Pudding bowls

Fowler Ware pudding bowls,
made in Australia 1940s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This image shows the range of colours and sizes the pudding bowls were made in – and other posts evidence the rest! [I have collected a number of Fowler Ware pudding bowls….] The bowls and are still fit for purpose : I received a lovely christmas pudding made in one of these bowls- and after eating the pudding – I got to keep the bowl!

The large crimson and medium grey bowl are for sale : $AUD25 & $AU15 [or $30 for the pair.]

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Carlton Ware ‘contemporary ware’

Carlton Ware leaf dishes and salt & pepper shakersCarlton Ware ‘Contemporary Ware’ dishes and salt and pepper shakers, made in England 1951-1961

Many people are familiar with the botanically-themed Carlton Ware ceramics [and having a background in horticulture, I am quite ‘familiar’ with them myself.]  Various daisy/foxglove/wild rose motifs were made in the 30s, 40s and continuing into the 50s, but in 1951 a modernist theme emerged.  These leaf-shaped dishes and cubic salt and pepper shakers are an example of this and were dubbed ‘contemporary’ ware.

The four monochrome dishes have a wonderful abstract leaf shape, and so appeal to me. I also like the austerity and the somewhat obtuse cube-shaped shakers. These pieces are now quite hard to come by, and are all in perfect condition.

For sale: $AUD150

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Blue Moon

Poole Blue Moon tea cups,
made in England 1960-1975

Poole is a very well known pottery, which started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

These tea cups – very modern in shape and sans handle – are part of the Cameo range. The colour is ‘Blue Moon’ –a deep blue exterior, with a slightly off-white interior [pure white would be too stark…this off-white is just right.] The set of eight tea cups and saucers have the traditional mid-century Poole mark on each piece.

The cups don’t hold much tea – not that I have used them as such – the lovely colour and repetition of form has had them serve a purely decorative function. But they would make for a lovely tea party.

For sale: $AUD145
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40s porcelain figurine

Porcelain figurine, Japan, 1940sPorcelain figure,
made in Japan 1940s

This is quite a large figurine of a little girl and her duck; its 110mm high and unusually detailed for porcelain made in the 40s. It would have been made as part of the huge export market that sprang up in Japan imitating much older [and venerable] porcelain manufacturers in England.

This piece is unsigned so manufacturer is unknown, but the figurine has been made to replicate those of the well-known figurine maker, Beswick. So, it’s a repro piece from the 40s!

I’m not in the habit of collecting figurines; I occasionally do if I need a kitschy figurine for styling purposes. But I absolutely love this little girl and her duck, and her quintessentially 40s features. And I was rather taken with the detailing and the size of the piece- so unusual.

For porcelain collectors / figurine collectors; the figurine is for sale: $AU45

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Hanstan mugs

Hanstan mugs, Australia, 1970sHanstan mugs
made in Australia, 1970s

Hanstan pottery was a collaboration between Hans Wright and Stan Burrage – hence Hanstan– that started in Victoria in 1962. The pottery continued to make domestic ware pottery well into the 1980s. All Hanstan pottery was hand-signed [in quite florrid, 70s style] on the base- as are these mugs.

Hanstan also made stoneware spice containers- with cork lids- I have featured some previously in the white/brown colourway.  These mugs are quite unusual since not many were made in the orange/brown glaze. [My gen y friend said they look like avocados…and- you know- he’s right!]

These [rare] mugs are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU45

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Pates table vases

Pates vases, 40s-50sPates vases
made in Sydney, Australia 1946-1958

I have waxed lyrical previously about my love of the ‘Australian’ green and brown hues of Sydney pottery of the post-war period…and here are some more examples from my collection. Pates pottery operated out of Belmore- an industrial suburb of inner-Sydney, from 1946 and only ceased production in 1990.

Here is a selection of Pates vases in brown/green hues; two ‘lotus’ vases and a ‘log’ vase. Like many Pates vases, these shapes came in a variety of colours to suit the late 40s, early 50s décor. I decided my personal collection would be these ‘Australian’ colours [reminiscent of the bushland] – rather than the baby blues and powder pink or pastel yellow tones; but have rather too many to use or display now.

This set of Pates vases is in excellent vintage condition, and is for sale: $AU65

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Pates wall vases

Pates wall vases, 40sPates wall vases
made in Sydney, 1948-1952

Pates pottery is one of the main areas in which I collect. If you’ve read my blog before, you’ll remember that Pates Pottery operated out of Belmore, Sydney from 1946 -1990 [and I have an affinity for between the wars pottery, especially potteries that were located near me in Sydney.] Pates’ designs and colours were influenced by the 1950s and 60s furnishing and domestic colour trends; and like many other pieces of this period, crimson and green or pink and green colourings abounded.

These wall pockets are made to be hung on the wall, so as to hold water and floral arrangements. The three shown here are: ‘sea scroll’ ‘gum leaf’ and ‘art deco’ [this despite the fact that it was made in the 50s.] The colours and forms are quite beautiful, and the three of them hung together is quite something.

I am now reluctantly parting with some of my Pates collection…I alas lack the wall space in which to display these vases to their full advantage. And they should be seen to their full advantage!

This set is for sale: $AUD90

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Aboriginal motif kitsch

50s Aboriginal motif s&p, jugAboriginal motif salt & pepper shaker sets, and small jug
made in Australia c.1950s

While none of these items has a maker’s mark, the salt and pepper shakers at the back are possibly by Terra Ceramics, and the round shakers to the left are possibly Florenz Pottery. The small jug is probably Studio Anna. All these potteries were making tourist and souvenir pottery by the 1950s, and these appropriated [and westernised] indigenous motifs were hugely popular. Post war arts and crafts saw a rise in the popularity of Australiana – replacing traditional English motifs with ‘Australian’ themes; invariably Aboriginal motif works were black, tan and white.

This group works well as a set, or could form the basis of a larger collection. The items on their own are very kitsch…but somehow when grouped the kitschness is subverted into a subtler aesthetic.

This set is for sale: $AU125

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Studio Anna [sold]

Studio Anna, cup & saucer, 1950sStudio Anna cup & saucer
made in Australia, 1950s

Studio Anna started their art pottery in 1953, in Marrickville [just near where I now live.] Unlike many other potteries in the area, Studio Anna commenced with making art pieces; rather than converting from industrial/commercial products as part of the cultural changes that the 50s ushered in.

Like Martin Boyd pottery, Studio Anna specialised in hand-painted ‘Australiana’ themes. Flora and fauna and local iconic sites were depicted – I have several Studio Anna pieces that feature local hotels [oh! the 50s glamour!] as they were sold as souvenirware.

This cup and saucer is no exception- depicting the ‘Dog on the Tuckerbox’, a local tourist attraction in the fine town of Gundagai. [I won’t go into the story of the DotT – I have previously on the blog since I seem to have quite a few kitschy things that pay homage to said dog.]

The cup and saucer are in excellent vintage condition, and shown here with a snowdome of the DotT- made around the same era. This set is for sale: $AU35

Lyndale Moss Pottery

Lyndale Moss pottery, 1950sLyndale Moss pottery
made in Melbourne, Australia 1950s

It’s Australia Day! Not celebrated or acknowledged by all Australians- but – who could resist this Australiana?

These are Lyndale Moss gum-leaf vases, and a eucalypt vase. It’s the 50s, and nationalism is starting to become a cultural force. Art potteries everywhere are forgoing the English rose for Australian-themed flora. And producing vases in all manner of colours [to suit the 50s décor]: pink, blue, yellow, black, spotted and drip-glazed: but for my money, the lovely matt-white is the best.

Lyndale didn’t sign the pottery- they relied on semi-permanent stickers [in gilt writing, no less] to note the maker. It’s rare that these stickers survived from the 50s, so if you find one with the sticker in-tact- you are sitting on a gold mine.

Happy Australia Day! Wherever and however you celebrate; these vases are for sale: $AU45

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