Pudding bowls

Fowler Ware pudding bowls,
made in Australia 1940s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This image shows the range of colours and sizes the pudding bowls were made in – and other posts evidence the rest! [I have collected a number of Fowler Ware pudding bowls….] The bowls and are still fit for purpose : I received a lovely christmas pudding made in one of these bowls- and after eating the pudding – I got to keep the bowl!

The large crimson and medium grey bowl are for sale : $AUD25 & $AU15 [or $30 for the pair.]

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60s jigsaws

60s jigsaws
made in Australia

Two delightful jigsaws, made from timber, in Australia in the 60s. The first was made by Louise Rayner Toys; the second – a teaching clock, is unmarked. Both jigsaws came from a nursery school, who purchased them in the 60s but now deemed them too ‘old-fashioned’ for today’s children. So – hello – retro!

I do remember playing with a clock jigsaw when I was at nursery school- the plastic handles are adjustable and have to be moved in order to get all the pieces in. And I just love the funky glasses on the coloured jigsaw- which is very ‘analogue’ with a clock and a rotary telephone!

Both jigsaws are in excellent vintage condition; with very little wear and are for sale: $AU45

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50s Australian glassware

Australian glassware, 1950sAustralian glassware
made in 1950s

I am a huge fan of Australian glassware: and collect it when I can.

Here we have:
tri-pouring graduated ½ pint jug [pours from three sides]
Kodak developing chemical graduated glass
and seven medicine graduated glasses.

All pieces were made rough-and-ready; several have ‘bubbles’ in the glass, and evident seam lines. But no chips or cracks- all these lovely glasses can be used today for their original – or indeed – new purposes.

Because that’s what glass is like. Unlike plastic, it does not allow molecular transfer – so when heated or filled with foodstuffs or chemicals- there is no movement between the two.

And being made in the 50s- all the graduated measurements are imperial; in relief in the glass, or transfer printed. A lovely snap-shot of Australian glassware.

This set of Australian glassware is for sale: $AU95

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Royal visit glasses

Royal visit glasses [Australia, 1954]Royal visit glasses
made in Australia, 1954

Not difficult to gauge the age of these glasses: they are printed on them. Her Majesty visited the colonies in 1954 – a year after her coronation in 1953.

Australia is still a part of the Commonwealth, with her Maj as our Queen. We had a referendum to become a republic in 1999 – it was defeated – and the debate still rages.

So- all this is to say- there are a lot – A LOT- of monarchists in our midst. Monarchists who collect ER memorabilia. Here we have two shot glasses, and a pair of drinking glasses. The drinking glasses have had more wear [more toasts!] and some of the gilt is worn. The shot glasses, meanwhile, look pristine.

Just saying; monarchists prefer to toast her Maj with beer, rather than vodka. It’s empirical!

The Royal Visit glasses are for sale: $AU55

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Wiltshire ‘Burgundy’ coffee & tea set

Wilshire 'Burgundy' coffee & tea set [Australia, 1972]Wiltshire ‘Burgundy’ tea & coffee set
made in Australia 1972

This great retro set of coffee pot, teapot, creamer and serving tray has a funky shape, satin finish to the 18/8 stainless steel and a fantastic embossed pattern. It was produced in 1972, and the Burgundy pattern extended to serving ware too: sugar bowl, sauce boat, salad bowl & servers, salt and pepper shakers and cutlery.

I have collected the matching cutlery too. I am a sucker for good Australian design! [For evidence, see blog posts below.]

In researching the history of the Wiltshire ‘Burgundy’ I came across an original advertisement for it in the Sydney Morning Herald– this was the must have service of the 70s. Anecdotally, everyone I speak to remembers this set being in their beach shack- it has a ‘holiday house’ vibe.

BUT- the best part of this collecting story: this tea & coffee set came from an order of Nuns who donated it to the second-hand shop I bought it from: apparently they hadn’t used it since it was given them in the 70s and had decided- forty years later- to clear their cupboards. I love the idea of Nuns being given funky 70s stainless steel and deciding instead to go with their English china.

The Burgundy tea and coffee set is for sale: $AU105
The Burgundy cutlery is also in superb condition- it doesn’t look like it’s been used; and it’s for sale: $AUD75 [place setting for 6; 18 pieces.]

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Golfing tee-spoons

Silver plated 'golf club' teaspoons, Australia, 1960sSilver plated ‘golf club’ teaspoons
made in Australia 1960s

I’ve researched these silver teaspoons, with their distinctive golf club finials- they are engraved with ‘CCC’. As near as I can tell, this would be Campbelltown Catholic Club, a golf club in – you guessed it- Campbelltown.

The set of six spoons are hallmarked for silver plate, made in Australia, in the 60s. They would suit a golf tragic or any golfing collector. So far I feel I have been of service to the golfing tragics- I have featured champagne flutes from the 50s [won in a golf tournament]; novelty glasses with golfing cartoons from the 40s, novelty plates with golfing cartoons from the 50s, golfing nip glasses from the 50s [where the level of alchol is measured thus: 2 over, 1 over, Birdie, Eagle], a Barbie doll complete with her golfing accoutrements, and – a hallmarked silver cup inscribed: “Selangor Golf Club Services Trophy 1958, Winners D.C. Hurst & L.M. Riedel” on a bakelite base.

I myself am not a golf tragic [I don’t have the patience/will power/co-ordination required.] But I know there are plenty of people who are.

The set of teaspoons came in this box, but it’s clearly not the original [it’s marked ‘Made in England’.]  The set is for sale: $AU60 [box included for shipping purposes.]

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Yarn Winder

Yarn Winder, made in Australia 1960sYarn Winder
made in Australia, 1960s

This yarn winder- new in box- was manufactured by Silver, and made in the 60s. It comes with a table-fixing clamp, and yarn guide and the original operating instructions. The winder has a pink metal base [powder pink] and the internal winding mechanism and winder are all metal. For all your yarn winding needs!

Okay, so few of us wind yarn now-a-days; but there are lots of sewing/knitting paraphernalia collectors who would love this winder. It’s never been used and it’s rare to find one in its original box. The box has some wear [see image] but the winder itself is as new.

The winder is for sale: $AU45

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Hanstan mugs

Hanstan mugs, Australia, 1970sHanstan mugs
made in Australia, 1970s

Hanstan pottery was a collaboration between Hans Wright and Stan Burrage – hence Hanstan– that started in Victoria in 1962. The pottery continued to make domestic ware pottery well into the 1980s. All Hanstan pottery was hand-signed [in quite florrid, 70s style] on the base- as are these mugs.

Hanstan also made stoneware spice containers- with cork lids- I have featured some previously in the white/brown colourway.  These mugs are quite unusual since not many were made in the orange/brown glaze. [My gen y friend said they look like avocados…and- you know- he’s right!]

These [rare] mugs are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU45

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Pates table vases

Pates vases, 40s-50sPates vases
made in Sydney, Australia 1946-1958

I have waxed lyrical previously about my love of the ‘Australian’ green and brown hues of Sydney pottery of the post-war period…and here are some more examples from my collection. Pates pottery operated out of Belmore- an industrial suburb of inner-Sydney, from 1946 and only ceased production in 1990.

Here is a selection of Pates vases in brown/green hues; two ‘lotus’ vases and a ‘log’ vase. Like many Pates vases, these shapes came in a variety of colours to suit the late 40s, early 50s décor. I decided my personal collection would be these ‘Australian’ colours [reminiscent of the bushland] – rather than the baby blues and powder pink or pastel yellow tones; but have rather too many to use or display now.

This set of Pates vases is in excellent vintage condition, and is for sale: $AU65

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Art glass paperweights

Studio glass paperweights, 1960sStudio glass paperweights, made in Australia, c1960s

These three paperweights show the 60s fascination with the ‘controlled bubbles’ glass technique. Controlled bubbles turned up in objects as diverse as vases, ashtrays and objects de art. And paperweights.

Paperweights seem slightly redundant in these days of the ‘paperless’ office. [nb: my drawing office is anything BUT paperless!] But the art glass pieces look fantastic back-lit on a windowsill, or as here- against a white wall. Click on the image for a larger view and admire the colours and bubbles!

All three pieces are unsigned, which is not unusual in art pieces of the 60s, but I have it on good authority that the pieces are Australian. There are many paperweight collectors out there [check out www.paperweight.org] and museums dedicated to collecting and exhibiting paperweights. From the Paperweight Collectors Association I learnt that there are three periods of paperweight collecting:

The Classic Period [1840-1880] – mostly French made paperweights
The Folk Art Period [1880-1940] and
The Contemporary Period [1940 to present.]

A very venerable history! This set of collectible paperweights is for sale: $AUD125

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