Viewmaster Junior Projector

Viewmaster Junior Projector, 50s, USAViewmaster Junior Projector
made in Portland, Oregon 1957

The first Viewmaster was made in the 1930s by William Gruber, who was fascinated with Nineteenth Century stereoscopes. He partnered with Sawyers Co. to produce viewers which debuted at the 1939 World’s Fair.

This ‘Junior’ projector was made in 1957 – at the same time all the classic bakelite hand-held Viewmasters were made. These were called the Model C Viewer and were made from 1946-1955.  But while the hand-helds view reels in stereoscope, this projector- using the same reels- projects in monoscope. The projector is cast metal and bakelite, and has a similar level mechanism to advance the reels as the hand-helds, and all reels made are compatible. The projector comes in its original box, which is in good vintage condition.

Along with this fantastic junior ‘toy’ [every child in the 50s wanted one!] come a great range of original 50s reels. The range from Australia themes [“5010 The Great Barrier Reef”, “5121 Adelaide & Vicinity”] to American themes [“291 California Wild Flowers”, “157 New York City”] and for some odd reason, a single Movie Star themed: “Gene Autry and his wonder horse Champion”. That’s a real corker!

The Junior Projector is for sale: $AU120. For a full list of the reels, please email : reretroblog.gmail.com

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party like it’s….1950s

50s Melbourne tray and Glamaware teapotsMelbourne bar tray, made in Hong Kong, 1950s
Glamaware anodised aluminium teapots, made in Australia 1950s

Welcome to 2017. And welcome to my retro ideal.

This is a fantastic bar tray, featuring a rather [re-touched] photograph of Melbourne in the 50s. Oh! The glamour!

And a pair of Glamaware anodised aluminium gold teapots, never been used. More glamour! The handles and knobs are bakelite. The anodised aluminium is gold! Bling and functional- that’s my kinda 2017.

Welcome in 2017 with some bar ware, and some good ol’ fashioned tea ware. Best of both worlds!

The tray is for sale: $AU25 and the teapots: $AU45
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60s kitschiness [is my kinda kitschiness]

60s kitschinessMelbourne tray, made in Hong Kong, 1960s
Hornsea sugar bowl, made in England, 1960s
Diana ramekins, made in Australia, 1960s.

An ode to 60s kitschiness – a bar tray featuring the beautiful city of Melbourne in the 60s- terrible image, much touched-up and with an explanatory label; a green ‘Heirloom’ sugar bowl, stoneware designed and produced by John Clappison in 1966 for Hornsea; and a pair of Diana ramekins, made in Marrickville, Sydney in the late 60s.

A range of 60s aesthetics: the tacky, the patterned and the late-modernist. All now very desirable and collectable. People collect bar-themed paraphenalia [‘barphenalia’] – Hornsea is oh-so collectable now, and Diana pottery [and ramekins especially] is becoming very desirable.

All these items are in good vintage condition, and are for sale: Melbourne bar tray: $AU20, Hornsea Heirloom sugar bowl: $AU25, and the Diana ramekins: $AU20.

Polaroid LAND camera

Polaroid LAND 1000 cameraPolaroid Land 1000 Camera
made in USA 1965-1970

A man named Edwin Land developed the Polaroid LAND camera; seen here is the now famous black ‘striped’ Model 1000. Land was the first to use film that developed outside the camera.

The Polaroid camera was the first cheap, mass-produced fixed lens camera that was marketed to the young – apparently Barry Manilow sang the adverts jingle, while Ali MacGraw frolicked on a beach. Since the beach-frolicking youth were new to this new-fangled photography lark, the camera was made as a point-and-shoot.

Polaroid film is no longer available, but a great company called the Impossible Project [www.the-impossible-project.com] produces new instant film materials for these classic polaroid cameras. Hurrah! You can now take pictures like a young Ali MacGraw!

The model 1000 came in both white and black forms- but the black is the best known. It uses SX-70 film, also available for the Impossible Project.

The camera comes untested and for sale: $AUD65

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Slide projector #9

Halinamat #300 slide projector [1962]Halinamat 300 slide projector
Empire Made [Hong Kong] 1962

It’s been a while, but here’s another slide projector. The count is now 9- I have nine slide projectors. I love the forms of these machines- the funky fonts on the front- and the fact that you can use them for slide nights. What’s not to love?

I also like that this Halinamat was made in the 60s- when ‘Empire Made’ referenced the British Empire and was code for Hong Kong. Along with its general funkiness, the projector has a bakelite side arm, on-off switch and electrical plug : it just gets better and better!

And the specs- this baby comes with an Anastigmat coated, f2.8/100mm lens, and is semi-automatic. Semi-automatic means you have to push the button on top to move to the next slide- full automation didn’t eventuate until the 70s.

I really, really, really don’t need nine slide projectors…this one is for sale: $AUD85

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Retro Italian souvenir images

Retro Italian souvenir images [1950s]retro Italian souvenir images,
made in Italy 1960s

This collection was inspired after I visited Italy. It comprises a c.1960s Venice guidebook, 60s postcards in book form from Venice, Roma and Florence and 60s souvenir film slides from Rome and the Vatican.

The souvenir guide book is in excellent condition and is quite funny to read with its mangled English. The souvenir postcard books have never been used and are still complete – the old retro photographs are very stage-managed and have been colour-touched in that delightful 60s era style.

The souvenir slides have never been opened, and I expect they will have that lovely rosy patina of all old slides. They could be viewed using one of the Haminex slider viewers, posted below!

The Italian souvenir images are for sale: $65

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Kodaslide

Kodakslide file, 1950sKodaslide Compartment File
made in Australia, 1950s

Another fantastic Kodak metal 35mm slide holder.

It’s all metal- even the red slide-out slide holders are anodised red aluminium. Each of which holds 10 x 35mm slides. And that lovely Kodak frontspiece- all intact.

Totally collectable- and in excellent vintage condition.

This Kodaslide is for sale: AU$65

Birdie Type II projector

Fuji Birdie Type II projector, 1950sFuji Birdie Type II projector
made in Japan, 1950s

I’ve collected a number of mini projectors – where the 35mm slide projector folds up or compacts into a tiny space for ease of transport – and surprise! – here’s another.

The Birdie projectors are as small as is possible: hence the name. It’s all metal construction though- so it’s not lightweight; even the cover is metal. The on-off switch and the plug are bakelite; and the switch presents as a marketing opportunity as it sports ‘Fuji Film’ in raised letters.

The projector shows some wear to the base- it’s had a good life showing holiday snaps by the thousands; but is in excellent working order and has been checked by an electrician.

The Birdie Type II is for sale: $AU135

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Super, super 8

Diamond Super 8 Editor, 1950sDiamond Super 8 Editor
made in Japan, 1950s

Super 8 film is having a resurgence, and super 8 cameras and editors are being dusted off and put back into use. You only have to look at YouTube to see how many videos are being made using this fantastic 50s technology.

This Editor is fully working, and comes in its original box with splicer, spare bulb, reels of film and even splicing cement [not sure how good it will be after sixty-odd years but the box packing is fabulous.] It’s been tested by an electrician and deemed good to go.

Even if you don’t use the editor to – you know- edit, it is a beautiful piece of engineering that will lend industrial cred to any space.

The Editor [and assorted accoutrements] is for sale: $AU150

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Slidex slide library

Hanimex Slidex slide library, 1950sHanimex ‘Slidex’ slide library
made in Australia 1950s

I love and collect Hanimex – slide projectors, slide viewers and now- a slide library. Each of the three drawers has flip out slide-holders [yellow, red, green] and each can hold 120 x 35mm slides. The slide library is pristine – never been used. Opposite the drawers is an index – to note the title of each of the twelve slide holders in each drawer- and the drawers themselves have a space for a label integral with the drawer pull. All you need is a typewriter: the index is removable and so can be inserted into a typewriter to be completed; and the drawer labels could similarly be typed. Tres tres cool!

Hanimex is an Australian company that commenced importing cameras and lenses in 1947. Jack Hannes started the company and the name Hanimex is an abbreviation of his company name: Hannes Import Export. By the mid 50s Hanimex was making and selling smaller photographic equipment –like this slide library- in Australia. Cameras that were still imported were rebadged Hanimex Topcon, the second name indicating the original manufacturer.

The precision engineering that has gone into making this compact, portable slide library is fantastic.

The slide library is for sale: team it with one of more of the other fantastic Hanimex products on this site! $AUD75

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