Collectible Pyrex

Pyrex pie dishesPyrex pie dishes
made in Australia c1960s

Following on from my last Pyrex post, here’s Trish’s Pyrex collection- coloured pie dishes made in the 60s. The pie dishes came in a vast rainbow of colours that co-ordinated with other kitchen items- condiment dishes and mixing bowls and the like. Trish has kept her collection to yellow, orange, red which works well in our contemporary kitchen.

The tempered glass is still fantastic for cooking pies: we favour meat pies and lemon meringue tarts…they cook quickly and evenly and the dish is a dream to wash up afterwards. The pie dishes come in four standard sizes and so nest when not in use; you gotta love vintage that still functions as intended and also looks good.

The only downside is they are not dishwasher proof; you do see a lot of ruined Pyrex dishes around- the colour does not stand up to the harsh detergent abrasives and becomes mottled and washed out in tone.

 

60s Pyrex

Pyrex canistersPyrex ‘Stack & See’ canisters
made in USA, c.1968

I use these canisters- with their funky 60s colours – to store my retro sewing collection. Any sort of see-through canister is great for re-use – as is stackability – a great 60s invention. These Pyrex canisters came in 4 different sizes- the largest is shown here.

You can collect the canisters in the colour-ways; green, yellow, orange, red or blue: make sure the sealing ring is intact; and that the Pyrex motif is on the base- there are a few fake imitations around. They don’t make them like they used to.

60s sunflowers

Ridgway 'Soleil' plattersRidgway Ironstone ‘Soleil’ platters
made In Stroke-on-Trent, England 1960s

Ironstone is a vitreous pottery first made in England in the late Eighteenth Century as a cheaper mass-produced alternative to porcelain. Ridgeway was in production in Stoke-on-Trent from 1790 to 1964; and these platters were one of the last productions of the pottery.

‘Soleil’ – as in Cirque du Soleil- as soleil means “sun” – is a sunflower motif. I love the broad, elongated shape of these platters emphasised with a border- with a pure circular inset with its abstract sunflowers. These platters would look great hung on a wall. Forget whacking food on them- this is 60s art at its best!

The platters are in excellent condition and are for sale: $AUD55

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Kelco espresso set

Kelco espresso set 'Tulip'Kelco espresso set
made in Japan, 1960s

This charming espresso set of six cups and saucers comes in its original box: it’s never been used.

Largardo Tackett designed this set for Kelco – for the 60s European market. It’s called ‘Tulip’ [pattern K-41] and features abstract tulip shapes. I’ve seen the set in reds, blues and black and white…but I like this orange set the best. They weren’t shy about colour in the 60s, and the orange has been repeated on the saucer.

The espresso set would brighten a modern, monochrome kitchen and lend a certain retro aesthetic to the dining table. The set is for sale: $AUD85

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Bambi!

Retro bambis: 60s planters & cross stitchDeer and snow landscape cross stitch, made in Australia c.1960
Bambi planters, made in Japan c.1960

My son [Gen Y] likens cross stitch to ‘pixel art’ and I can see his point. I have teamed this rather impressive cross stitch of deers in their natural habitat with two bambi planters. Together they make a great ensemble.

The bambi planters can – indeed- hold plants or utensils, etc and they are in good condition. The cross stitch- by some unknown pixel artist of the 1960s, is framed and ready to hang- and likewise is in good condition.

This ensemble is for sale: $AUD95

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50s brooches

50s brooches50s costume brooches
made in Australia

Further to my last post featuring ‘pearlescence’ [fake pearl-i-ness] costume jewellery, here is my collection of 50s brooches. I have already confessed to a love of green costume jewellery and you can see that that colour features in this collection also.

I collected these brooches from all over the place- one by one, and now there is a little collection I thought I’d offer them for sale. For people who love to use one or two retro pieces in their daily ensemble- or for people who dress entirely in the 50s, this collection would be a useful addition to the wardrobe.

For sale: $AUD100

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50s costume jewellery

Diana wattle plate and 50s costume jewellery50s costume jewellery,
made in Australia

One of my earliest memories is of my mother’s dark green earrings. To this day, I love green jewellery- especially costume jewellery of a certain vintage.

This necklace and earrings are displayed on a Diana plate [may have mentioned Diana in a few posts…] I love botanical images and this wattle plate is a favourite; its colours and vintage accord well with the jewellery. All the jewellery features ‘pearlescence’ – fake pearl-i-ness [I’m not making this up!]- a particularly glamorous invention of the 50s. I especially love the clasp on the necklace – it looks like two earrings on either side of the clasp. Such attention to detail, even when often the clasp was not always seen under a ladies’ 50s bouffant.

The middle pair of [‘grape drop’, olive-green] earrings are screw-on, whilst the other two pairs are clip-ons. The green round earrings are similar in colour/tone to the necklace, although I purchased them separately and they are not a set. However, since every second bead is spherical, I think one could get away with wearing the necklace and the round earrings as an ensemble. The white pearlescence earrings round out a nice little set.

If you buy this set, you must totally send me photo of you wearing/modelling it! For sale: $AUD80

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40s Bakewells

Bakewells bowl and jugBakewells mixing bowl and jug
made in Sydney, Australia 1930s

Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved from making industrial pieces [bricks and pipes] to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the early 30s Bakewells was making pudding bowls and banded mixing bowls in multi colours- all to meet the insatiable demand of the new middle class.

Bakewells was in Bexley, in Sydney and is now very well known and very collectible. Particularly collectible are the banded bowls like this blue one- they can also be found in yellow, purple and green. The matching jug- with its 30s post-art-deco styling is made with the same off-white glaze. Perfect for the contemporary kitchen!- or the Bakewells enthusiast.

The bowl and jug are for sale: $125

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Upcycled 50s garden table

Upcycled 50s garden tableUpcycled 50s garden table
made- and upcycled- in Sydney Australia; 1950s & 2015

Another fine example of Trish’s upcycled 50s garden tables. Don’t you just love the butterfly magazine rack and the new black glass top?

Trish stripped the rust/imperfections from the steel frame, painted it with anti-rust and then three coats of matt black enamel paint. The glass is made to measure- and who knew that black glass is three times the price of any other coloured glass? Still- it looks fantastic; it has beveled edges and it’s safety-glass. New rubber feet complete the table.

This table is not for sale: it’s a keeper. It’s just the size for an inner-city terrace- and as it’s weatherproofed it has the added advantage that it can be used indoors or outdoors. I’ve teamed the table with an old industrial flask and eucalyptus leaves and a 50s school map.

Australian pottery history

Nell McCredie pottery, 1930s AustraliaMcCredie pottery
made in Sydney, Australia 1930-1940

Following from my last post, here are some more archetypal works from the Architect-turned-potter Nell McCredie.

Five pieces that evidence McCredie’s idiosyncratic matt white outer-glaze, with a cool green shiny inner glaze. The pieces are: [from back to front] – a gondola vase [with attached frog, as you’d expect]; a posey floating vase; two smaller ‘tulip’ vases and a pin dish [read ‘ashtray’ by a more acceptable name.]

Some of the pieces evidence internal crazing due to age…these pieces were all hand-made eighty years ago. As with all her work, McCredie’s pottery is hand signed on the base: ‘McCredie N.S.W.‘

These five pieces of Australian history are for sale: $AUD245

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