Pudding bowls

Fowler Ware pudding bowls,
made in Australia 1940s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This image shows the range of colours and sizes the pudding bowls were made in – and other posts evidence the rest! [I have collected a number of Fowler Ware pudding bowls….] The bowls and are still fit for purpose : I received a lovely christmas pudding made in one of these bowls- and after eating the pudding – I got to keep the bowl!

The large crimson and medium grey bowl are for sale : $AUD25 & $AU15 [or $30 for the pair.]

Buy Now

Split cane hat rack

Split cane hat rack, 1940sSplit cane hat rack
made in Australia 1940s

This is a superb example of split cane – a hat rack employing a complex interlacing of cane members with six hooks for six hats. The rack was made in the 40s so there is a bit of wear to the once shiny cane; I like the patina it has developed but you might want to re-varnish it; totally up to you.

Split cane became very fashionable in the 40s in Australia and furniture from the small – magazine rack- to the large- entire sofa suites was made from it. Australian cane has quite a distinctive dark spotty appearance which makes it very attractive; other cane tends to be more monochrome.

One of the hat hooks has sagged a little- giving the rack an asymmetrical appearance which I think is kinda nice. The cane is in excellent condition and the hook could be steamed and re-formed to its original shape if desired. The hat rack is ready to hang.

The hack rack is for sale: $AUD125

Buy Now

60s jigsaws

60s jigsaws
made in Australia

Two delightful jigsaws, made from timber, in Australia in the 60s. The first was made by Louise Rayner Toys; the second – a teaching clock, is unmarked. Both jigsaws came from a nursery school, who purchased them in the 60s but now deemed them too ‘old-fashioned’ for today’s children. So – hello – retro!

I do remember playing with a clock jigsaw when I was at nursery school- the plastic handles are adjustable and have to be moved in order to get all the pieces in. And I just love the funky glasses on the coloured jigsaw- which is very ‘analogue’ with a clock and a rotary telephone!

Both jigsaws are in excellent vintage condition; with very little wear and are for sale: $AU45

Buy Now

Red bakelite s&p

Bakelite salt and pepper shakers
made by Marquis, Nally, Eon in Australia, c.1940s

I have previously posted bakelite salt and pepper shakers – twice- first in a grouping of green examples and then in a grouping of multi-coloured examples. Here we have a collection of red s&p. They were made to be included in the picnic basket- an everyday object made in a newly-developed plastic- that wouldn’t break in the great outdoors.

I am very fond of the ingenious design of the first two shakers – the top and bottom separate to reveal the two shakers; and you can see that the screw-on bases were often different coloured bakelite. These shakers were made by Marquis; and are impressed with ‘cat 729’.

The next pair of shakers were made by Nally: they are quite distinctive with black bakelite screw lids; and the last set of shakers- although not marked, are by Eon.

For bakelite collectors, and salt and pepper shaker collectors- you know who you are!

For sale: $AUD115

Buy Now

50s Australian glassware

Australian glassware, 1950sAustralian glassware
made in 1950s

I am a huge fan of Australian glassware: and collect it when I can.

Here we have:
tri-pouring graduated ½ pint jug [pours from three sides]
Kodak developing chemical graduated glass
and seven medicine graduated glasses.

All pieces were made rough-and-ready; several have ‘bubbles’ in the glass, and evident seam lines. But no chips or cracks- all these lovely glasses can be used today for their original – or indeed – new purposes.

Because that’s what glass is like. Unlike plastic, it does not allow molecular transfer – so when heated or filled with foodstuffs or chemicals- there is no movement between the two.

And being made in the 50s- all the graduated measurements are imperial; in relief in the glass, or transfer printed. A lovely snap-shot of Australian glassware.

This set of Australian glassware is for sale: $AU95

Buy Now

Royal visit glasses

Royal visit glasses [Australia, 1954]Royal visit glasses
made in Australia, 1954

Not difficult to gauge the age of these glasses: they are printed on them. Her Majesty visited the colonies in 1954 – a year after her coronation in 1953.

Australia is still a part of the Commonwealth, with her Maj as our Queen. We had a referendum to become a republic in 1999 – it was defeated – and the debate still rages.

So- all this is to say- there are a lot – A LOT- of monarchists in our midst. Monarchists who collect ER memorabilia. Here we have two shot glasses, and a pair of drinking glasses. The drinking glasses have had more wear [more toasts!] and some of the gilt is worn. The shot glasses, meanwhile, look pristine.

Just saying; monarchists prefer to toast her Maj with beer, rather than vodka. It’s empirical!

The Royal Visit glasses are for sale: $AU55

Buy Now

Wiltshire ‘Burgundy’ coffee & tea set

Wilshire 'Burgundy' coffee & tea set [Australia, 1972]Wiltshire ‘Burgundy’ tea & coffee set
made in Australia 1972

This great retro set of coffee pot, teapot, creamer and serving tray has a funky shape, satin finish to the 18/8 stainless steel and a fantastic embossed pattern. It was produced in 1972, and the Burgundy pattern extended to serving ware too: sugar bowl, sauce boat, salad bowl & servers, salt and pepper shakers and cutlery.

I have collected the matching cutlery too. I am a sucker for good Australian design! [For evidence, see blog posts below.]

In researching the history of the Wiltshire ‘Burgundy’ I came across an original advertisement for it in the Sydney Morning Herald– this was the must have service of the 70s. Anecdotally, everyone I speak to remembers this set being in their beach shack- it has a ‘holiday house’ vibe.

BUT- the best part of this collecting story: this tea & coffee set came from an order of Nuns who donated it to the second-hand shop I bought it from: apparently they hadn’t used it since it was given them in the 70s and had decided- forty years later- to clear their cupboards. I love the idea of Nuns being given funky 70s stainless steel and deciding instead to go with their English china.

The Burgundy tea and coffee set is for sale: $AU105
The Burgundy cutlery is also in superb condition- it doesn’t look like it’s been used; and it’s for sale: $AUD75 [place setting for 6; 18 pieces.]

Buy Now

Golfing tee-spoons

Silver plated 'golf club' teaspoons, Australia, 1960sSilver plated ‘golf club’ teaspoons
made in Australia 1960s

I’ve researched these silver teaspoons, with their distinctive golf club finials- they are engraved with ‘CCC’. As near as I can tell, this would be Campbelltown Catholic Club, a golf club in – you guessed it- Campbelltown.

The set of six spoons are hallmarked for silver plate, made in Australia, in the 60s. They would suit a golf tragic or any golfing collector. So far I feel I have been of service to the golfing tragics- I have featured champagne flutes from the 50s [won in a golf tournament]; novelty glasses with golfing cartoons from the 40s, novelty plates with golfing cartoons from the 50s, golfing nip glasses from the 50s [where the level of alchol is measured thus: 2 over, 1 over, Birdie, Eagle], a Barbie doll complete with her golfing accoutrements, and – a hallmarked silver cup inscribed: “Selangor Golf Club Services Trophy 1958, Winners D.C. Hurst & L.M. Riedel” on a bakelite base.

I myself am not a golf tragic [I don’t have the patience/will power/co-ordination required.] But I know there are plenty of people who are.

The set of teaspoons came in this box, but it’s clearly not the original [it’s marked ‘Made in England’.]  The set is for sale: $AU60 [box included for shipping purposes.]

Buy Now

Purple reign!

Purple costume brooches, 50s, AustraliaPurple costume jewellery
made in Australia, 1950s

These are large, 50s costume brooches: all with atomic stylings and all featuring purple glass. They were made to make a bold statement – and I think you’ll agree they are still making quite the bold statement!

50s jewellery went out of fashion for a period in the 70s and 80s but is now retro enough to be coming back with a splash. I have always loved purple and collected these brooches one at a time until I had a triumvirate to display/offer them as a group.

The brooches would look great worn singly- but wow! would pack a punch worn altogether. They are all in great vintage condition, and are offered for sale: $75

Buy Now

Yarn Winder

Yarn Winder, made in Australia 1960sYarn Winder
made in Australia, 1960s

This yarn winder- new in box- was manufactured by Silver, and made in the 60s. It comes with a table-fixing clamp, and yarn guide and the original operating instructions. The winder has a pink metal base [powder pink] and the internal winding mechanism and winder are all metal. For all your yarn winding needs!

Okay, so few of us wind yarn now-a-days; but there are lots of sewing/knitting paraphernalia collectors who would love this winder. It’s never been used and it’s rare to find one in its original box. The box has some wear [see image] but the winder itself is as new.

The winder is for sale: $AU45

Buy Now