60s candlestick

Scheurich candlestick,
made in West Germany 1960s

By now you are all familiar with the term ‘fat lava’- the West German pottery that happened in the 60s and 70s that used crazy glazes, crazy shapes and crazy thick lava-esque patternings. Kinda grotesque at the time, but now much embraced and much celebrated.

Here is a more modestly coloured Scheurich candlestick. Although if orange wasn’t the colour of the 60s, I don’t know what was. And while Australians might call this a candle-holder; the European name for this device is a candlestick.

Like all Scheurich pottery, it has marks on the base: 255 /10. The first number is the pattern number, the second number is the height [in cm.] Those Scheurich potters!- so practical! I love the anti-gravity shape of the candlestick; and the colours of the candles I have teamed it with.

The candlestick has a tiny fleabite at the back, on the middle ring. I nearly didn’t buy it.  But it’s Scheurich, it’s fat lava, it’s a 60s candlestick! So, I have styled it with the fleabite to the back, and it is priced accordingly.

The Scheurich candlestick is for sale: $AU45

60s bowling case

Bowling case,
made in Australia 1960s

This is a polished leather bowling case – inside it has compartments for two bowls and a jack. The interior is crimson flock – which makes for a nice contrast for whatever stuff you want to carry in it.

On the exterior lid  is a dymo label that reads: West Walllsend B.C. – so I guess this once belonged to a bowling club in West Wallsend. This is lawn bowls, people – not ten pin.

The lock – and key provided- still work; but the hinge at rear has some wear, and there is some delamination of the leather edges internally. Nothing you wouldn’t expect from a polished leather case that is utilitarian in purpose and over fifty years old!

I love vintage suitcases and despise modern handbags- so this mini-case has housed my wallet, phone and keys for a good while. I kept the dymo label because it is an authentic piece of history – and it makes me laugh- and also marks this out as my bag. [In case, you know, anyone mistakes it for theirs!]

The polished leather bowling case is now for sale: $AU25

create-a-kit

Torro create-a-kit,
made in New Zealand 1960s

Here’s New Zealand’s answer to lego : create-a-kit. It’s new in box, never opened, with instructions for making houses, and robots, windmills and the like. It was made by Torro [Toys of Tomorrow!]

I like the images and font on the box, as much as the idea of making a primary coloured house of the 60s [the instruction images are hilarious – so retro!] I had a quick check to see all the pieces are still inside – and some of the bricks are still connected to the manufacturers frame.

The create-a-kit is for sale: $AU65

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Terra Ceramics ‘Patio’

Terra Ceramics ‘Patio’
made in Australia, c.1965

Terra Ceramics was a pottery run by Bernhard Fiegel, a Dutch-trained potter who immigrated to Australia after the second world war. Like much of my Australian collection, the pottery was in Ashfield [and then Greenacre]- very close to my own locale in Sydney. His pottery produced art pieces, under both the names Terra Ceramics and Terama. The pieces were hand-worked in shape, and then handpainted.

Terra Ceramics was proudly Australian, but I think you can see in these ‘Patio’ pieces, and in another collection ‘Daisy’ featured on this blog, that Fiegel’s Dutch heritage is evident in the motifs. Very modernist, and together with the asymmetrical shapes – very funky and very 60s!

The pottery produced art pieces from the early 60s to the early 80s, so was in production for less than twenty years. This set comprises a teardrop plate, a wall pocket-vase and a pair of – funky-shaped plates. Like many pieces produced in Terra Ceramics in the early days, these have a simple ‘Patio’ backstamp.

All pieces are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU75

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Barometer [sold]

60s barometer,
made in Tasmania, Australia

This is a fabulous wall barometer- and temperature gauge- made from blackwood timber, in the shape of Tasmania.

The barometer was a wedding gift to a couple in the 60s – and has faithfully recorded the air pressure [barometer] and air temperature [thermometer] since then. I particularly like the fonts used for the barometer – it is very old school, where each condition has its own curlicue lettering: ‘stormy, rain, change, fair, very dry.’ That last one is -of course- referring to wit.

In excellent working order, and ready to hang, the barometer is for sale: $AU45

Lomography

Debonair camera, made in Hong Kong 1967
Observer books, published 1958- 1975

I love old cameras – which now have a new life as lomography cameras. This Debonair “all plastic” camera was made in the 50s- it takes 120 film, and had a ‘super lens no. 809’.

It’s a point-and-shoot camera, fixed f/8 lens. Luckily 120mm film is still available – and – did I mention that lomography photos are uber cool?

Meanwhile, I also collect Observer books. This lovely series [1-100] started in the UK with no.1 British Birds published in 1937; and to collect all 100 in series is a prise.

Here we have a couple of my doubles:
1          Birds                1971
11        Aircraft             1958
21        Automobiles    1975
41        Heraldry          1966

However- you have already seen that the first in the series has been reprinted under many titles, and dates. And- to add to the collector enthusiasm- real enthusiasts only collect nos. 1 – 79, when the outer cover became hardback [with an image, no less.] So gauche.

Some Observer collectors just collect every edition of one published number. Some Observer collectors collect the first editions of every title. The rest of us are happy to have as many of the 1- 100 series in our collections.

The Debonair camera is for sale: $AU18
Observers [with dust jackets]: AU$10 each

O Canada!

Timber wall plaques,
made in Hong Kong 1960s

O Canada! Moose and squirrels [national animals] and cliché all around! If this was an Australian homage- it would be aboriginals and kangaroos. But that gilt is universal in its 3D kitschiness – I do so love it.

The timber in the first plaque is real- while only laminate in the second. But the 3D reality- really, does it get any better? For lovers of kitsch, no matter where you live! Imagine a whole wall – a collection of these babies….

Both plaques are in good vintage condition, and ready to hang. And they are for sale: $AU25

60s moneyboxes

60s moneyboxes
made in Australia

A collection of unused – as new – money boxes from the 60s; from banks now long gone.

The elephant money box is Bank Commonwealth [now, after many reiterations- the Commonwealth Bank] – it had the motto ‘get with the strength” [and hence, the elephant.]

Donald Duck is from The Wales Bank of NSW Savings Bank Ltd- and after that crazy, convoluted name, it’s no wonder they choose a Disney icon for their money box.

Wonderfully, both money boxes instruct the saver to take the box “when full to have money credited to their account – and – receive a new moneybox”.

I guess with digital banking nowadays nobody uses cash- let along saves it in a moneybox. Except for moneybox collectors – they will love these! [I have others on my site…search blog posts below.]

The 6 [new] moneyboxes are for sale: $AU60

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Rustic 60s Dutch scene

Dutch scene, ceramic wall hanging
made in Japan 1960s

Here is a fabulous 3D ceramic wall hanging: a lovely Dutch scene, made, you know in Japan in the 60s. A bit of cross-cultural referencing.

It’s ready to hang- with hole and wire on the back…but can stand on its own two feet too. Very cleverly, those weird crossed logs on the base are legs!

The whole thing is 180 x 130mm, by 30mm deep. Hang or stand – the choice it up to you!

The Dutch scene is for sale: $AU35

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Retro novelty plates

Retro novelty platesRetro novelty plates
made in England [?] c. 1960s

Corny or what?

CONGRATULATIONS i’m so HOPPY for you!
drop me a Lion will you?
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to you…happy birthday…[this sung by a crow-postman]
DON’T CROAK get well QUICK

Well, OK, that last one is a little suspect. Not so much corny as bordering on tactless.

Following on from a recent post featuring comic lawn bowlers [see below] – another subject ripe for hilarity, these novelty plates appeal to me in the same manner. The screwball graphics and expressions – sort of sums up the swinging 60s! I can’t image them being made today.

The plates are unmarked, but I think they are English in origin- the person from whom I purchased them believed so. If anybody knows anything more about these novelty plates, I’d love to hear from you.

For sale: $AUD60

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