Framed rose print

Framed rose print, 60sFramed rose print
made in Australia 1960s

Kitsch to the max- this rose print has a bakelite frame. Roses are so evocative of the 60s – and the OTT retouched photo is so retouched it’s difficult to tell where the photo finishes and the retouching begins.

The rose print is only small- 100mm diameter, but boy the red/green/blue [technically ‘cyan’] palette packs a punch .I’ve styled the frame with a small dolly, also from the 60s. I had one of these…I remember the over-sized head and wild hairstyle.

The framed rose print is ready to hang, and is for sale: $AU15
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50s Atlas

Australasian WONDER ATLAS
published in Australia 1950s

Australasian WONDER ATLAS! An Atlas for the AIR AGE. NEW Up-to date Edition.

My partner and I collect Australian Atlases. Because: Maps. Kitsch. Graphs. Kitschy drawings. Idealised images of Australia in the 50s.

This one is a beauty!

It’s in fantastic vintage condition. Last week at our local primary school book fair we found another 50s Atlas. It has ink blobs on the cover, thumbed pages, scrawls from numerous children throughout, and the old library card in the front. It’s similarly fantastic- I love the use, wear and tear and obvious appeal that maps have.

If anyone has an old Australian Atlas- let me know!

Cast-iron shoe last

Cast iron shoe last [1920s]Cast-iron shoe last
made in Australia 1920s

This is a ‘dual’ cast-iron cobblers shoe last- there are two different shapes on which to stretch and shape leather to make shoes. Cast-iron was used as it maintains its shape when in contact with wet leather and the mechanical stresses of stretching and shaping shoes.

Nowadays these heavy items are used as book ends, door stops or simply as decorative industrial forms.

There is something very satisfying about repurposing an industrial antique- giving it a new purpose and lease of life- and the functional design of the last means it is stable either end up.

Pictured here with a pineapple- the shoe last lends gravitas to anything!

The cobblers last is for sale: $AUD45

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#Crystal Craft!!!

Crystal Craft, made in Australia 1970s

Crystal Craft has become uber trendy for collectors: it’s a resin-covered fabric that originated in Queensland in the 70s. These two pieces – turtle ashtray and dolphin wall plaque- feature ‘marine opal’ [aka polished abalone shell for New Zealand readers.] ….Although, clearly, marine opal sounds much better.

I take some comfort in knowing that while abalone was “taken by divers from the Pacific” [as Crystal Craft labels inform] at least the whole animal was used. The abalone shell polishes up a treat and looks great under resin!

The Crystal Craft turtle and dolphin are for sale: $AU35

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50s Japanese ramekins

Ramekins
made in Japan, 1950s

I’m not sure when ramekins became vintagey fashionable, but these are good examples from the 50s. With 50s styling and colours they were all collected singly to make a set of five [a typical Japanese set.]

Ramekins are great for small dishes, soups and for foods cooked directly in them [chocolate pudding comes to mind!]

Since this image was taken, I have added to the collection- ramekins with a powder pink and a pastel blue interior. Let me know your preferred mix!

The ramekins are for sale: $AU45 [set of 5]

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Craftsman pewter sugar bowl

Pewter sugar bowl
made in England 1926-1939

This beautiful ‘crow-pecked’ two-handled pewter sugar bowl was made by Craftsman, in England. It is marked on the base and evidences the lovely Arts & Crafts styling of the 1920s and 30s.

Pewter is a great material for foodstuffs- many tankards attest to the taste of a good ale- as it doesn’t rust or deteriorate. Give it a bit of a polish up and it’s good to go!

In researching this piece I found that typically sugar bowls of the 20s came without a lid. Sugar was never stored in it – it was just filled as necessary for a tea party, then emptied afterwards.

The sugar bowl is for sale: $AU35
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Vintage salt & pepper shakers

Vintage salt and pepper shakers
made in Japan 1950s

For all you kitsch lovers [myself included] and vintage salt and pepper shaker collectors: a delightful set from Japan in the form of fire engines.

Subtle differences in the forms/colours – and faces! -denote salt and pepper. And of course who doesn’t love a human face on their fire engine>

To fire fighter enthusiasts- and vintage salt and pepper shaker collectors- these are for you; for sale: $AU25

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Depression era hand-made scone-cutter

Depression era hand-made scone-cutter
Australia, 1930s

Depression era hand-made items are having somewhat of a resurgence at the moment. Especially kitchenalia; into which category this scone-cutter neatly fits.

It was made by someone in their kitchen [with the help of a soldering iron] in the 1930s. Scones were a simple flour-and-water batter cake so most depression era families relied on them to either bulk out their evening meal; or – with any luck- by adding jam the ‘cake’ became a sweet item for desert.

Scones – with jam AND cream became popular in the 1940s and 50s- after the depression- and as a direct influence from England. Clotted cream and scones served at high tea became good old Aussie scones with a cup of tea. Either way, the scone-cutter lived on and has been cutting scones for decades!

The scone-cutter is for sale: $AU15
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50s kitchen canisters

Eon bakelite kitchen canisters
made in Australia 1950s

This is a set of nested canisters- Sugar, Rice, Coffee in mint green, with the original labels still marvelously intact. The canisters- and the labels- are made from bakelite and the labels are affixed using simple bakelite pins; so it’s rare for the cursive script to have lasted nearly seventy years.

The set is in ‘mint’ green [as described in the original Eon promotional pamphlet] and the lids are still air-tight and the canisters fit for purpose. The whole set would comprise another two canisters- Flour and Sago…and…forgive me…I have made this joke before: Coffee is always the smallest whereas nowadays it would be the largest.

The nested Eon canisters are for sale: $AU85

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Housie

Housie game, NZ, 1959Holdson Products Housie,
made in Auckland NZ, 1959

The game of Housie is called Bingo in the UK- players fill in numerical spaces on their boards as a ‘caller’ randomly produces numbers and calls them out. A win is made when any line is filled vertically, horizontally or diagonally.

Yawn. Sounds tedious to me – but look at the beautifully made housie board, and the numerical discs are stamped timber. And the graphics on the box…beautiful.

The box has its previous owner’s name ‘Cantwell’ inscribed on it – and a price tag of $2:50. My- how prices have changed!

Etsy and Pinterest are replete with artistic repurposing of Housie boards and numbers- what could you make of this collection?

The Housie game is for sale: $AU40

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