydney Australia c.1956
Martin Boyd jug, made in Sydney Australia c. 1954

I have posted quite a few Studio Anna and Martin Boyd pottery pieces on this blog- both very influential and now highly collectible potteries. Both potteries were pumping out souvenirware in the 50s- and this pin dish and jug are typical pieces of the time.

Warilla is a seaside suburb of Wollongong- famous for its- you guessed it – prawning. Studio Anna produced thousands of pin dishes in the 50s- for hundreds of coastal towns- so it was simply a matter of changing the town name. Meanwhile Martin Boyd pottery was pumping out stylized aboriginal motif pieces for the tourist trade.

Together these pieces made a nice vignette- but collectors- they are for sale: $AUD80

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Martin Boyd ramekins

Martin Boyd ramekins & saucersMartin Boyd ramekins made in Australia 1957 I have posted a set of Boyd ramekins previously, so look away now if you’ve read this before! The Boyds are a famous Australian family of artists. Martin Boyd pottery started in Cremorne, Sydney in 1946- but Martin doesn’t exist, instead it was Guy [Martin] Boyd who was the chief ceramicist. The pottery was in operation from 1946-1964, with 1957-58 being the peak production period. All Martin Boyd pottery is made [and signed by hand] so there is a slight variation between any pieces in a set. The pottery is instantly recognisable from the edge band of clear glaze that always separates the two toned pieces. The colours are quintessentially 50s. This set of six ramekins have matching saucers – which can be mixed and matched to suit your mood. For sale: $AUD285 Buy Now

Martin Boyd ramekins

Martin Boyd ramekinsMartin Boyd ramekins
made in Australia 1950s

The Boyds are a famous Australian family of artists. Martin Boyd was the ceramist in the family – and his pottery started in Cremorne, Sydney in 1946. The pottery was in operation from 1946-1964, with 1957-58 being the peak production period.

All Martin Boyd pottery is made [and signed] by hand so there is a slight variation between any pieces in a set. The pottery is instantly recognisable from the edge band of uncoloured glaze that always separates the two toned pieces. The colours are quintessentially 50s.

This set of four ramekins is in excellent condition – it has never been used. And if Boyd ramekins are your thing, I also have a set of six ramekins with their matching plates also posted on the blog.

This set of four ramekins is for sale: $AUD80

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Martin Boyd condiment pottery

Martin Boyd condiment pottery
made in Sydney, Australia c.1950s

This collection of Martin Boyd showcases some of the pottery’s other well-known designs: to date on this blog I’ve only included the two-toned pottery pieces.

The two cream jugs that bookend the image illustrate the handpainted ‘Australiana’ themes that Boyd is famous for. The jug to the left sports a grass tree, and the jug on the extreme right shows a worker in a field of bamboo. Both jugs have the beautiful pink background which is so associated with Boyd pottery.

In the middle of the image is a crimson double cruet set with bamboo handle; the mustard pot is lidded. To the rear and front of the group are pieces with a ‘dot’ design – another classic popular in the 50s. The jug is the same pink colour as the other jugs, and the salt and pepper shakers are the same crimson as the cruet set.

All the pieces are in excellent condition, with the exception of the grass tree jug which has a small chip on the pouring lip. I debated whether to buy and show this piece, but the beautiful rendering of the grass tree won me over.

For sale: $AUD150

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Martin Boyd tea and coffee mugs [sold]

Martin Boyd tea & coffee mugs
made in Australia c.1957

 Some more Martin Boyd pottery. These mugs are quite rare- whereas Boyd ramekins can still be had [subject of a couple of posts ago] it is much rarer to find mugs. The mugs have the Boyd trademark of the uncoloured rim separating the inner and outer glaze colour- which again are those classic 50s colours.

I don’t know the provenance of the mugs, as I do the ramekins, but they are in perfect condition and I suspect have never been used for the nefarious purpose for which they were made [would see tea and coffee stains after 50 years, surely?] All mugs have the usual ‘Martin Boyd’ signature in cursive script on the base.

For Boyd aficionados!  Or hipsters who value what they drink tea and coffee from.  For sale: $AUD125

Martin Boyd ramekins

Martin Boyd ramekins
made in Australia 1957

The Boyds are a famous Australian family of artists. Martin Boyd pottery started in Cremorne, Sydney in 1946- but Martin doesn’t exist, instead it was Guy [Martin] Boyd who was the chief ceramicist. The pottery was in operation from 1946-1964, with 1957-58 being the peak production period.

All Martin Boyd pottery is made [and signed] by hand so there is a slight variation between any piece in a set. The pottery is instantly recognisable from the edge band of unglazed pottery that always separates the two toned pieces. The colours are quintessentially 50s.

This set of eight ramekins is in excellent condition – it has never been used. The person I bought the set from told me they were her mother’s who bought them new in 1957. She decided they were too lovely to ever be used for such a prosaic purpose as soup- and put them on display.   For sale: $AUD255

Buy Now