Slide projector #9

Halinamat #300 slide projector [1962]Halinamat 300 slide projector
Empire Made [Hong Kong] 1962

It’s been a while, but here’s another slide projector. The count is now 9- I have nine slide projectors. I love the forms of these machines- the funky fonts on the front- and the fact that you can use them for slide nights. What’s not to love?

I also like that this Halinamat was made in the 60s- when ‘Empire Made’ referenced the British Empire and was code for Hong Kong. Along with its general funkiness, the projector has a bakelite side arm, on-off switch and electrical plug : it just gets better and better!

And the specs- this baby comes with an Anastigmat coated, f2.8/100mm lens, and is semi-automatic. Semi-automatic means you have to push the button on top to move to the next slide- full automation didn’t eventuate until the 70s.

I really, really, really don’t need nine slide projectors…this one is for sale: $AUD85

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60s slide projector

Hanimex Hanorama '300' slide projectorHanimex Hanorama ‘300’ slide projector
made in Australia c.1966

When I started this blog [two years ago] I had some Hanimex slide viewers [see post, way, way below.] I love slide viewers because my father was a photographer and lots of my childhood – and indeed other people’s childhoods and landscapes and tourist shots- were recorded on slides. We’d have slide nights at home where slide after slide was projected onto a white wall, accompanied by beer and chips. What larks!

Ok, back to my point. Since I started this blog – with the intention of showcasing my collection and trying to sell some of it- I have had to- HAD to – buy slide projectors. They just came to me. I am a slide projector MAGNET. I now have ten. In perfect, slide-projecting, order. This is number six. Isn’t she a beauty?

Lens: f=2.8/ 85mm. Lamp: 300 W, BA 15S short envelope lamp; still available today. Even if you never intend to use the projector it looks great as a display piece- with a fantastic 60s modernist vibe.

And for some reason, like all my other projectors, it comes with a Kodachrome slide from its last owners.

For sale: $AUD125

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Halinamat ‘300’ slide projector

Halinamat 300 slide projectorHalinamat 300 slide projector
Empire Made [Hong Kong] 1962

It’s been a while, but here’s another slide projector. The count is now 9- I have nine slide projectors. I love the forms of these machines- the funky fonts on the front- and the fact that you can use them for slide nights. What’s not to love?

I also like that this Halinamat was made in the 60s- when ‘Empire Made’ referenced the British Empire and was code for Hong Kong. Along with its general funkiness, the projector has a bakelite side arm, on-off switch and electrical plug : it just gets better and better!

And the specs- this baby comes with an Anastigmat coated, f2.8/100mm lens, and is semi-automatic. Semi-automatic means you have to push the button on top to move to the next slide- full automation didn’t eventuate until the 70s.

I really, really, really don’t need nine slide projectors…this one is for sale: $AUD85

Buy Now

Rollei 35mm slide projector

Rollei O350A slide projectorRollei 35mm slide projector
made in Braunschweig, Germany, 1971-1977

Yes, another slide projector…but this time a 70s version – with remote controller! [remember them?] Somewhat incongruous in these days of wireless connections, the ‘remote’ controller is a little red button set in a little grey box – with a giant cord tethering it to the machine.

Rollei are well known camera makers, but also started making slide projectors in the 1920s. This projector [P350A] has a tray that can take up to 50 slides, and comes in its original box with its original manual and warranty papers [now sadly, somewhat redundant.] But when everything is in the original box, you know that the previous owner cared for and looked after the projector.

This is the first projector I have collected [see numerous posts, below] that hasn’t come with a slide left in the machine or the box by a previous owner. I was quite disappointed and considered whether I should allow this one into the collection…but its lovely 70s modern/boxy quality won me over in the end.

For sale: $AUD80

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Hanimex Hanorama ‘300’ slide projector

Hanimex Hanorama ‘300’ slide projector
made in Australia c.1966

When I started this blog [five months ago] I had some Hanimex slide viewers [see post, way, way below.]  I love slide viewers because my father was a photographer and lots of my childhood – and indeed other people’s childhoods and landscapes and tourist shots- were recorded on slides. We’d have slide nights at home where slide after slide was projected onto a white wall, accompanied by beer and chips. What larks!

Ok, back to my point. Since I started this blog – with the intention of showcasing my collection and trying to sell some of it- I have had to- HAD to – buy slide projectors. They just came to me. I am a slide projector MAGNET. I now have four. In perfect, slide-projecting, order. This is the fourth. Isn’t she a beauty?

Lens: f=2.8/ 85mm. Lamp: 300 W, BA 15S short envelope lamp; still available today.

And for some reason, like all my other projectors, it comes with a Kodachrome slide from its last owners.

For sale: $AUD125

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Minolta ‘Mini’ folding slide projector

Minolta ‘Mini’ folding slide projector
made in Japan, c.1950s

Another Mini projector! The first was a Hanimex, made in Australia, and now this Minolta from Japan- both made in same time period. They seem to gravitate towards me…

The Mini comes with its own funky white vinyl bag [black piping, metal zip, internal compartments for all the bits] a dual slide changer AND an ‘Autochanger’ and is in excellent working order.  The Autochanger allows you to stack a number of 35mm slides on both sides so one needn’t hold up the slide-show too long.

The lens is 1:2.5, f=7.5mm, and it runs on 200-240 V, AC/DC. The current bulb is still working, and I have researched replacement bulbs: a $10 CDS 100 watt, 115-120 volt bulb will suffice. There’s a cute little bakelite on/off switch on the electrical cord.

And the last owners left a lovely Ektachrome slide in the case- which I shall pass onto the next lucky owner- it’s a lovely vignette of two women and a boy enjoying beer and chips at a social gathering! Priceless!

For sale: $AUD125

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Fafix slide projector

Fafix slide projector
made in Germany, c.1950s

This is a beautiful bakelite slide projector. I love the funky “Z” logo! –which is an unusual choice for a company called Fafix. The projector wants to be out on display: with its outer case removed, it’s like looking at a cross-section of a simple 50s machine.

The projector is missing its two-pronged electrical cable, so I haven’t been able to test it, but these are easily picked up. It has a 50 watt lamp and a detachable slide mount [not seen in images.]It comes with its original instruction booklet, and someone along its life has made it a nice timber box.

This projector ticks all the boxes for me: it’s simply constructed, photographic, and made of bakelite.     For sale: $AUD75

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Hanimex ‘Mini’ folding slide projector

ClosedHanimex ‘Mini’ folding slide projector
made in Sydney, Australia c.1950s

This neat little projector folds out to show slides in both 16mm and 35mm slide formats. It has a P-Rokkor 2.5/40mm lens and uses a 75watt lamp; I have it on good authority that replacement lamps are still available. The projector works a treat – it’s been checked over by an electrician – and has an ‘automatic’ slide feed to allow you to load two slides at a time [!!] It comes in its original box, which sadly has been mended with masking tape.

Perfect for your next slide night or to add to your burgeoning Hanimex collection. I am reluctantly parting this projector- it’s a beautiful as well as a functional object.

For sale: $AUD145

Open

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