50s souvenir spoons

Squire souvenir teaspoons,
made in England 1950s

For all your boiled egg-eating or coffee-stirring needs [refer last two posts]- here is a boxed set [never used] of silver plated teaspoons hailing from the Old Dart.

From left to right we have- represented by their flags- England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Great Britain and London. SO- Great Britain of the 60s.

My whole family is English- I am first generation Australian- and so have an affinity for anything Old Dartish. These teaspoons, being silver-plated, would have been an expensive gift to bring back as a travel gift; and I expect that since they have never been out the box, the gift recipient knew this and put the box away in the “good room”.

It’s time that the spoons were put to their purpose- or maybe made into an art piece- but released from the box! The set is for sale: $AU45

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Coffee collection

Ceramic coffee canister
made in Japan, 1960s

Further to my life-long quest to collect every known coffee canister – here is one posing as a coffee house. I’ve styled it with a Nally plastic coffee canister – Australian – of the same vintage. It’s interesting [to me anyway] that coffee wasn’t a big deal in the 60s – so that the canisters were smaller usually than tea- the bigger sized canisters in nested sets always belonged to sugar, rice and flour. Nowadays- I expect- sugar would be the smallest canister and coffee the largest!

Anyhoo- I like the idea of putting all my various single origin and coffee blends in different, miss-matched vintage coffee canisters. So far, all canisters- both plastic and ceramic- are roughly the same size – and just so happen to fit a bag of 250g coffee. So maybe those 60s canister makers did know what they were doing!

The ceramic ‘coffee house’ canister is in excellent vintage condition, and is for sale; $AU25

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Black and white- and plastic chrome

Breakfast set,
made in Hong Kong, 1960s

This is an- as new- never been used- breakfast set; two eggcups and salt and pepper shakers. They are made in state-of-the-art plastics; you’ll note the ‘plastic’ chrome feet which were revolutionary in the 60s!

Plastics used for everyday kitchenware was also revolutionary- the space race bought more than just lustreware to the ceramic industry. This set of four was sold to the restaurant industry; the black and white colourings evoked the checkerboard tiles of every diner and milk bar in the western world.

The pieces haven’t been used, and so are in pristine condition- just ready for your use in the 21st Century.  They are for sale: $AU25

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Studio Anna style

Studio Anna wall plates & salt and pepper shakers
made in Australia 1950s

Studio Anna started their art pottery in 1953, in Marrickville [just near where I now live.] Unlike many other potteries in the area, Studio Anna commenced with making art pieces; rather than converting from industrial/commercial products as part of the cultural changes that the 50s ushered in.

Like Martin Boyd pottery- examples of which have been previously posted- Studio Anna specialised in hand-painted ‘Australiana’ themes. Flora and fauna and local iconic sites were depicted – I have several Studio Anna pieces that feature local hotels [oh! the 50s glamour!] as they were sold as souvenirware.

Here we have wall plates – featuring the lovely cities of Adelaide and Albury. And Moree is featured on the salt and pepper shakers. Wall plates are definetly a lost art form- you don’t find ceramic artists making them any more. These two are made with specialist hanging apparatus built into the backplate.

For Studio Anna collectors- or those considering collection- this would make a nice gift. The set of wall plates and s&p shakers are for sale: $AU80

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70s brutalism

Diana salt & pepper shakers
made in Australia, 1970s

Further to the Diana pottery from the 40s and 50s recently discussed- meet some Diana from the 70s! This range is called ‘Safari’.

Earthen tones [tick] brutalist, oversize shape [tick] chunky form devoid of decoration [tick.] This is the 70s alright!

I have also collected the teapot, and creamer in Safari: but like a lot of 70s ware, I find less is less. It is possible to have too much of a good thing. However- if you are a big fan of the 70s [ie: you didn’t actually have to live through that time] you may like to consider the teapot and creamer.

The brutalist salt and pepper shakers are for sale: $AU25

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Swinging 60s

Arabia ‘Kosmos’ espresso cups
Broadhurst Kathie Winkle ‘Calypso’ platter
made in Finland, England 1960s

Arabia pottery is uber collectble right now: here we have Kosmos, designed by Gunvor Olin-Gronquist [or GOG, as noted on the backstamp.] Kosmos dinner service sets were made between 1962 and 1976; these are espresso cups, for that perfect morning cuppa.

Also featuring in the image- Kathie Winkle for Broadhurst pottery- a ‘Calypso’ platter. This was made in 1963; Kathie Winkle was so prolific in producing different designs [over one hundred] in the 60s that each design was made for less than a year. The transfer stencil outline has been hand-painted, and then over-glazed, so no two pieces are exactly the same.

The Arabia cups are for sale: $AU55/pair, as is the Kathie Winkle platter: $AU35. A fabulous ode to the 60s!

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Wall pocket vases #50sstyle

Diana wall pocket vases
made in Sydney, Australia 1950s

I have posted much about Diana, a Marrickville [Sydney] pottery that produced from 1940 to 1975. I live very close to Marrickville, so became fascinated with this pottery and um…collected…a…bit…of it….. ..  .. . .

By the late 50s Diana was experimenting with ‘Australian’ colours [read: bush colours] and moving away from the classic 50s pastels of powder blue, baby pink, soft yellow, etc. These wall pocket vases were also made in those colours, but now they were being hand-coloured with the greens and browns of the eucalypt bushland.

The hand-applied glaze meant that no two vases were the same- and the new colours were enthusiastically taken up by a community eager to embrace new concepts of nationalism. Every vase shape and form was re-created using the new colourway; so you have art deco inspired shapes – to more modernist, assymetrical shapes- but now having the new nationalist colours.

These three wall pockets are part of my own collection- but alas- I do not have the wall space to do them justice and they have been boxed up for a decade. It’s now time they went to someone’s wall – to display eucalyptus sprays – of course!

The three Diana wall pockets are for sale: $AU225

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Poole #60sstyle

Poole platter, serving dish and aperitif dish
made in England, 1960s.

Poole is a very well known pottery, which started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

Poole is well known for its ‘Twintone’ pottery– their expression – a simple, stylish contrast of two colours. These three pieces are from the twintone series C104: sky blue & dove grey.

I have featured Poole before, and other twintone colourways – the elegant 50s and 60s styling and the deep pastel colours and very beautiful. Poole is very collectable, and there are many websites devoted to it’s fandom.

These three pieces are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU75

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Wade tankard

Wade half-pint tankard
made in England, 1960s

Originally founded in 1810, Wade pottery is famous for the introduction of the very collectible Wade ‘Whimsies’ [miniature porcelain figurines originally conceived as pocket friends for children in the 1950s] and the almost as well known Wade whiskey Jugs, decanters and tankards. So children’s AND adult’s collectables!

This is a half-pint tankard; it was also made in a pint size; made to resemble a barrel, complete with guilt banding. Other Wade tankards have transfer prints of [rare] cartoon characters, and old fashioned cars [ubiquitous.] But for my money, the barrel tankards are the best.

The Wade backstamp marks this tankard as having been made in the 60s; since inception, the Wade backstamp changed constantly, and so is a reliable indicator of the pieces age. I’ve teamed the tankard with a book dedicated to England’s Greater Churches: I bet a couple of tankards found their way into a greater church…and made it an ever greater church!

Cheers! The tankard is in excellent vintage condition and is for sale: $AU15

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Bakewells blue & white striped

Bakewells jug & pudding bowl
made in Sydney, Australia 1930s

Bakewells started production in Sydney in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved from making bricks and pipes to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the 1920s, they were manufacturing vases [‘exclusive ware’] and domestic ware [jugs, pudding bowls, coffee pots and ceramic canisters.]

Here we have a blue and white striped jug and pudding bowl from the 30s; the blue and white colours were used to resemble English Cornish Ware and were the premium pieces produced in the 20s and 30s. Every day pieces- were termed ‘Cream Ware’ while the blue and white pieces have the MADE BY BAKEWELLS, SYDNEY N.S.W. backstamp.

Being handmade in the 30s, the colour of the glaze and the clay used varied, so each piece is slightly different.  Three different sized jugs were made, and six different sized bowls; with the largest bowl having a pouring lip. This meant that pudding bowls could also be used as mixing bowls, and vice versa.

This set of jug and bowl are for sale: $AU105
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