10″ slide rules

10” slide rules
Hemmi, made in Japan, c.1954
Aristo, made in Japan, c. 1960
Royal, made in Japan, c.1960

The first slide rulers were developed in the C17th, for mathematical calculations. They were used consistently from this date until 1974, when they were replaced by the scientific calculator. The middle section moves between scales on top and bottom of the scales, and then an independent clear plastic slider is moved to allow the calculation to be read.

These 10” slide rulers [250mm] were made for the office; they are larger and allow more complex calculations that the smaller 5” portable scale rules […yes..they will appear in a previous post…I can’t help it…I love them!]

The Hemmi slide [topmost in the image] has a bamboo structure, with a plastic laminate covering; whilst the later slide rules are all solid plastic. All slide rules come in their own boxes [some with original operating instructions] and some have their original owners names incised on the box.

For sale: $AUD85

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Carlton Ware ‘contemporary ware’

Carlton Ware leaf dishes and salt & pepper shakersCarlton Ware ‘Contemporary Ware’ dishes and salt and pepper shakers, made in England 1951-1961

Many people are familiar with the botanically-themed Carlton Ware ceramics [and having a background in horticulture, I am quite ‘familiar’ with them myself.]  Various daisy/foxglove/wild rose motifs were made in the 30s, 40s and continuing into the 50s, but in 1951 a modernist theme emerged.  These leaf-shaped dishes and cubic salt and pepper shakers are an example of this and were dubbed ‘contemporary’ ware.

The four monochrome dishes have a wonderful abstract leaf shape, and so appeal to me. I also like the austerity and the somewhat obtuse cube-shaped shakers. These pieces are now quite hard to come by, and are all in perfect condition.

For sale: $AUD150

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60s jigsaws

60s jigsaws
made in Australia

Two delightful jigsaws, made from timber, in Australia in the 60s. The first was made by Louise Rayner Toys; the second – a teaching clock, is unmarked. Both jigsaws came from a nursery school, who purchased them in the 60s but now deemed them too ‘old-fashioned’ for today’s children. So – hello – retro!

I do remember playing with a clock jigsaw when I was at nursery school- the plastic handles are adjustable and have to be moved in order to get all the pieces in. And I just love the funky glasses on the coloured jigsaw- which is very ‘analogue’ with a clock and a rotary telephone!

Both jigsaws are in excellent vintage condition; with very little wear and are for sale: $AU45

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Blue Moon

Poole Blue Moon tea cups,
made in England 1960-1975

Poole is a very well known pottery, which started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

These tea cups – very modern in shape and sans handle – are part of the Cameo range. The colour is ‘Blue Moon’ –a deep blue exterior, with a slightly off-white interior [pure white would be too stark…this off-white is just right.] The set of eight tea cups and saucers have the traditional mid-century Poole mark on each piece.

The cups don’t hold much tea – not that I have used them as such – the lovely colour and repetition of form has had them serve a purely decorative function. But they would make for a lovely tea party.

For sale: $AUD145
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Golfing tee-spoons

Silver plated 'golf club' teaspoons, Australia, 1960sSilver plated ‘golf club’ teaspoons
made in Australia 1960s

I’ve researched these silver teaspoons, with their distinctive golf club finials- they are engraved with ‘CCC’. As near as I can tell, this would be Campbelltown Catholic Club, a golf club in – you guessed it- Campbelltown.

The set of six spoons are hallmarked for silver plate, made in Australia, in the 60s. They would suit a golf tragic or any golfing collector. So far I feel I have been of service to the golfing tragics- I have featured champagne flutes from the 50s [won in a golf tournament]; novelty glasses with golfing cartoons from the 40s, novelty plates with golfing cartoons from the 50s, golfing nip glasses from the 50s [where the level of alchol is measured thus: 2 over, 1 over, Birdie, Eagle], a Barbie doll complete with her golfing accoutrements, and – a hallmarked silver cup inscribed: “Selangor Golf Club Services Trophy 1958, Winners D.C. Hurst & L.M. Riedel” on a bakelite base.

I myself am not a golf tragic [I don’t have the patience/will power/co-ordination required.] But I know there are plenty of people who are.

The set of teaspoons came in this box, but it’s clearly not the original [it’s marked ‘Made in England’.]  The set is for sale: $AU60 [box included for shipping purposes.]

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Yarn Winder

Yarn Winder, made in Australia 1960sYarn Winder
made in Australia, 1960s

This yarn winder- new in box- was manufactured by Silver, and made in the 60s. It comes with a table-fixing clamp, and yarn guide and the original operating instructions. The winder has a pink metal base [powder pink] and the internal winding mechanism and winder are all metal. For all your yarn winding needs!

Okay, so few of us wind yarn now-a-days; but there are lots of sewing/knitting paraphernalia collectors who would love this winder. It’s never been used and it’s rare to find one in its original box. The box has some wear [see image] but the winder itself is as new.

The winder is for sale: $AU45

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60s goodness

Pyrex 'Sunburst' flask, Bessemer printed plate, 60sBessemer plate, made in Australia 1965-70
Pyrex ‘Sunburst’ flask jug, made in USA 1960s

This is Pyrex at its best- a jug modelled on a laboratory flask with an ‘atomic’ sunburst pattern in gold. The stopper is graduated plastic, in good old yellow plastic. The jug has a pouring lip, two litre capacity and being Pyrex, is good for hot and cold liquids. Pyrex is very collectible – and the jug is in excellent condition. And –it makes a terrific vase when it’s not serving hot and cold liquids.

The Bessemer plate is likewise very collectable. It is one of a series of six, designed by A. Wiederkehr – and is culturalyl important enough to be in the Powerhouse Museum collection. I would have loved to have collected all six- but alas- after so long hunting I have only found this one ‘in the wild’ [as collectors say.] I have found plenty of plates, of all the patterns – but they are invariably so scratched from use that I rejected purchasing.

If you are a Pyrex collector [and there are quite a few!] or a Bessemer collector, please check out the other items on my blog. I am a big fan of early 60s industrial designers – and Pyrex and Bessemer tick all the boxes!

The flask and plate are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU45

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Art glass paperweights

Studio glass paperweights, 1960sStudio glass paperweights, made in Australia, c1960s

These three paperweights show the 60s fascination with the ‘controlled bubbles’ glass technique. Controlled bubbles turned up in objects as diverse as vases, ashtrays and objects de art. And paperweights.

Paperweights seem slightly redundant in these days of the ‘paperless’ office. [nb: my drawing office is anything BUT paperless!] But the art glass pieces look fantastic back-lit on a windowsill, or as here- against a white wall. Click on the image for a larger view and admire the colours and bubbles!

All three pieces are unsigned, which is not unusual in art pieces of the 60s, but I have it on good authority that the pieces are Australian. There are many paperweight collectors out there [check out www.paperweight.org] and museums dedicated to collecting and exhibiting paperweights. From the Paperweight Collectors Association I learnt that there are three periods of paperweight collecting:

The Classic Period [1840-1880] – mostly French made paperweights
The Folk Art Period [1880-1940] and
The Contemporary Period [1940 to present.]

A very venerable history! This set of collectible paperweights is for sale: $AUD125

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Miniature toby jug

Miniature toby jug [Japan, 60s]Miniature toby jug
made in Japan, 1960s

This miniature jug hails from the 60s- from the time when Japan was a leading ceramic maker and was busy knocking-off old worldy antiques. It was at this time that the masses / new middle class were discovering antiques- and not being able to afford the real thing, were buying ‘new’ fakes by the millions.

This jug purports to be a pirate; it is hand-painted if somewhat crudely; you’d never mistake this for a real toby jug. The pirates’ hat has been cleverly fashioned to contain the pouring lip, and it looks as if he is roguishly looking up at it.

Start your fake toby jug collection today: the jug is for sale: $AU15

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Glass kitchen canisters

Glass kitchen canisters 1950sGlass kitchen canisters
made in Australia 1950s

Here is a selection of some of the glass kitchen canisters that I have collected for use in my kitchen: these are the ‘spares’. The thick, square glass canisters were originally filled with nuts or sugared almonds, and sold at Christmas time in the 50s and 60s. The plastic lids come in all manner of colours, and are still good and air-tight. So beautiful and functional!

I like that you can see how much sugar/flour/tea is left in the glass canisters, and now I associate red with ‘lentils’, blue with ‘couscous’, and green with ‘green tea’. This colour coding is a great idea!

I also have a selection of glass canisters with black bakelite lids- these only seemed to come in black- and they date earlier, probably the 40s.

The canisters are for sale: $AU20 [coloured plastic lids] and $AU30 [black bakelite lids.]