Bakewells tea canister

Bakewells tea canister
made in Australia 1925-1935

This fabulous ceramic kitchen canister is called ‘Beulah Ware’- named for Bakewell’s wife, Beulah. The fantastic ‘tea’ font and decoration is all art deco.

Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved from making bricks and pipes to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the 1920s, they were manufacturing vases [‘exclusive ware’] and domestic ware [kitchenalia, including canisters.]

The earthernware canisters came in a set of five: Flour, Sugar, Rice, Tea and the smallest, Sago. A full set of canisters is next to impossible for find now – and originally, they came in this pastel green, a pastel yellow and a baby blue.

You may remember that I found the ‘Flour’ canister, sans lid- and now use it as a vase [see post, below.] And that just recently I posted a set of matching graduated jugs- same hand-coloured green glaze and with the same art deco styling.

The tea canister is in fantastic vintage condition, and is for sale: $AU65

Buy Now

Bakewells jugs

Bakewells graduated jugs
made in Australia 1930s

Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved away from making industrial ceramic products -like bricks and pipes- to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the early 30s Bakewells was making pudding bowls and graduated jugs in multi colours-  all to meet the insatiable demand of the new middle class. Bakewells is now very well known and very collectible.

This is an image from my own kitchen [and kitchenalia collection]- but I draw your attention to the Bakewells graduated jugs in green on the top shelf. I have just recently added to this collection – and find I have no more room to display it: so for sale are three green graduated jugs: similar to the first three of the four jug set seen here. You only need find the fourth- smallest- to create a set.

The jugs, being made in the 30s, have art deco flourishes: the shape, handle and applied decoration are all deco inspired. And the jugs are functional, as well as beautiful: we use ours to serve sauces and gravies [especially if we make art deco gravies. Only kidding- that sounds horrible!]

The three green graduated jugs are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU95

Buy Now

Australiana Kitchenalia [sold]

bakewells jug & bowl, fowler ware jugFowler Ware jugs & pudding basin
made in Australia 1940s

This set is a monochrome collection of Fowler Ware jugs and pudding bowl- in a creamy, off-white. Collecting in a single colour is quite dramatic, and these pieces look fantastic in a white or neutral toned kitchen. I was inspired by a friend who has about 15 off-white bowls sitting on the top of her kitchen cupboards- in that space below the ceiling.

These pieces are stoneware, and from the Fowler Ware ‘Utility’ range – perhaps off-white wasn’t as glamorous as the coloured pieces [see post below] and could be used every day.

The beauty of the off-white bowl is that any fruit/food/kitchen implement stored in them looks fantastic. And as mentioned in previous posts- the bowls are still great for…cooking puddings!

For sale: $AU80

Bakewells canister

Bakewells 'flour' canister, 1930sBakewells ‘Flour’ canister,
made in Sydney, Australia 1930s

This is a fabulous- and large- ceramic canister from the 30s. Originally from a set of five- Flour, Sugar, Rice, Sago and Tea – this canister is missing its lid. Hence, it is acting as a vase.

How art deco is the ‘flour’ font? The set was produced in the 30s so was a little late for art deco : but I like the play on words: Flour/Flower.

The canister is made from earthenware, and the sets also came in blue, yellow and white. It’s incredibly rare to find an intact set of five – but – should anyone have the flour lid- I have the flour canister!

Jugs [sold]

40s jugs: Bakewells & Fowler Ware2 jugs
made in Sydney, Australia 1940s

Here we have two jugs: the first – a green stripey jug made by Bakewells, and the second a pale yellow Fowler Ware jug- both made in local factories from whence I hail. Now no longer with us, I still like to collect from the potteries that were once in the inner-west of Sydney.

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their graduated pudding bowls and jugs were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand. Fowler Ware is now much sought after. This is a 2 pint jug – as attested by the incised backstamp.

Bakewells operated out of Erskineville- very close to where we now live. Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved from making bricks and pipes to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the 1920s, Bakewells was manufacturing vases [‘exclusive ware’] and domestic ware [pudding bowls and jugs] in a range of sizes and colours. This jug with its banded decoration calls to mind Cornish Ware;  a deliberate evocation

The two jugs are for sale: $AU90

40s Bakewells

Bakewells bowl and jugBakewells mixing bowl and jug
made in Sydney, Australia 1930s

Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved from making industrial pieces [bricks and pipes] to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the early 30s Bakewells was making pudding bowls and banded mixing bowls in multi colours- all to meet the insatiable demand of the new middle class.

Bakewells was in Bexley, in Sydney and is now very well known and very collectible. Particularly collectible are the banded bowls like this blue one- they can also be found in yellow, purple and green. The matching jug- with its 30s post-art-deco styling is made with the same off-white glaze. Perfect for the contemporary kitchen!- or the Bakewells enthusiast.

The bowl and jug are for sale: $125

Buy Now

30s Bakewells Kitchenalia

Bakewells bowl and jugBakewells mixing bowl and jug
made in Sydney, Australia 1930s

Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved from making industrial pieces [bricks and pipes] to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the early 30s Bakewells was making pudding bowls and banded mixing bowls in multi colours- all to meet the insatiable demands of the new middle class.

Bakewells was in Bexley, in Sydney and is now very well known and very collectible. Particularly collectible are the banded bowls like this blue one- they can also be found in yellow, purple and green. The matching jug- with its 30s post-art-deco styling is made with the same off-white glaze. Perfect for the contemporary kitchen!

The bowl and jug are for sale: $125

Buy Now

Bakewells mixing bowl

Bakewells mixing bowlBakewells mixing bowl
made in Sydney, Australia 1930s

Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved away from making industrial ceramic products -like bricks and pipes- to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the early 30s Bakewells was making pudding bowls and nested mixing bowls in multi colours-  all to meet the insatiable demand of the new middle class. Bakewells is now very well known and very collectible.

Large mixing bowls like this one, with a pouring lip, are now rare. The size, its incised rings – and the fact that it’s in tact without any chips are in its favour. I think it looks great with these flowers…although not its primary function –  it just goes to show how many uses these bowls have.

This mixing bowl is for sale: $AUD85

Buy Now

Art Deco Vases

Newtone vasesStyling with art deco vases

From the sublime to the ridiculous [which is a phrase that I use more often than is considered necessary] – here is a selection of my partner’s Newtone art deco vases.

While I collect – and love- kitschy Australiana from the 40s to the 60s, my lovely partner has much more refined sensibilities and loves and collects Australian pottery from the 20s- 40s. Here is a small sample from her collection.

Newtone pottery was produced by Bakewells, in Erskineville- very close to where we now live. Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved from making bricks and pipes to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the 1920s, Newtone was manufacturing vases [‘exclusive ware’] and domestic ware [pudding bowls – ok, I admit it, I have a few…]

These vases showcase the green and brown colourings and art deco shapes and vase sizes. They look gorgeous amassed together. And look terrific holding flowers!