50s earrings

50s earrings50s earrings
made in Australia

This is a set of six pairs of earrings- all screw-on or clip-ons. I started collecting 50s jewellery in the 80s- I would wear them with my op-shop bought clothes to university. The 80s was a time that fashion forgot – and although I was wearing ‘old’ stuff- at least it was well designed and didn’t sport leopard print or that horrible olive/gold colour scheme.

Now 50s clothes and jewellery is very collectible. These earrings are beautifully designed and made and stand up well against modern costume jewellery. There’s a colour / diamante to suit every outfit!

For sale: $AUD90

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Bakelite perfume-holder

Bourjois bakelite owl perfume-holder
made in England, 1930s

I am very interested in bakelite, as you know: and blue bakelite is the rarest. I came across this owl-shaped perfume holder, and though it is a little time-worn, I had to have him.

The owl was made to open at the back to take a bottle of ‘Evening in Paris’ perfume. He would have been in every elegant ladies bag in the 30s. It’s made of ‘marbleised’ bakelite : and when you open it you can see the colour of the original [now eighty-year old] bakelite. But his eyes, hinges and feathery detail are all still intact.

The inscription on the back reads: ‘Bourjois, London-Paris, Reg No 825,003, Made in England’. I love the idea of a perfume-holder; no-one uses them these days. You are considered sophisticated if you walk around with perfume in your backpack. This owl harks back to the 30s- and days of glamour!

I’ve teamed the bakelite owl with a plastic telephone toy from the 50s. I kinda like the disparaging look on the owl’s face…

The bakelite perfume-holder is for sale: $AU40

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Golliwogs #70sstyle

Basic Soft Toys
by Sister Mary Bertrand, published by Reed, 1974, Wellington NZ

So – Sister Bertrand – shows you how to make golliwogs in 1974. I love this book! The goofiness, the un-PC quality, the terrible shot of St. Bertrand on the cover.

And I confess, I got her name mixed up with the flying nun – who was Sister Betrille.

Nineteen soft toy patterns : “every pattern is actual size”! Wow and hurray! if only I had the time/emotional energy to make every pattern in this book. I would. If only to realise the 1974 kitschiness / Sister Betrand factor.

I am asking you, dear reader, and dear soft toy maker, to do this on my behalf. Go on – I know you want to.

Plus – soft toy makers in NZ – I have thrown down the gauntlet. The soft toy gauntlet.

This wonderful tome is for sale: $AU15

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Australian linens [sold]

Australian linens
made in Australia, 1960s-70s

Here is a selection of Australian souvenir tea towels from the 60s and 70s. I love the colours and graphics of these linens- and since they have never been used [they are ‘new old stock’]- they remain vibrant. As souvenirware, the graphics are of Australian towns and feature Australian flora and fauna. Wattle, grevillea and koalas abound.

I bought these tea towels with the intention of making cushion covers [see examples in posts, below] – but came to the realisation that actually I have far too many and nobody could actually use a thousand pillows, not even in the most optimistic of circumstances.

The set comprises ten ‘as new’ linens, and they are for sale: $AU50

Purple reign!

Purple costume brooches, 50s, AustraliaPurple costume jewellery
made in Australia, 1950s

These are large, 50s costume brooches: all with atomic stylings and all featuring purple glass. They were made to make a bold statement – and I think you’ll agree they are still making quite the bold statement!

50s jewellery went out of fashion for a period in the 70s and 80s but is now retro enough to be coming back with a splash. I have always loved purple and collected these brooches one at a time until I had a triumvirate to display/offer them as a group.

The brooches would look great worn singly- but wow! would pack a punch worn altogether. They are all in great vintage condition, and are offered for sale: $75

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Hipster Christmas decorations

Knitted Christmas baubles, c 2013Hipster Christmas decorations
made in Sydney, Australia 2013

How cool are these Christmas baubles? Hand-knitted – in pure Australian wool-  these decorations will lend your Christmas tree some real hipster cred.

Made by a lovely Nanna using a 1970 knitting pattern, this set of 20 baubles is both environmentally sustainable and – quite hilarious. Environmentally sustainable because she used her left over wool pieces, and hilarious because she used her left over wool pieces [~not so much the red and green or tinselly colours.]

You’ve seen the urban art of knitted wraps around trees and poles – now see the knitted Christmas decorations! Christmas just got 1970 crafty!

The set of 20 [all different] Christmas baubles is for sale: $AUD40

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Glomesh bling

Glomesh purse, 1960Glomesh purse,
made in Sydney, 1960

Glomesh is an international brand that makes these instantly recognisable ‘chain-mail’ handbags and purses in white, silver and gold. The company was founded by Hungarian immigrants Louis and Alice Kennedy in Bondi, in 1958. The company continues today, without much variation from the original design ideal.

I am not a handbag person – BUT my sister is. She has a thing for Glomesh. It’s the tactile and blingy nature of the bags –a reaction she shares with many. Naturally I support her in her Australian-made ideal.

This is a very early purse- in gold- which has an internal label: “GLOMESH, Made in NSW, Australia”, which marks it as such. A few of the gold plates at the base are worn and a bit bent, but the purse is entire and its lining is intact.

This is a piece of Glomesh history: and it’s for sale: $AU45

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40s sewing caddy [sold]

1940s sewing caddy1940s sewing caddy
made in Australia

Readers! For you delectation and delight I present to you – a hand-made sewing caddy. As you can see in the images- the caddy is on casters and opens up to reveal a little cupboard [with bakelite handle]; cotton reel spool holders and various drawers for fabric and notions and such. What a beauty!

The real appeal of the caddy is the bow-fronted drawers, which are staggered to allow them to slot into one another when the caddy closes. A fantastic design. The timber cabinet has expressed mortice and tenon joints, attesting to its craftsmanship.

The casters are new- and quite spoil the rustic, hand-made appeal of the caddy- but they can easily be exchanged for some rough old industrial casters. The little cupboard door is a little wonky with age, but still closes and its hinges, etc are all original and working. I’m not sure of the timber, it’s an Australian fruit wood – but not sure which one. The caddy closes with a steel hinged latch, slightly rusted in suitable aged style.

The caddy could be used for all sorts of storage: when I first bought it I had visions of using it to style my collection; I have a ‘timber’ theme to all my images and I thought this would make a handsome backdrop. Alas, I haven’t used it thus- and now it is for sale.

For sale: $AUD175

70s coat hooks [sold]

Gedy coat hooks [1970s]gedy design coat hooks
made in Italy, 1970s

New in box – 70s coat hanger hooks, designed by Makio Hasuike for gedy design [cat. no: 2327.] The hooks come complete with steel baseplates and are ready to hang: each box contains a pair and there are four boxes: red, orange, white and brown; and also an extra orange and green hook- 10 hooks in all.

I bought these hooks from an old hardware store that was closing down- the boxes have been sitting in the storeroom since 1974 when they were purchased.

These hooks represent the best of 70s design: having a modular, streamline form, made from robust materials. The baseplate & fixings are concealed so the hook looks like it is cantilevered from the wall. The hooks have been designed to hang one way – to hang hats, or the opposite way to take two coats. They would look fantastic as a sequence along a contemporary white wall.

I don’t often pay homage to 70s design – but I think gedy got the design of these hooks right. The set of hooks is for sale: $AUD75

40s leather case

Ford Sherington caseFord Sherington leather case
made in Sydney, Australia 1940s

This delightful small leather case, with its funky 40s rounded shaping was made by Ford Sherington – a well-known purveyor of luxury leather goods in Sydney which started production in 1912 and continued until the mid- 70s. Interestingly the Ford Sherington company was started by a woman in 1912 – Ada Sherington- and in the 30s Ford Sherington created the now famous Globite school case which millions of Australian children took to school.

This case is made of crocodile leather, has a working sewn leather hinge and has a silver clasp- which is intact. The front of the case is embossed in gold with the initials – “J.W.”- quite coincidentally I also have a silver cigarette case with the same embossed initials…I don’t know any J.W.s but if you do- I have two great retro gifts for them!

Internally, the leather case is in great condition and has the original makers label [which is why I know it’s a Ford Sherington.] The case has only had one owner, for who it was embossed- and it’s in excellent condition.

The case is for sale: $AUD120

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