Crystal Craft – gingham style [sold]

Crystal Craft spoon rest
made in Australia 1960s

Crystal Craft has become uber trendy for collectors: it is a resin-covered fabric that originated in Queensland in the 70s. This is a super 70s spoon rest- just look at the resin form and fabulous gingham pattern!

I can’t quite come at the passion some collectors have for Crystal Craft [being a child of the 70s and having had to live with it growing up] but younger collectors than I love it. I do like the gingham- and am devotee of this neat checkerboard design.

I have teamed the spoon rest with a Pyrex container of the same period, and an old bulb. The bulb is just for styling but the Pyrex container is available- I have collected this blue and a fabulous avocado green.

The gingham spoon rest is for sale: $AU12

retro Nordic glassware

iittala candlestick holders & Kosta Boda terrieriittala ‘Festivo’ candlesticks, made in Finland 1966
Kosta Boda Terrier sculpture, made in Sweden c1960s

Continuing my new love affair with retro Nordic glass, here are two pieces from the 60s.

The candlestick holders were designed by Timo Sarpaneva. The candlestick holders come in 1 ring [as in my image] up to 8 rings- and were designed in translucent and blue glass. [Incidentally, for the stylists amongst you- those are Ikea candles being displayed. Just saying.]

The Airedale terrier – designed by Bertil Vallien, was part of a ‘Zoo Line’ series of sculptural decorations. Sold as a paperweight or as a piece of stand-alone sculpture, these pieces are now quite collectible. Just saying.

The beautiful chunky glass looks fantastic next to a window, or as a table centrepiece. All pieces are in perfect nick.

This collection is for sale: $AUD115

Buy Now

Glass kitchen canisters

Glass kitchen canisters 1950sGlass kitchen canisters
made in Australia 1950s

Here is a selection of some of the glass kitchen canisters that I have collected for use in my kitchen: these are the ‘spares’. The thick, square glass canisters were originally filled with nuts or sugared almonds, and sold at Christmas time in the 50s and 60s. The plastic lids come in all manner of colours, and are still good and air-tight. So beautiful and functional!

I like that you can see how much sugar/flour/tea is left in the glass canisters, and now I associate red with ‘lentils’, blue with ‘couscous’, and green with ‘green tea’. This colour coding is a great idea!

I also have a selection of glass canisters with black bakelite lids- these only seemed to come in black- and they date earlier, probably the 40s.

The canisters are for sale: $AU20 [coloured plastic lids] and $AU30 [black bakelite lids.]

Vintage measuring jugs

Vintage measuring jugsVintage glass measuring jugs
made in Australia, 1930-1950s

I love a bit of vintage kitchenalia – and when you have three or more items of the same type/vintage they look great massed together in the contemporary kitchen. Add to that that these jugs are still good for their intended purpose – and equally good holding fruit or kitchen utensils or a bunch of flowers–and what’s not to love!

Glass measuring jugs were made during the Depression- glass being cheaper to manufacture than tin or steel. These jugs all measure 5 cups / 2 pints, with the graduated measurements cast in relief during the manufacturing process. There were often bubbles in the glass, and the visible seams in the jugs mark them out as being Depression glass. When buying vintage glass it’s important to check that the pouring lip and rim are entire- with no chips or scratches – especially if you intend using the piece in the kitchen.

These three jugs are in good condition, and are big enough to hold a pineapple. They are for sale: $AUD95

Buy Now

Vintage soda siphons

Vintage Australian soda siphonsSchweppes soda siphons,
made in Sydney, c.1948-1950

These lovely soda bottles are very collectible and all have etched & faceted glass– such a deal of detail just for soda water! Because the soda bottles are so highly prized they have been well researched and described – there is a wealth of information about them – which allows them to be accurately dated.

The glass bottles don’t photograph too well on my timber background, but if you click on the image and zoom in you can see the intricate glass etchings to the bottles.

All three bottles are etched: ‘Schweppes, [Australia] Ltd, 30 Fl Oz Soda Water’ and were one of the first soda bottles to have a plastic and metal top. I’ve seen all sorts of upcycling with siphon bottles, but for my money, I think they look great massed together on a bar, or near a window where light picks up the fantastic etching.

This collection is for sale: $AUD125

Buy Now

70s orange [sold]

Krups kitchen scales, made in Ireland c.1970s
Pyrex mixing bowl, made in USA c. 1970s

Ah the 70s when orange ruled supreme! I can’t but associate anything oldish and orangish with the 70s.

I have a rather large collection of retro kitchen scales. So far I have posted Australian scales [Salter -50s and Persinware-60s] but the collection also includes these lovely metal scales made in Ireland in the 70s. Scales are both functional and beautiful – which is why I love ‘em; I’ve seen them used for their original intention [weighing stuff] but also they make great book ends and fruit bowls. Just as long as the measuring bowl is intact [and one must make sure it’s the original bowl as well.]

These scales weigh items up to 10 lbs in 1 ounce increments, or 4.5kg by 25 grams- so are good for most of the world whether imperial or metric. The scales are orange enamel and the plastic bowl is a great elongated oval shape- again, very 70s.

The Pyrex mixing bowl features a great orange pattern- I’m sure Pyrex aficionados could identify the pattern name.  The mixing bowl also functions well as a fruit bowl.

I like the scales and the bowl together- bonded in their orangeness and their 70s-ness.

This set is for sale: $AUD80

Studio glass paperweights

60s studio glass paperweightsStudio glass paperweights
made in Australia, c. 1960s

These two paperweights show the 60s fascination with the ‘controlled bubbles’ glass technique. Controlled bubbles turned up in objects as diverse as vases, ashtrays and objects de art.  And paperweights.

Paperweights seem slightly redundant in these days of the ‘paperless’ office. But how lovely do these studio glass pieces look backlit on the windowsill? The pig paperweight has a deep blue interior and graduated bubbles and the round paperweight has a deep red interior and random bubbles. Click on the image for a larger view and admire the colours and bubbles!

Both pieces are unsigned, which is not unusual in art pieces of the 60s, but I have it on good authority that the pieces are Australian. Murano glass in Italy, and art glass makers in France, Britain and America were all producing controlled bubbled pieces in the 60s.

There are many paperweight collectors out there [check out www.paperweight.org] and museums dedicated to collecting and exhibiting paperweights. From the Paperweight Collectors Association I learnt that there are three periods of paperweight collecting:

The Classic Period [1840-1880] – mostly French made
The Folk Art Period [1880-1940] and
The Contemporary Period [1940 to present]

A very venerable history! These two very collectible paperweights are for sale: $AUD105

Buy Now

50s Australian glassware

Australian glassware, 1950sAustralian glassware
made in 1950s

I am a huge fan of Australian glassware: and collect it when I can.

Here we have:
tri-pouring graduated ½ pint jug [pours from three sides]
Kodak developing chemical graduated glass
and seven medicine graduated glasses.

All pieces were made rough-and-ready; several have ‘bubbles’ in the glass, and evident seam lines. But no chips or cracks- all these lovely glasses can be used today for their original – or indeed – new purposes.

Because that’s what glass is like. Unlike plastic, it does not allow molecular transfer – so when heated or filled with foodstuffs or chemicals- there is no movement between the two.

And being made in the 50s- all the graduated measurements are imperial; in relief in the glass, or transfer printed. A lovely snap-shot of Australian glassware.

This set of Australian glassware is for sale: $AU95

Buy Now

Royal visit glasses

Royal visit glasses [Australia, 1954]Royal visit glasses
made in Australia, 1954

Not difficult to gauge the age of these glasses: they are printed on them. Her Majesty visited the colonies in 1954 – a year after her coronation in 1953.

Australia is still a part of the Commonwealth, with her Maj as our Queen. We had a referendum to become a republic in 1999 – it was defeated – and the debate still rages.

So- all this is to say- there are a lot – A LOT- of monarchists in our midst. Monarchists who collect ER memorabilia. Here we have two shot glasses, and a pair of drinking glasses. The drinking glasses have had more wear [more toasts!] and some of the gilt is worn. The shot glasses, meanwhile, look pristine.

Just saying; monarchists prefer to toast her Maj with beer, rather than vodka. It’s empirical!

The Royal Visit glasses are for sale: $AU55

Buy Now

60s goodness

Pyrex 'Sunburst' flask, Bessemer printed plate, 60sBessemer plate, made in Australia 1965-70
Pyrex ‘Sunburst’ flask jug, made in USA 1960s

This is Pyrex at its best- a jug modelled on a laboratory flask with an ‘atomic’ sunburst pattern in gold. The stopper is graduated plastic, in good old yellow plastic. The jug has a pouring lip, two litre capacity and being Pyrex, is good for hot and cold liquids. Pyrex is very collectible – and the jug is in excellent condition. And –it makes a terrific vase when it’s not serving hot and cold liquids.

The Bessemer plate is likewise very collectable. It is one of a series of six, designed by A. Wiederkehr – and is culturalyl important enough to be in the Powerhouse Museum collection. I would have loved to have collected all six- but alas- after so long hunting I have only found this one ‘in the wild’ [as collectors say.] I have found plenty of plates, of all the patterns – but they are invariably so scratched from use that I rejected purchasing.

If you are a Pyrex collector [and there are quite a few!] or a Bessemer collector, please check out the other items on my blog. I am a big fan of early 60s industrial designers – and Pyrex and Bessemer tick all the boxes!

The flask and plate are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU45

Buy Now