Shaving mugs

Keel Street Pottery [KSP] shaving mugs, made in England c.1900-1930s
Koala shaving mug, made in Australia, c.1930-1940s.

Shaving mugs are highly collectible and becomingly increasingly hard to find.

The ceramic ‘woodgrain’ finish shaving mugs [woodgrain- presumably to render the pottery more ‘manly’?] by KSP predate the pastel colours of the 50s, and yet anticipate those very colours. Yes, now I am certain the woodgrain would help with the whole manly act of shaving. The pink, yellow, & green shaving mugs are all in perfect condition, and marked ‘KSP, made in England’ on the underside.

By contrast, the blue shaving mug is made in Australia by Koala. Koala pottery had a short run, and produced- as far as I can tell- only shaving mugs. I would love if the shaving mug had a koala’s face on it, but alas, it’s a purely perfunctory item, other than that cool blue colour.  It’s also in tip-top condition.

The four mugs are for sale: $AUD100

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Christmas decorations #hipsterstyle

Knitted Christmas baubles, c 2013Hipster Christmas decorations
made in Sydney, Australia 2013

How cool are these Christmas baubles? Hand-knitted – in pure Australian wool-  these decorations will lend your Christmas tree some real hipster cred.

Made by a lovely Nanna using a 1970 knitting pattern, this set of 20 baubles is both environmentally sustainable and – quite hilarious. Environmentally sustainable because she used her left over wool pieces, and hilarious because she used her left over wool pieces [~not so much the red and green or tinselly colours.]

You’ve seen the urban art of knitted wraps around trees and poles – now see the knitted Christmas decorations! Christmas just got 1970 crafty!

The set of 20 [all different] Christmas baubles is for sale: $AUD40.   Buy now for Christmas!

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Vintage measuring jugs

Vintage measuring jugsVintage glass measuring jugs
made in Australia, 1930-1950s

I love a bit of vintage kitchenalia – and when you have three or more items of the same type/vintage they look great massed together in the contemporary kitchen. Add to that that these jugs are still good for their intended purpose – and equally good holding fruit or kitchen utensils or a bunch of flowers–and what’s not to love!

Glass measuring jugs were made during the Depression- glass being cheaper to manufacture than tin or steel. These jugs all measure 5 cups / 2 pints, with the graduated measurements cast in relief during the manufacturing process. There were often bubbles in the glass, and the visible seams in the jugs mark them out as being Depression glass. When buying vintage glass it’s important to check that the pouring lip and rim are entire- with no chips or scratches – especially if you intend using the piece in the kitchen.

These three jugs are in good condition, and are big enough to hold a pineapple. They are for sale: $AUD95

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Kelco espresso set ‘Tulip’

Kelco espresso set 'Tulip'Kelco espresso set
made in Japan, c.1960s

This charming espresso set of six cups and saucers comes in its original box: it’s never been used.

Largardo Tackett designed this set for Kelco – for the 60s European market. It’s called ‘Tulip’ [pattern K-41] and features abstract tulip shapes. I’ve seen the set in reds, blues and black and white…but I like this orange set the best. They weren’t shy about colour in the 60s, and the orange has been repeated on the saucer.

I’ve posted Kelco before…I am drawn to the simple, modernist shaping and the strong colours.

The espresso set would brighten a modern, monochrome kitchen and lend a certain retro aesthetic to the dining table. The set is for sale: $AUD85

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Vintage soda siphons

Vintage Australian soda siphonsSchweppes soda siphons,
made in Sydney, c.1948-1950

These lovely soda bottles are very collectible and all have etched & faceted glass– such a deal of detail just for soda water! Because the soda bottles are so highly prized they have been well researched and described – there is a wealth of information about them – which allows them to be accurately dated.

The glass bottles don’t photograph too well on my timber background, but if you click on the image and zoom in you can see the intricate glass etchings to the bottles.

All three bottles are etched: ‘Schweppes, [Australia] Ltd, 30 Fl Oz Soda Water’ and were one of the first soda bottles to have a plastic and metal top. I’ve seen all sorts of upcycling with siphon bottles, but for my money, I think they look great massed together on a bar, or near a window where light picks up the fantastic etching.

This collection is for sale: $AUD125

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Smiths Ringers

Smiths RingersRetro kitchen timers
Smiths Ringers, made in England, 1940s,1950s, 1960s

Perhaps I should have styled these three ‘ringers’ chronologically- as it is, the green ringer is bakelite and steel, with a glass cover- circa 1940, the middle ringer is the youngest- a mere slip of a thing from the 60s – brown coated metal, and the last, red ringer is all plastic- from the 1950s.

Each ringer is somewhat redolent of its age. I do like the fact that the 60s ringer is called ‘Ringer Girl’- if only the other two had similarly inspired names. All the ringers have different bell sounds- naturally- and due to their age and hard working life, are more suited as objects of beauty, rather than function. The green bakelite is a little faded, the brown metal is a little rusted in parts- as you’d expect from vintage items.

The ‘lemon’ tray lends a stylistic note to the image- but if you’d like to have it along with the ringers- let me know. This set is for sale: $AUD95

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Knitting gauges

Knitting gaugesKnitting needle gauges
made in England, 1940-50s

I am a knitter – and a collector – so naturally I have started to collect knitting needles gauges.

It’s sort of an amalgamation of my interests in the domestic arts- knitting- and technology. Here we have two aluminium gauges: the first is a bell gauge made by Emu, in England in the 1940s.

It’s a lovely anodised aluminium green: the Emu logo is a ball of wool with knitting needles for legs. It’s unusual in that it sizes needle gauges internally- rather than externally, which was the practice up to the 40s.

The second gauge is a ’D-shaped’ gauge by Stratnoid Aluminium – this being the brand name of Stratton & Co, Birmingham. The gauge is unusual in that it indicates imperial and metric sizes.

I have just discovered that collecting needle gauges is a thing: it’s not just me! I have collected a few since this image was taken….

The two gauges are for sale: $AU40

Kookaburra teaset

Noritake kookaburra teasetNoritake kookaburra teaset
made in Japan c.1933

Have I mentioned that kookaburras are very collectible right now? Perhaps once or twice!

This delightful set of teapot, creamer and cake plate was made in 1933- as evidenced by the design of the Noritake backstamp. The backstamp also indicates the pieces were “exclusively made for the Commonwealth of Australia market” – this fascinating information found on the Noritake website.

It seems kookaburras were highly sought after in the 1930s too. On this set, the kookaburras are paired on one side of the piece, and single on the other. They are all handpainted, and quite delightful.

All pieces are in pristine condition.

This set is for sale: $155

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60s browny goodness

Graham Kerr lazy susan, Vogue plate, Mikasa jugGraham Kerr lazy susan, made in New Zealand, c.1960s
Vogue patterned melamine plate, made in Australia c.1960s
Mikasa jug, made in Japan, c.1960s

And now for something a little different- a collection of items connected by colour, and age.

You may remember the Galloping Gourmet, Graham Kerr? The original TV Masterchef. It not, then perhaps this quote from the introduction to one of his cookbooks from 1971 might jog your memory:

“To millions he was TV’s clumsily ingratiating Galloping Gourmet, a master of sauces and saucy innuendo…”

He seems to have also produced a line in timber veneer lazy susans, to which he added his name in fancy gold script. This lazy susan still works a treat- they made sturdy ball bearings in the 60s. It would be great to have it in the centre of one’s dining table, holding saucy-sauces for your dining companions’ pleasure!

The Vogue plate is a ‘squircle’- a round-edged square shape and it features a lovely abstract composition of cooking paraphernalia. And the lovely caramel/two-toned jug by Mikasa [“oven to table to dishwasher”, #c4800] completes the collection.

A lovely trio of browny-60s goodness. This set is for sale: $AUD65

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Minette slide viewer

Minette 35mm slide viewer
Minato Shokai Co, made in Japan, c.1950s

OK! Ok. Another slide viewer. But we all have slides to view. Or is it just me?

This viewer is just SO cute. Look how small it is…it’s a Minette. The kewpie doll is bigger than the viewer, and she carries a slide under her arm for scale.

And totally weirdly, like every other time I have bought a slide projector or a viewer, the Minette comes with a slide of its last owner…this time it’s an echtochrome slide of a woman on grass shading her eyes from the camera. Ms Kewpie is modelling that slide.

For sale: $AUD55 [please indicate if you’d like Kewpie and the slide included.]

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