Bakewells jugs

Bakewells graduated jugs
made in Australia 1930s

Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved away from making industrial ceramic products -like bricks and pipes- to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the early 30s Bakewells was making pudding bowls and graduated jugs in multi colours-  all to meet the insatiable demand of the new middle class. Bakewells is now very well known and very collectible.

This is an image from my own kitchen [and kitchenalia collection]- but I draw your attention to the Bakewells graduated jugs in green on the top shelf. I have just recently added to this collection – and find I have no more room to display it: so for sale are three green graduated jugs: similar to the first three of the four jug set seen here. You only need find the fourth- smallest- to create a set.

The jugs, being made in the 30s, have art deco flourishes: the shape, handle and applied decoration are all deco inspired. And the jugs are functional, as well as beautiful: we use ours to serve sauces and gravies [especially if we make art deco gravies. Only kidding- that sounds horrible!]

The three green graduated jugs are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU95

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Hanstan coffee pot

Hanstan coffee pot & mugs
made in Australia, 1970s

Hanstan pottery was a collaboration between Hans Wright and Stan Burrage – hence Hanstan- that started in Victoria in 1962. The pottery continued to make domestic ware pottery well into the 1980s. Hanstan collectors will know that the pottery is always two-tone: either matt white and mission brown, or 70s orange and misson brown. The brown part of the pottery is rough glazed to contrast with the smooth slip glaze of the other colour.

The coffee pot, collectors will also know – is now quite rare and hard to find. I have had the mugs and the matching sugar bowl for some time, and the coffee pot, completing the set, has only just been found. All pieces are in excellent vintage condition; the coffee pot is completely unstained and looks like it’s never been used.

I also have examples of Hanstan white/brown pottery- spice jars and a salt pig – elsewhere on this blog.

The Hanstan coffee set is for sale: $AU125

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Wild Rose toast rack

Shorter & Son ‘Wild Rose’ toast rack
made in England, 1940s

Today, for your delight – a ceramic 40s toast rack, with ‘wild rose’ pattern. I’ve teamed the rack with a fabulous picture of Mary- chosen for the complimentary colours, and because it looks like Mary is holding a sundae – sort of a food tie-in with the toast rack.

Religious iconography – especially vintage iconography- is always fascinating. I don’t understand any of the symbolism here- [and perhaps it’s just my fascination with deserts] – I do know it’s Mary due to her blue dress.

But back to the toast rack: Shorter and Son pottery was established in 1900 and finished production in 1964. By the 1940s- when this rack was made, Short and Son were known for their ‘novelty’ ceramic kitchenalia. These earthenware pottery pieces typically featured English flowers, and were:

“cleverly modelled and effectively decorated…” [to quote the Pottery Gazette, published March 1941.]

People collect toast racks. And people collect pottery featuring flowers. Here’s a piece to suit everybody! The toast rack is in great vintage condition, and is for sale: $AU35

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Swinnertons Chelsea Blue

Swinnertons Chelsea Blue crockerySwinnertons Chelsea Blue
made in Staffordshire, England c.1950s

This set comprises 4 dinner plates, 4 side plates and 4 cake plates. The colour is described as ‘duck egg blue’.

I had been hunting for the matching Chelsea Blue coffee and tea sets, but upon reflecting how lovely the harlequin crockery sets are [see for example Swinnertons Nestor Vellum ‘Moonglo’ sets, below] I can’t actually imagine having a set all one colour.

Also, for some unexplained reason, the Chelsea Blue jug looks so wrong with the rest of the set- it is overblown, and has some quasi-20s affectations…what were they thinking? This is the 50s, people! I couldn’t bring myself to buy it – and left it on the shelf- which was probably a first for me.

This would be a good starter set for a harlequin table setting for 8 – just collect similar 50s colours in the same simple, rounded forms. Or just use as is – how good would cake look on those duck egg blue plates!

For sale: $AUD120

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Sellex canister set

Selex canister setSellex bakelite kitchen canister set
made in Australia c. 1940s

I have posted Sellex canisters previously – but this is an entire set, which is now rare to find. It’s a transfer label, white bakelite set consisting of Flour, Tea, Sugar, Rice and Sago. The Tea label has now been lost- probably due to over-use..but you notice the Sago label is still going strong….I’m just saying.

These canisters would look great in a monochrome white modernist kitchen.

This delicious creamy-white, hard-worn bakelite canister set is for sale; $AUD95

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70s Australiana

Crystal Craft trivet, made in Australia 1970s
Wiltshire ‘Vogue’ cutlery, made in Australia 1970s

Crystal Craft has become uber trendy for collectors: it is a resin-covered fabric that originated in Queensland in the 70s. This is a super 70s trivet- just look at the forms and colours! And it is great that the piece has it’s original sticker on the base.

The ‘Vogue’ cutlery was designed for Wiltshire by Stuart Devlin- famous for his other work designing the images on Australian coins [all native fauna & flora.] This was his day job – but once those coins were minted I think he gave up his day job! The cutlery are ‘new in box’ never opened or used, and in great condition.

I styled these two items together – I love the 70s colours! – but am happy to sell them separately: $AU35 each.

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Retro Ice buckets

Ice bucket collection

I collected these ice buckets because I loved the idea of using them with the bakelite blender [the ‘Vitamizer’, posted below] at cocktail parties. I am very partial to a martini, which while not strictly needing a blender, does require the service of an ice bucket. The blender was good for making frozen daiquiris, which my guests favoured. Either way – an ice bucket was totally necessary, and who wants to use a modern one?

I have ended up with a few ice buckets…and in researching these, I found quite a few avid collectors out there. People collect ice buckets. And why not- they look fantastic displayed together [and they’re good for storing ice…amongst other things…]

The bucket to the left in the image is made from Scandinavian teak, and has matching tongs.  The red plastic bucket has a brass handle, and has matching tongs. The only ice bucket with any branding – the Dia Ice Pail, made by Dia Vacuum bottle Industries Co. Ltd, is anodised aluminium and steel [with a ‘vacuum’ white plastic interior] and it comes with…you guessed it…matching tongs. Matching tongs are so important at a cocktail party.

For sale: $AUD75

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Egg cups by Poole

tea & eggs 50s style!Poole egg cup set,
made in England 1954

Poole is a very well-known pottery; it started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. All Poole is now highly collectible- but I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

This Poole egg cup set is in the twintone colourway [THEIR term] ‘Seagull and Teal’. The teal makes for a nice connection with the tea caddy. The ’seagull’ is a lovely mottled pinky-creamy-colour. The five piece set is in excellent condition; the plate under the egg cups has circular indentations to help steady the cups.

Bushells tea caddies, tin and mass produced to mark commemorative occasions, are now quite sought after. Here we have her Maj, Prince Philip and both countries’ flags to mark Elizabeth’s coronation in 1953. This caddy has now sold.

The Poole egg cup set is for sale: $AU75

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Kathie Winkle #70sstyle

Kathie Winkle ‘Kimberley’
made in England 1973

I am a huge Kathie Winkle fan: she produced over one hundred patterns for Broadhurst between 1958 and 1975. And it seems I’m not the only one: recently Kathie re-released several of the more popular patterns [see her website.]

However, these new releases are not handpainted, don’t have wonky registration of the transfer patterns, and look too – new and perfect. I much prefer the originals, and take great satisfaction from collecting them in the ‘wild’. So far, I have: Corinth [1967] Calypso [1963] Newlyn [1963] Tashkent, Kontiki [1965] Renaissance, Electra, Rushstone [1965] Michelle [1968] – and now- Kimberley [1973.]

This is a place setting for one: large plate, side plate and cup and saucer. And it’s for sale. Start your Kathie Winkle collection today! My ideal would be to have a place setting in six different patterns- fabulous! $AU45

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Myott #60sstyle

Myott ‘Camilla’ pottery
made in England, 1960s

Myott Pottery was established by two brothers, Ashley and Sydney Myott in 1898, in Staffordshire in England. The pottery continues today- although it has changed hands – and names- numerous times since.

Myott pottery is very collectable; especially art deco pieces from the turn of the century which now command hundreds of pounds. This work, ‘Camilla’ is ‘refined ironstone’ from the 60s. It’s starting to be collectable, due to the Myott name, and the general interest in 60s pottery [especially floral pottery.]

Camilla came in the two colourways shown: pink and yellow. The large oval platter in pink has a matching mug [not in image] and the boxed pin dishes [never used – ‘as new’] evidence the yellow colourway.

It’s not know where the name ‘Camilla’ came from: I thought [as did many collectors] that Camilla was a derivation of Camellia – which is one of the flowers of the motif. Maybe it’s just a woman’s name- maybe…it was named for the future Queen of England?

This collection is for sale: $AU55 [including coffee mug]