Rustic 60s Dutch scene

Dutch scene, ceramic wall hanging
made in Japan 1960s

Here is a fabulous 3D ceramic wall hanging: a lovely Dutch scene, made, you know in Japan in the 60s. A bit of cross-cultural referencing.

It’s ready to hang- with hole and wire on the back…but can stand on its own two feet too. Very cleverly, those weird crossed logs on the base are legs!

The whole thing is 180 x 130mm, by 30mm deep. Hang or stand – the choice it up to you!

The Dutch scene is for sale: $AU35

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Retro novelty plates

Retro novelty platesRetro novelty plates
made in England [?] c. 1960s

Corny or what?

CONGRATULATIONS i’m so HOPPY for you!
drop me a Lion will you?
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to you…happy birthday…[this sung by a crow-postman]
DON’T CROAK get well QUICK

Well, OK, that last one is a little suspect. Not so much corny as bordering on tactless.

Following on from a recent post featuring comic lawn bowlers [see below] – another subject ripe for hilarity, these novelty plates appeal to me in the same manner. The screwball graphics and expressions – sort of sums up the swinging 60s! I can’t image them being made today.

The plates are unmarked, but I think they are English in origin- the person from whom I purchased them believed so. If anybody knows anything more about these novelty plates, I’d love to hear from you.

For sale: $AUD60

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Studio glass paperweights

60s studio glass paperweightsStudio glass paperweights
made in Australia, c. 1960s

These two paperweights show the 60s fascination with the ‘controlled bubbles’ glass technique. Controlled bubbles turned up in objects as diverse as vases, ashtrays and objects de art.  And paperweights.

Paperweights seem slightly redundant in these days of the ‘paperless’ office. But how lovely do these studio glass pieces look backlit on the windowsill? The pig paperweight has a deep blue interior and graduated bubbles and the round paperweight has a deep red interior and random bubbles. Click on the image for a larger view and admire the colours and bubbles!

Both pieces are unsigned, which is not unusual in art pieces of the 60s, but I have it on good authority that the pieces are Australian. Murano glass in Italy, and art glass makers in France, Britain and America were all producing controlled bubbled pieces in the 60s.

There are many paperweight collectors out there [check out www.paperweight.org] and museums dedicated to collecting and exhibiting paperweights. From the Paperweight Collectors Association I learnt that there are three periods of paperweight collecting:

The Classic Period [1840-1880] – mostly French made
The Folk Art Period [1880-1940] and
The Contemporary Period [1940 to present]

A very venerable history! These two very collectible paperweights are for sale: $AUD105

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Jetset- jet….- set….

Jetset solid state radio & phonograph
made in Japan 1969

The radio and phonograph work on this portable turntable, which has the standard 33 and 45 settings, but I suspect a new stylus would improve the sound quality substantially. I like the way the phonograph arm is recessed into the body of the player, you can just see the round metal section that houses the needle, to the middle right of the housing. How good would it be to take it on a picnic and play some old vinyl?

The Jetset runs on mains power – or- takes 4 x c size batteries- it is good to go, or on the go.

The aluminium knobs are a little scuffed- probably from 40 years of use, but other than that, this lovely orange portable radio/turntable is good to go.  For sale: $AUD95

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Australian linens [sold]

Australian linens
made in Australia, 1960s-70s

Here is a selection of Australian souvenir tea towels from the 60s and 70s. I love the colours and graphics of these linens- and since they have never been used [they are ‘new old stock’]- they remain vibrant. As souvenirware, the graphics are of Australian towns and feature Australian flora and fauna. Wattle, grevillea and koalas abound.

I bought these tea towels with the intention of making cushion covers [see examples in posts, below] – but came to the realisation that actually I have far too many and nobody could actually use a thousand pillows, not even in the most optimistic of circumstances.

The set comprises ten ‘as new’ linens, and they are for sale: $AU50

Donald Clark placemats

'Cigarette' ashtray & Daniel Clark placeats‘Fish’ placemats by Donald Clark,
made in Australia 1960s

The Australian artist – cum graphic designer- Donald Clark is having a resurgence right now. The pattern on these linen placemats is [unsurprisingly] ‘Fish’ and the limes and greys and very funky 60s-ness reminded me of this 60s ashtray. There are four placemats in the set, all with Donald’s signature.

Yes- that’s an ironic 60s ashtray that features cigarettes on a painters easel. Surrounded by abstract art forms, in a funky 60s shape, that’s an astray that I can enjoy. [Plus it’s never been used and would make a great pin dish.]

As an ode to the funky 60s, this set is for sale: $60

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Fat Lava

Scheurich pottery,
made in West Germany 1960-70s

I have come to embrace the ‘fat lava’ craze for West Germany pottery only recently. One thing that helped was seeing the pottery in its homeland when I visited Berlin- and another thing that has helped has been time; I grew up with this stuff and hated it as a youngster!

‘Fat lava’ refers to the glaze type which is typically chunky and classically 70s in form and colour. The pieces shown here are from our personal collection – we decided to collect in orange and red. There are a million varieties of these shapes in every conceivable colour variation…but due to popularity and [crazy collectors] they are becoming harder to find.

One of my favourite collectors is someone who has collected the one Scheurich shape and form – [it happens to be the middle of the red pieces shown here] and has over 70 varieties of it. They look fantastic displayed together – this is a case where more- IS more!

Myott #60sstyle

Myott ‘Camilla’ pottery
made in England, 1960s

Myott Pottery was established by two brothers, Ashley and Sydney Myott in 1898, in Staffordshire in England. The pottery continues today- although it has changed hands – and names- numerous times since.

Myott pottery is very collectable; especially art deco pieces from the turn of the century which now command hundreds of pounds. This work, ‘Camilla’ is ‘refined ironstone’ from the 60s. It’s starting to be collectable, due to the Myott name, and the general interest in 60s pottery [especially floral pottery.]

Camilla came in the two colourways shown: pink and yellow. The large oval platter in pink has a matching mug [not in image] and the boxed pin dishes [never used – ‘as new’] evidence the yellow colourway.

It’s not know where the name ‘Camilla’ came from: I thought [as did many collectors] that Camilla was a derivation of Camellia – which is one of the flowers of the motif. Maybe it’s just a woman’s name- maybe…it was named for the future Queen of England?

This collection is for sale: $AU55 [including coffee mug]

Blue Moon

Poole Blue Moon tea cups,
made in England 1960-1975

Poole is a very well known pottery, which started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

These tea cups – very modern in shape and sans handle – are part of the Cameo range. The colour is ‘Blue Moon’ –a deep blue exterior, with a slightly off-white interior [pure white would be too stark…this off-white is just right.] The set of eight tea cups and saucers have the traditional mid-century Poole mark on each piece.

The cups don’t hold much tea – not that I have used them as such – the lovely colour and repetition of form has had them serve a purely decorative function. But they would make for a lovely tea party.

For sale: $AUD145
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Lotte

Figgjo ‘Lotte’ plate
made in Norway, 1960s

This design, part of Figgjo’s Turi-Design Lotte line, depicts the eponymous Lotte in garden settings. The design also comes in shades of green, and the whole dinner set including butter dish and salt and pepper shakers was made. The line was discontinued in the 80s and is now very collectable. Etsy and EBay have entire sections devoted to Lotte!

This dinner plate has some crazing to the outer glaze, but I think that just makes it more charming. Crazing doesn’t affect its use, and adds cred. It would be a nice idea to collect bits and pieces from both the blue and green collection and mix and match; like many things- the entire setting is quite overwhelming and less is definitely more!

The plate is for sale: $25

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