Fowler Ware jug [sold]

Fowler Ware jug,
made in Australia 1930s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWI, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their graduated pudding bowls & jugs were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This is a blue and white striped jug from the 30s; the blue and white colours resembled English Cornish Ware and were the premium pieces produced in the 20s and 30s. Every day pieces- ‘Cream Ware’ were made under the Fowler’ Utility’ label, while the blue and white pieces- coffee pots, pudding bowls and jugs- have a Fowler Ware & Sons backstamp.

This jug appears never to have been used: it is pristine inside and out. Quite a rare find.

The Fowler Ware jug is for sale: $AU75

Studio glass paperweights

60s studio glass paperweightsStudio glass paperweights
made in Australia, c. 1960s

These two paperweights show the 60s fascination with the ‘controlled bubbles’ glass technique. Controlled bubbles turned up in objects as diverse as vases, ashtrays and objects de art.  And paperweights.

Paperweights seem slightly redundant in these days of the ‘paperless’ office. But how lovely do these studio glass pieces look backlit on the windowsill? The pig paperweight has a deep blue interior and graduated bubbles and the round paperweight has a deep red interior and random bubbles. Click on the image for a larger view and admire the colours and bubbles!

Both pieces are unsigned, which is not unusual in art pieces of the 60s, but I have it on good authority that the pieces are Australian. Murano glass in Italy, and art glass makers in France, Britain and America were all producing controlled bubbled pieces in the 60s.

There are many paperweight collectors out there [check out www.paperweight.org] and museums dedicated to collecting and exhibiting paperweights. From the Paperweight Collectors Association I learnt that there are three periods of paperweight collecting:

The Classic Period [1840-1880] – mostly French made
The Folk Art Period [1880-1940] and
The Contemporary Period [1940 to present]

A very venerable history! These two very collectible paperweights are for sale: $AUD105

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50s Diana vases

Diana vases,
made in Australia 1950s

As you know, I collect Australian pottery made by Diana- the post-war pottery was situated very near where I now live in Sydney. I collect the ‘Australiana’ pottery in colours of eucalypt green and bark brown- but the same vase shape came in a multitude of colours to suit the changing interiors of post-war Australia.

Here are two posy vases- or ring vases- which display floating flowers [rather than stemmed flowers] and a small matching vase. The deep crimson and powder blue colours are SO 50s; but the geometric patterning on these vases harks back to the 20s and Art Deco. The same shaped vases were made well into the 70s, when they were handpainted [quite garishly, natch] with Australian flora.

Diana produced ‘art pottery’ from 1940 to 1975. The pottery is unique in that it only produced art and domestic pottery products, rather than having antecedents in industrial pottery. I have a number [she said, modestly] of Diana pieces featured on this blog; jugs, pudding bowls, ramekins, casserole dishes, platters, coffee pots…and vases.

This collection of vases is for sale: $AU75 [the small vase has original Diana sticker]

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Egg cups by Poole

tea & eggs 50s style!Poole egg cup set,
made in England 1954

Poole is a very well-known pottery; it started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. All Poole is now highly collectible- but I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

This Poole egg cup set is in the twintone colourway [THEIR term] ‘Seagull and Teal’. The teal makes for a nice connection with the tea caddy. The ’seagull’ is a lovely mottled pinky-creamy-colour. The five piece set is in excellent condition; the plate under the egg cups has circular indentations to help steady the cups.

Bushells tea caddies, tin and mass produced to mark commemorative occasions, are now quite sought after. Here we have her Maj, Prince Philip and both countries’ flags to mark Elizabeth’s coronation in 1953. This caddy has now sold.

The Poole egg cup set is for sale: $AU75

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Blue Moon

Poole Blue Moon tea cups,
made in England 1960-1975

Poole is a very well known pottery, which started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

These tea cups – very modern in shape and sans handle – are part of the Cameo range. The colour is ‘Blue Moon’ –a deep blue exterior, with a slightly off-white interior [pure white would be too stark…this off-white is just right.] The set of eight tea cups and saucers have the traditional mid-century Poole mark on each piece.

The cups don’t hold much tea – not that I have used them as such – the lovely colour and repetition of form has had them serve a purely decorative function. But they would make for a lovely tea party.

For sale: $AUD145
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Carlton Ware ‘contemporary ware’

Carlton Ware leaf dishes and salt & pepper shakersCarlton Ware ‘Contemporary Ware’ dishes and salt and pepper shakers, made in England 1951-1961

Many people are familiar with the botanically-themed Carlton Ware ceramics [and having a background in horticulture, I am quite ‘familiar’ with them myself.]  Various daisy/foxglove/wild rose motifs were made in the 30s, 40s and continuing into the 50s, but in 1951 a modernist theme emerged.  These leaf-shaped dishes and cubic salt and pepper shakers are an example of this and were dubbed ‘contemporary’ ware.

The four monochrome dishes have a wonderful abstract leaf shape, and so appeal to me. I also like the austerity and the somewhat obtuse cube-shaped shakers. These pieces are now quite hard to come by, and are all in perfect condition.

For sale: $AUD150

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Blue Moon

Poole Blue Moon tea cups,
made in England 1960-1975

Poole is a very well known pottery, which started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

These tea cups – very modern in shape and sans handle – are part of the Cameo range. The colour is ‘Blue Moon’ –a deep blue exterior, with a slightly off-white interior [pure white would be too stark…this off-white is just right.] The set of eight tea cups and saucers have the traditional mid-century Poole mark on each piece.

The cups don’t hold much tea – not that I have used them as such – the lovely colour and repetition of form has had them serve a purely decorative function. But they would make for a lovely tea party.

For sale: $AUD145
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Blue spotty pottery [sold]

50s blue spotted potteryBlue spotty ware
made in Australia 1950s

Today’s collection comes from a friend- who has been collecting 50s spotted ceramics since she was a design student in the 70s. No-one was collecting spotty things then- and she cleaned up! Now of course every one recognises 50s things as soon as a spot is sighted.

The shakers are in the classic ‘acorn’ shaping – and like the bowl, the spots are raised areas of glaze rather than merely an applied shape in the glaze.

Like the black and white spotted pottery- also collected by Maisy, and featured below -these pieces are unmarked. This isn’t unusual for 50s Australian pottery- and while literally thousands of spotty pieces were made it is increasingly difficult to find these pieces. The pieces are all in good condition without chips or cracks or crazing- which makes them even rarer.

Each piece is in great condition without cracks or chips [click on the image for a zoom image]- and are for sale: $AUD45

Airline travel bag

Orbitours travel bag, 1960sAirline travel bag
Made in Hong Kong, 1960s

Airline bags have become SO popular and collectable that there are now reproductions of classic Qantas bags- made in China, c. 2014- being sold for crazy prices on EBay. A REAL Qantas travel bag should cost in the order of $AU100 – but a repro? That should go for ten bucks [that’s 2 bucks for materials & assembly, 1 buck to ship it, and 7 dollars or 70% profit to the seller.] AND it should be clearly marked as a repro.

So- how to tell a fake? Well, take this Orbitour travel bag for example. It has its original sticker inside:

‘Nylon Coated Plastic
Made In Hong Kong”.

Sporting an original sticker, and made in Hong Kong [rather than China]; plus – it has some stitching missing on one handle and a little on the zip. Repros are startlingly perfect, looking like a facsimile of the original. You can’t fake age!

And the colour- that super cobalt blue with slightly wonky white font – it’s correct for the 60s.

I’ve teamed the Orbitours bag with an old 40s school case. It’s had some repair work- new rivets hold a new internal timber frame to the lid, but the locks and hinges and metal handle are all still original and working. It was made by the ‘American Bag Stores, Travelling Goods Specialists’, in Australia [as described on the internal label.] Talk about an original!

The Orbitours bag [Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane] is for sale: $AU55
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The old school case is for sale: $AU45
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70s water jugs

70s whiskey water jugsWhiskey water jugs,
made in Australia, England and France, 1970s

These are whiskey water jugs – and they are both practical and highly collectable. They are ‘advertisement’ jugs mass produced and given away to pubs –not sold to the public- with the idea that the public would be so impressed by the glamour of having water added to their drink by a ‘branded jug’ that they would continue to order their brandy/whisky by name. Ah! the70s, when advertising and impressing people was so easy!

The White Horse Scotch Whiskey jug was made by Wade; the Haig Scotch Whiskey jug was made by Carlton Ware- and has a beautiful integral handle and fantastic 70s square-shaped styling. The last jug is now quite rare: a Marie Brizard Liquers de France, made by Digoin – with a fabulous pouring spout.

All jugs are in fantastic vintage condition- with the slight exception of the Marie Brizard, which has some wear to the print on the reverse of the jug.

I also have some 60s whiskey jugs: a Rene Briand Brandy jug marked ‘Ceramica E. Piloa, Carpignano S.’ and a McCallum’s jug with the usual Wade branding. You really can’t have too many whiskey jugs!

These jugs are for sale: $AUD45 each.