50s Australian glassware

Australian glassware, 1950sAustralian glassware
made in 1950s

I am a huge fan of Australian glassware: and collect it when I can.

Here we have:
tri-pouring graduated ½ pint jug [pours from three sides]
Kodak developing chemical graduated glass
and seven medicine graduated glasses.

All pieces were made rough-and-ready; several have ‘bubbles’ in the glass, and evident seam lines. But no chips or cracks- all these lovely glasses can be used today for their original – or indeed – new purposes.

Because that’s what glass is like. Unlike plastic, it does not allow molecular transfer – so when heated or filled with foodstuffs or chemicals- there is no movement between the two.

And being made in the 50s- all the graduated measurements are imperial; in relief in the glass, or transfer printed. A lovely snap-shot of Australian glassware.

This set of Australian glassware is for sale: $AU95

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Royal visit glasses

Royal visit glasses [Australia, 1954]Royal visit glasses
made in Australia, 1954

Not difficult to gauge the age of these glasses: they are printed on them. Her Majesty visited the colonies in 1954 – a year after her coronation in 1953.

Australia is still a part of the Commonwealth, with her Maj as our Queen. We had a referendum to become a republic in 1999 – it was defeated – and the debate still rages.

So- all this is to say- there are a lot – A LOT- of monarchists in our midst. Monarchists who collect ER memorabilia. Here we have two shot glasses, and a pair of drinking glasses. The drinking glasses have had more wear [more toasts!] and some of the gilt is worn. The shot glasses, meanwhile, look pristine.

Just saying; monarchists prefer to toast her Maj with beer, rather than vodka. It’s empirical!

The Royal Visit glasses are for sale: $AU55

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60s goodness

Pyrex 'Sunburst' flask, Bessemer printed plate, 60sBessemer plate, made in Australia 1965-70
Pyrex ‘Sunburst’ flask jug, made in USA 1960s

This is Pyrex at its best- a jug modelled on a laboratory flask with an ‘atomic’ sunburst pattern in gold. The stopper is graduated plastic, in good old yellow plastic. The jug has a pouring lip, two litre capacity and being Pyrex, is good for hot and cold liquids. Pyrex is very collectible – and the jug is in excellent condition. And –it makes a terrific vase when it’s not serving hot and cold liquids.

The Bessemer plate is likewise very collectable. It is one of a series of six, designed by A. Wiederkehr – and is culturalyl important enough to be in the Powerhouse Museum collection. I would have loved to have collected all six- but alas- after so long hunting I have only found this one ‘in the wild’ [as collectors say.] I have found plenty of plates, of all the patterns – but they are invariably so scratched from use that I rejected purchasing.

If you are a Pyrex collector [and there are quite a few!] or a Bessemer collector, please check out the other items on my blog. I am a big fan of early 60s industrial designers – and Pyrex and Bessemer tick all the boxes!

The flask and plate are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU45

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Art glass paperweights

Studio glass paperweights, 1960sStudio glass paperweights, made in Australia, c1960s

These three paperweights show the 60s fascination with the ‘controlled bubbles’ glass technique. Controlled bubbles turned up in objects as diverse as vases, ashtrays and objects de art. And paperweights.

Paperweights seem slightly redundant in these days of the ‘paperless’ office. [nb: my drawing office is anything BUT paperless!] But the art glass pieces look fantastic back-lit on a windowsill, or as here- against a white wall. Click on the image for a larger view and admire the colours and bubbles!

All three pieces are unsigned, which is not unusual in art pieces of the 60s, but I have it on good authority that the pieces are Australian. There are many paperweight collectors out there [check out www.paperweight.org] and museums dedicated to collecting and exhibiting paperweights. From the Paperweight Collectors Association I learnt that there are three periods of paperweight collecting:

The Classic Period [1840-1880] – mostly French made paperweights
The Folk Art Period [1880-1940] and
The Contemporary Period [1940 to present.]

A very venerable history! This set of collectible paperweights is for sale: $AUD125

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#60sstyle

60s style: kiwi, moneybox, inkwellCrystal Craft kiwi, made in New Zealand 1960s
State Bank money box, made in Australia 1960s
Glass inkwell, made in England 1960s.

60s- style from around the world.

The Kiwi is made by Crystal Craft, and features marine opal and brass legs & beak – the makers sticker in-tact on the back; the State Bank money box is metal and exhibits the logo of the 60s [founded in 1933 as the Rural Bank, the State Bank became the Commonwealth Bank in 2000.] The glass inkwell is an import from England, maker unknown.

All different items, made from different materials, and hailing from different countries but unified by date [and collectability] – and what a nice little tableau they make!

Crystal Craft has become uber collectable; money-box collectors are legend; and there is a society of inkwell fanciers.

All are for sale at $AU15 each, or $AU35 the lot.

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Koala canisters

Kraft koala canistersKraft koala canisters
made in Australia 1980s

More glass kitchen canisters! These are made by Kraft, and are in the shape of koalas. Originally sold with Vegemite or Peanut Butter, the form of the koala is much more apparently when the glass is filled with any kitchen food stuff [lentils spring to mind- only because they seem so hipsterish- as two of the koalas – with the red lids- are knitting.]

These canisters were made in the 80s; they have plastic lids [which are still air-tight and good for storing stuff]; canisters made in the 60s and early 70s had metal lids which weren’t so practical for re-use. Like the canisters below, the lids came in all manner of colours to make it easy to tell the jars apart. And they came in two sizes: as here, where we have one smaller size and two of the larger size.

The set of three canisters are for sale: $AU75

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Glass kitchen canisters

Glass kitchen canisters 1950sGlass kitchen canisters
made in Australia 1950s

Here is a selection of some of the glass kitchen canisters that I have collected for use in my kitchen: these are the ‘spares’. The thick, square glass canisters were originally filled with nuts or sugared almonds, and sold at Christmas time in the 50s and 60s. The plastic lids come in all manner of colours, and are still good and air-tight. So beautiful and functional!

I like that you can see how much sugar/flour/tea is left in the glass canisters, and now I associate red with ‘lentils’, blue with ‘couscous’, and green with ‘green tea’. This colour coding is a great idea!

I also have a selection of glass canisters with black bakelite lids- these only seemed to come in black- and they date earlier, probably the 40s.

The canisters are for sale: $AU20 [coloured plastic lids] and $AU30 [black bakelite lids.]

Pyrex Agee [sold]

Pyrex Agee 3" condiment bowlsPyrex Agee ‘Coloured Pyrex’ 3” bowls
made in Australia 1952-1959.

How collectable is Pyrex right now? Crazy collectable, that’s how! I had been quietly collecting the ‘Coloured Pyrex’ series for a while: I like the harlequin colours, the stackability and use in the kitchen. They come in three sizes [3”, 5” and 7”] and six colours. I had an oversupply of green 3” condiment bowls so posted them for sale. They were quite literally- snapped up.

The ‘Agee’ was Pyrex manufactured in Australia. These 3” condiment bowls are stamped “PR 234, Agee Pyrex, Made in Australia” on the base. And that’s another thing to look for: Pyrex colours that have deteriorated after being in a dishwasher- or a Pyrex bowl that has done heavy duty and has colour worn from the base. The interior of the Agee is glass; the colour is applied to the exterior, so it’s food grade – and so if any wear happens, it happens to the exterior base.

These beauties are in excellent condition, with no wear. And a fantastic green to boot.

This set of 3 green condiment bowls sold for $AU25

Christmas kitchen canisters

Kitchen canisters, 1960sKitchen canisters
made in Australia 1960s

I’ve posted an image of our kitchen previously: I have been collecting these glass canisters FOREVER. I like them because you can see what food stuff is contained within: and because they were made in the 50s the glass is thick and the seal is strong. These canisters can be repurposed to contain anything that needs an air-tight seal.

I also like the canisters because my partner’s family actually bought them – every Christmas- filled with sugared almonds or salted nuts. So she has an association with them too. Now our kitchen is replete with them.

The lids were made in bakelite up until the 50s – then – every colour of plastic lid was used. This is especially helpful now in the kitchen: as I associate flour with red, baking soda with yellow, sugar with green…

I have several here in Christmas colours. The glamour! The five canisters are for sale: $AU100

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BODA decanter

BODA decanter, 1971BODA decanter
made in Sweden 1971

We’ve all heard of Kosta Boda, the famous Swedish glass manufacturer that is now very collectable. This decanter was made by BODA, which only became part of the Afors group in 1971. In 1976 the brand became Kosta Boda – which dates this decanter to between 1971 and 1976.

The decanter is made of a sienna-coloured glass, with transparent glass handle. It has its original label intact:

BODA
Afors Bruk
SWEDEN

[I couldn’t replicate the 70s font here – zoom in for a fantastic look at that label!]

This is one for the serious collectors. The decanter is in fabulous vintage condition, with no issues whatsoever. It has an off-centre pontil mark. And did I mention it has its label intact?

The BODA decanter is for sale: $AU95

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