Kookaburra teaset

Noritake kookaburra teasetNoritake kookaburra teaset
made in Japan c.1933

Have I mentioned that kookaburras are very collectible right now? Perhaps once or twice!

This delightful set of teapot, creamer and cake plate was made in 1933- as evidenced by the design of the Noritake backstamp. The backstamp also indicates the pieces were “exclusively made for the Commonwealth of Australia market” – this fascinating information found on the Noritake website.

It seems kookaburras were highly sought after in the 1930s too. On this set, the kookaburras are paired on one side of the piece, and single on the other. They are all handpainted, and quite delightful.

All pieces are in pristine condition.

This set is for sale: $155

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60s browny goodness

Graham Kerr lazy susan, Vogue plate, Mikasa jugGraham Kerr lazy susan, made in New Zealand, c.1960s
Vogue patterned melamine plate, made in Australia c.1960s
Mikasa jug, made in Japan, c.1960s

And now for something a little different- a collection of items connected by colour, and age.

You may remember the Galloping Gourmet, Graham Kerr? The original TV Masterchef. It not, then perhaps this quote from the introduction to one of his cookbooks from 1971 might jog your memory:

“To millions he was TV’s clumsily ingratiating Galloping Gourmet, a master of sauces and saucy innuendo…”

He seems to have also produced a line in timber veneer lazy susans, to which he added his name in fancy gold script. This lazy susan still works a treat- they made sturdy ball bearings in the 60s. It would be great to have it in the centre of one’s dining table, holding saucy-sauces for your dining companions’ pleasure!

The Vogue plate is a ‘squircle’- a round-edged square shape and it features a lovely abstract composition of cooking paraphernalia. And the lovely caramel/two-toned jug by Mikasa [“oven to table to dishwasher”, #c4800] completes the collection.

A lovely trio of browny-60s goodness. This set is for sale: $AUD65

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Minette slide viewer

Minette 35mm slide viewer
Minato Shokai Co, made in Japan, c.1950s

OK! Ok. Another slide viewer. But we all have slides to view. Or is it just me?

This viewer is just SO cute. Look how small it is…it’s a Minette. The kewpie doll is bigger than the viewer, and she carries a slide under her arm for scale.

And totally weirdly, like every other time I have bought a slide projector or a viewer, the Minette comes with a slide of its last owner…this time it’s an echtochrome slide of a woman on grass shading her eyes from the camera. Ms Kewpie is modelling that slide.

For sale: $AUD55 [please indicate if you’d like Kewpie and the slide included.]

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Sellex canister set

Selex canister setSellex bakelite kitchen canister set
made in Australia c. 1940s

I have posted Sellex canisters previously – but this is an entire set, which is now rare to find. It’s a transfer label, white bakelite set consisting of Flour, Tea, Sugar, Rice and Sago. The Tea label has now been lost- probably due to over-use..but you notice the Sago label is still going strong….I’m just saying.

These canisters would look great in a monochrome white modernist kitchen.

This delicious creamy-white, hard-worn bakelite canister set is for sale; $AUD95

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50s botanica

Gambit ware leaf platesGambit Ware ‘Australiana’ leaf plates
made in Australia 1950s

Here is another part of my collection: anything botanically themed always gets me in. Add to that these plates were designed and made in Australia- celebrating our unique flora in the post war period. AND this is ‘ceramique’ – an early melamine material, that was developed to revolutionise ceramic – it would ‘never chip or break.’

The stylised plates came in simple pastel colours, but were quite botanically detailed- they include wattle, banksia, kurrajong, mulga leaves- to name a few. Each leaf shape has its name on the underside, should you fail to recognise these iconic shapes. The simple colouring meant that each leaf shape was reproduced in six colours- so one could buy a set of six ‘for display OR kitchen purposes’!

This image shows about half of my collection- at last count I had 20 plates. Plates with their labels intact are worth significantly more. The ceramique has certainly lived up to its name- there isn’t a chip or a crack on any of the plates, although colour fading has occurred on a few.

Kitschy – yes. But 50s Australian kitsch- I love it.

Hanstan coffee pot

Hanstan coffee pot & mugs
made in Australia, 1970s

Hanstan pottery was a collaboration between Hans Wright and Stan Burrage – hence Hanstan- that started in Victoria in 1962. The pottery continued to make domestic ware pottery well into the 1980s. Hanstan collectors will know that the pottery is always two-tone: either matt white and mission brown, or 70s orange and misson brown. The brown part of the pottery is rough glazed to contrast with the smooth slip glaze of the other colour.

The coffee pot, collectors will also know – is now quite rare and hard to find. I have had the mugs and the matching sugar bowl for some time, and the coffee pot, completing the set, has only just been found. All pieces are in excellent vintage condition; the coffee pot is completely unstained and looks like it’s never been used.

I also have examples of Hanstan white/brown pottery- spice jars and a salt pig – elsewhere on this blog.

The Hanstan coffee set is for sale: $AU125

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SylvaC

SylvaC terrier dog
made in England 1960-1979

An exciting find! I often buy small figurines to ‘style’ my photos- to provide scale and context.

I picked up this terrier figurine; and then when researching it to add to my post discovered it is by SylvaC, model 1378. As I have collected, and showcased SylvaC figurines before, I was intrigued.

The post was supposed to showcase the Gambit Ware ‘Mulga’ leaf pate, by Ceramique: an early melamine material that was developed in Australia to revolutionise ceramic – it would ‘never chip or break.’ I have collected a whole of Gambit Ware – because I am a landscape architect, interested in Australian flora- and have collected every piece I have come across.

The stylised plates came in simple pastel colours, but are quite botanically detailed- they include wattle, banksia, kurrajong, acacia leaves- to name a few. The simple colouring meant that each leaf shape was reproduced in six colours- so one could buy a set of six ‘for display OR kitchen purposes’!

So- what to showcase? The SylvaC terrier or the Gambit Ware Mulga plate?

The SylvaC terrier is for sale: $AU25

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30s sugar canister

30s sugar canisterSugar canister
made in Australia, 1930s

A wonderful example of a depression era canister – this aluminium sugar canister evidences all the hallmarks of the 30s- drilled, green bakelite handles, mismatched green tones, applied ‘Sugar’ label, and graduated rings to the cream base.

Anodised aluminium was in its infancy- and achieving colour matching next to impossible. So each green lid was slightly different across the whole set of five canisters [and added to this of course, is colour fading over time.] Meanwhile bakelite technology was forty years old- you could get any colour you wanted there.

The size of this canister tells you something about the storage of sugar in the 40s. This canister was second in size only to the Flour canister. Everything else in the series was smaller: Suet, Rice, Tea and coming up last, Coffee. My how things have changed in the modern world! [Coffee should always be the largest!- and what the hell is suet?]

The canister has a few dings due to age, but the anodised aluminium base and lid are in good condition. The canister is for sale: $AUD45

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70s orange [sold]

Krups kitchen scales, made in Ireland c.1970s
Pyrex mixing bowl, made in USA c. 1970s

Ah the 70s when orange ruled supreme! I can’t but associate anything oldish and orangish with the 70s.

I have a rather large collection of retro kitchen scales. So far I have posted Australian scales [Salter -50s and Persinware-60s] but the collection also includes these lovely metal scales made in Ireland in the 70s. Scales are both functional and beautiful – which is why I love ‘em; I’ve seen them used for their original intention [weighing stuff] but also they make great book ends and fruit bowls. Just as long as the measuring bowl is intact [and one must make sure it’s the original bowl as well.]

These scales weigh items up to 10 lbs in 1 ounce increments, or 4.5kg by 25 grams- so are good for most of the world whether imperial or metric. The scales are orange enamel and the plastic bowl is a great elongated oval shape- again, very 70s.

The Pyrex mixing bowl features a great orange pattern- I’m sure Pyrex aficionados could identify the pattern name.  The mixing bowl also functions well as a fruit bowl.

I like the scales and the bowl together- bonded in their orangeness and their 70s-ness.

This set is for sale: $AUD80

Swinnertons Chelsea Blue

Swinnertons Chelsea Blue crockerySwinnertons Chelsea Blue
made in Staffordshire, England c.1950s

This set comprises 4 dinner plates, 4 side plates and 4 cake plates. The colour is described as ‘duck egg blue’.

I had been hunting for the matching Chelsea Blue coffee and tea sets, but upon reflecting how lovely the harlequin crockery sets are [see for example Swinnertons Nestor Vellum ‘Moonglo’ sets, below] I can’t actually imagine having a set all one colour.

Also, for some unexplained reason, the Chelsea Blue jug looks so wrong with the rest of the set- it is overblown, and has some quasi-20s affectations…what were they thinking? This is the 50s, people! I couldn’t bring myself to buy it – and left it on the shelf- which was probably a first for me.

This would be a good starter set for a harlequin table setting for 8 – just collect similar 50s colours in the same simple, rounded forms. Or just use as is – how good would cake look on those duck egg blue plates!

For sale: $AUD120

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