Christmas baubles

Knitted nanna baublesHipster Christmas decorations
made in Sydney, Australia 2013

How cool are these Christmas baubles? Hand-knitted – in pure Australian wool-  these decorations will lend your Christmas tree some real hipster cred.

Made by a lovely Nanna using a 1970 knitting pattern, this set of 20 baubles is both environmentally sustainable and – quite hilarious. Environmentally sustainable because she used her left over wool pieces, and hilarious because she used her left over wool pieces [~not so much the red and green or tinselly colours.]

You’ve seen the urban art of knitted wraps around trees and poles – now see the knitted Christmas decorations! Christmas just got 1970 crafty!

The set of 20 [all different] Christmas baubles is for sale: $AUD40

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70s show pony

Fisher Product, revolving cassette holderA Fischer Product rotating cassette case
made in Australia 1970s

A rotating bookcase is called a ‘Canterbury’- so I imagine a rotating cassette case is also a canterbury.

This is a four-sided, rotating cassette holder: with ten cassettes to a side, that’s 40 cassettes! The transparent yellow cassette holders are mounted on a matt black ‘lazy susan’ type wheel.

Perhaps you could showcase other items on the four sides. I don’t know- but – the whole system is working. And if you had 40 cassettes to stow, then this is the vintage item for you!

For sale: $AU45
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Crystal Craft, c1960s

Crystal Craft trivet, marine opal 1960sCrystal Craft trivet,
made in Australia, 1960s

Crystal Craft is SO collectable right now! It’s a resin compound made to “look like glass” from Queensland, Australia.

Here we have a trivet- with embedded ‘marine opals’- with its original label on back. Highly collectable. I have posted other ‘marine opals’ if you care to look.

For sale: $AU25

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Fuzzy Felt!

Fuzzy Felt Ballet & Play FarmFuzzy Felt Ballet & Play Farm
made in England 1964

One of my earliest memories is seeing Fuzzy Felt Bible Stories at Scripture class. I would have been 3 or 4. Even then I wanted to mix all the stories up and see what would happen if Jesus and Lazarus meet on Noah’s Ark. And what if the disciples and all the animals suddenly found themselves in King Solomon’s temple? Alas, it never happened as any attempts I made were neatly thwarted by the teacher.

And so- how I coveted Fuzzy Felt Bible Stories! I repeatedly asked Santa to bring it to me for Christmas [but apparently it was too expensive for Santa- the cheapskate!] Then for my 8th birthday- I was given Fuzzy Felt Ballet, and my younger sister got Fuzzy Felt Play Farm. I was very disappointed…it was too girly for me, although the black fuzzy felt board was kind of sophisticated. The Play Farm at least had heavy machinery, albeit picked out in two-dimensional felt.

So imagine my delight when I came across these two Fuzzy Felt sets! Oh the nostalgia! The memories of putting ballerinas on tractors and putting tutus on pigs! It all came flooding back. As did the blurb on the box:

“Gaily coloured felt shapes to make pictures! They cling like magic on the fuzzy board!”

Totally magical. The two sets are complete, with only a little minor wear to the black fuzzy felt board. For sale: $AU60

Electronic printing calculators #70sstyle

Adler & Casio electronic printing calculatorsAdler & Casio electronic printing calculators
made in Japan c.1970s

How cool are these printing calculators? And fun to use. I could play with those big chunky keys all day- and don’t get me started on the sound of the printing!

For the more serious minded collectors out there- the Adler is your 121PD model, type CP 46[3], 220/240 V, and the Casio is your GR-2250, AC 220V, 50/60Hz. Did I mention they are totally fun to play with calculate with?

Ink and paper rolls are still available, so you could have these beauties on your desk and tote up your tax accounts with style. Or- a la Mad Men- add up the cost of the booze for the christmas party! Hey!- they go up to 12 digits!

The two machines are in excellent working order and are for sale: $AU145 [come with new paper rolls]

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70s telephone intercom phones [sold]

Telefon children's intercom toy telphones, 1970sTelefon children’s telephone toy
made in Germany, c.1970s

How cute are these push button intercom phones! A friend of mine who received them as a birthday present in the 70s [his was garish blue and white] said that his mother would ‘call’ him in his bedroom to tell him his dinner was ready! How cute!

This set has never been used, and comes in its original box. They are made ‘for ages 3 and up’, have 10m [33ft] of wire to allow use in different rooms, and take two 9V batteries. This is the pre-wireless age, peoples!

A perfect [nostalgic] Christmas present for someone 3 and up!

For sale: $AU75

Hipster Christmas decorations

Knitted Christmas baubles, c 2013Hipster Christmas decorations
made in Sydney, Australia 2013

How cool are these Christmas baubles? Hand-knitted – in pure Australian wool-  these decorations will lend your Christmas tree some real hipster cred.

Made by a lovely Nanna using a 1970 knitting pattern, this set of 20 baubles is both environmentally sustainable and – quite hilarious. Environmentally sustainable because she used her left over wool pieces, and hilarious because she used her left over wool pieces [~not so much the red and green or tinselly colours.]

You’ve seen the urban art of knitted wraps around trees and poles – now see the knitted Christmas decorations! Christmas just got 1970 crafty!

The set of 20 [all different] Christmas baubles is for sale: $AUD40

Buy Now

Donald Clark #upcycled cushions [sold]

Donald Clark upcycled cushions, 1960sDonald Clark upcycled cushion covers
made in Australia 1960s

I recently celebrated two Donald Clark wall hangings – ‘Lotus’ and ‘Paddington Terraces’. I had only just posted the images when both hangings were snapped up.

These are a pair of cushion covers I upcycled from another Donald Clark hanging. Clark’s signature is on the bottom right of the right hand cushion. You can see the left cushion once sat above the top of the right cushion- forming a 60s flower posy.

Donald Clark was really two brothers, Robert and Bruce Clark who started producing screen-printed linen items in 1952 in Sydney. The company is still in production, now managed by Liz Clark [Robert’s daughter] and mostly involved with re-issuing original designs.

Clark’s work- usually on linen, and always featuring bold, abstract images in great 50s and 60s colours- is now very collectable. A lot of the works were on linen teatowels, which makes me think that people were influenced by great art in the household context – and now grew nostalgic for the art they remember when drying up!

I love the graphic quality of the images – really very bold for Australia in the 50s and 60s. I used vintage linen for the backs of the covers – in a green that complements the brilliant colours of the design.

These upcycled cushion covers: $AU50/pair

Airline travel bag

Orbitours travel bag, 1960sAirline travel bag
Made in Hong Kong, 1960s

Airline bags have become SO popular and collectable that there are now reproductions of classic Qantas bags- made in China, c. 2014- being sold for crazy prices on EBay. A REAL Qantas travel bag should cost in the order of $AU100 – but a repro? That should go for ten bucks [that’s 2 bucks for materials & assembly, 1 buck to ship it, and 7 dollars or 70% profit to the seller.] AND it should be clearly marked as a repro.

So- how to tell a fake? Well, take this Orbitour travel bag for example. It has its original sticker inside:

‘Nylon Coated Plastic
Made In Hong Kong”.

Sporting an original sticker, and made in Hong Kong [rather than China]; plus – it has some stitching missing on one handle and a little on the zip. Repros are startlingly perfect, looking like a facsimile of the original. You can’t fake age!

And the colour- that super cobalt blue with slightly wonky white font – it’s correct for the 60s.

I’ve teamed the Orbitours bag with an old 40s school case. It’s had some repair work- new rivets hold a new internal timber frame to the lid, but the locks and hinges and metal handle are all still original and working. It was made by the ‘American Bag Stores, Travelling Goods Specialists’, in Australia [as described on the internal label.] Talk about an original!

The Orbitours bag [Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane] is for sale: $AU55
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The old school case is for sale: $AU45
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‘Anthropomorphic Collectibles’

Apple s&p shakers, Japan 1960sApple salt & pepper shakers
made in Japan, 1960s

I have discovered that people love, really LOVE anthropomorphic figurines. Ebay even has a section “Anthropomorphic Collectibles”. These apples with startlingly large faces – reminiscent of early manga- have another thing going for them: they are functional salt and pepper shakers.

The shakers are part of a larger apple-faced set that includes a cookie jar [how collectable are cookie jars!] teapot, creamer and cup and saucers. Like many OTT things, I find that less is more- when you put the whole collection together the sum of the parts is less than the whole. You can have too much of a good thing. [And this coming from an avowed kitscher-lover!] My idea would be mix ‘n’ match with other faced ceramics – and make a sort of kitsch family.

The shakers are in great vintage condition, but have lost their original cork stoppers. All the shakers I have collected that used cork stoppers are in this state- it seems the cork only lasted a decade or two.

The apple shakers are for sale: $AU35

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