Airline travel bag

Orbitours travel bag, 1960sAirline travel bag
Made in Hong Kong, 1960s

Airline bags have become SO popular and collectable that there are now reproductions of classic Qantas bags- made in China, c. 2014- being sold for crazy prices on EBay. A REAL Qantas travel bag should cost in the order of $AU100 – but a repro? That should go for ten bucks [that’s 2 bucks for materials & assembly, 1 buck to ship it, and 7 dollars or 70% profit to the seller.] AND it should be clearly marked as a repro.

So- how to tell a fake? Well, take this Orbitour travel bag for example. It has its original sticker inside:

‘Nylon Coated Plastic
Made In Hong Kong”.

Sporting an original sticker, and made in Hong Kong [rather than China]; plus – it has some stitching missing on one handle and a little on the zip. Repros are startlingly perfect, looking like a facsimile of the original. You can’t fake age!

And the colour- that super cobalt blue with slightly wonky white font – it’s correct for the 60s.

I’ve teamed the Orbitours bag with an old 40s school case. It’s had some repair work- new rivets hold a new internal timber frame to the lid, but the locks and hinges and metal handle are all still original and working. It was made by the ‘American Bag Stores, Travelling Goods Specialists’, in Australia [as described on the internal label.] Talk about an original!

The Orbitours bag [Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane] is for sale: $AU55
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The old school case is for sale: $AU45
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‘Anthropomorphic Collectibles’

Apple s&p shakers, Japan 1960sApple salt & pepper shakers
made in Japan, 1960s

I have discovered that people love, really LOVE anthropomorphic figurines. Ebay even has a section “Anthropomorphic Collectibles”. These apples with startlingly large faces – reminiscent of early manga- have another thing going for them: they are functional salt and pepper shakers.

The shakers are part of a larger apple-faced set that includes a cookie jar [how collectable are cookie jars!] teapot, creamer and cup and saucers. Like many OTT things, I find that less is more- when you put the whole collection together the sum of the parts is less than the whole. You can have too much of a good thing. [And this coming from an avowed kitscher-lover!] My idea would be mix ‘n’ match with other faced ceramics – and make a sort of kitsch family.

The shakers are in great vintage condition, but have lost their original cork stoppers. All the shakers I have collected that used cork stoppers are in this state- it seems the cork only lasted a decade or two.

The apple shakers are for sale: $AU35

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Bambi planter [sold]

Bambi planter, 1960sBambi planter
made in Japan 1950s

A Bambi and her doe, in planter-style. I have filled the planter with bok choy [all I had to hand] but of course flowers and/or growing succulents would also work.

I have quite a few Bambis in my collection. I have purposely collected 1950 era bambis that were made here in Australia or in Japan – these are NOT Disney figurines, which I think look more ‘commercial’. I’ve already explained my nostalgic love for Bambi [short answer: not allowed to have one as a child] elsewhere on the blog; so suffice it to say – I collect Bambis whenever I can.

The Bambi planter is in great vintage condition and is for sale: $AU35. Buy now for Christmas!

Early Bunnykins [sold]

Bunnykins plate [1939]Early Bunnykins plate
made in England, 1939

Bunnykins  – made by Royal Doulton- are now highly collectable. I put it down to nostalgia.

Bunnykins plates, cups, and bowls – as endorsed by the Royal Family [Princess Margaret ate her cereal from a Bunnykins bowl- hence ROYAL Doulton] – was made from 1937 to 1953.

This plate has the earliest backstamp, and is impressed with ‘9.39’- which is a date stamp: September, 1939.

The plate has a mild yellow tint from age: but the transfer print of Mrs and Mr Bunny at table with their two children [one unfortunately ascribed as baby] – and the running rabbits around the plate are all intact. Add to this that the image has Barbara Vernon’s signature – this is a collectable piece.

The Bunnykins plate is for sale: $AU35

Bunnykins

Bunnykins egg cup [1940s]Royal Doulton ‘Bunnykins’ egg cup
made in England, c.1940s

Bunnykins is very collectible; I would say we are nearing peak Bunnykins collectability. Having grown-up with Bunnykins I would say that its collectability is completely due to nostalgia.

Produced by Royal Doulton – and on every child’s christening present list from the 60s-80s – there are literally millions of people who know Bunnykins from their porridge bowls, plates, cups and saucers and egg cups.

This egg cup has two bunnies playing horn and drums –as they are wont to do- and on the back is a bunny with red overalls, putting on a green overcoat and a green cap.

The egg cup is in excellent vintage condition – and is for sale: $AU10

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Autumn

Kathie Winkle 'Autumn' jug and bowlKathie Winkle, Broadhurst
‘Autumn’, made in England 1960s

I love Kathie Winkle designs and have collected to date: Taskent, Calypso, Kontiki, New Lyn- and now Autumn.

Kathie Winkle produced over a hundred designs…so I am just scratching the surface.

BUT- now that Kathie Winkle is re-issuing the most popular designs of the 60s – in this next century- with all that new technology affords…

…I find that I love these vintage pieces all the more lovely.

The ‘Autumn’ jug and sugar bowl are for sale: $AU35
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Crystal Craft [sold]

Crystal Craft Australian souvenirCrystal Craft wall plaque, made in Queensland, Australia 1960s

Crystal Craft! I have watched in astonishment as Crystal Craft has become incredibly collectible. Think the wired daisies with faces that proliferated in the 70s, or those resin daisy coasters with broad smiles in bright colours.

This example of Crystal Craft is where it all started: souvenirware using resin and marine opal. This is a wall plaque in the shape of Australia, with an ‘Australian Kangaroo’ insert where NSW would be. I take it that this would have sufficed as a souvenir from any city or town in NSW.  On the back the label suggests this is a “decorative wall plaque for children, created with glass like resin and marine opals…”

Marine Opals – aka polished abalone shell, aka Paua shell for New Zealand readers- would seem to be a rather optimistic euphemism. Still this was the 60s, and marketing is what is it [and always has been.]

I have teamed the Crystal Craft plaque with wire plate hangers from roughly the same period: I have featured so many plates recently with suggestions to hang them on the wall that I thought it only right to include some original plate hangers.

The Crystal Craft plaque is for sale: $AUD10 + postage. I have featured a Crystal Craft owl letter holder and a teapot trivet previously : start your Crystal Craft collection today!

McCredie vases [sold]

McCredie vasesMcCredie ‘flower’ vases
made in Sydney, Australia 1930s-40s

Nell McCredie was an architect before she opened her pottery studio in Epping, Sydney in 1932 to make fine art pottery by hand. McCredie continued to produce pottery right up to her death in 1968, and she was interested in art and design in all her work – as she said:

“Pottery-making is definitely an art inasmuch as the design is a purely individual thing. The technique of moulding is mechanical but the conception and execution of a design is an art -a fascinating art.” [Where Pottery is made by Hand, SMH, Oct 20 1936.]

McCredie pottery made vases and domestic ware – often a distinctive matt outer glaze as seen in this image -and a contrasting coloured shiny interior glaze. The forms were simple and strong, quite different to a lot of 30s and 40s pottery- employing what might be termed ‘architectural’ or structural forms.

This selection of small ‘flower’ shaped vases evidences the variety of colours that can be found on McCredie vases. As with all her pottery, the vase is hand signed on the base: McCredie N.S.W.

The McCredie ‘flower’ vases are for sale: $AUD150

Arabia ‘Ruska’ [sold]

Arabia Ruska, 1970sArabia ‘Ruska’ crockery
made in Finland, 1970s

Arabia is uber collectable right now. Here we have a Arabia Ruska [Ruska = ‘autumn colours’] eight piece crockery set comprising large and side plates, and cup & saucers.

In the 70s every design studio was rebelling against the pastel/chrome/psychedelic colours of the 50s and 60s. The 70s was all about form, integrity, simplicity, and honesty. And brown. Brown featured a lot. Brown was both the colour of most base materials [think clay, timber, brick] and the basic tertiary colour that didn’t draw attention to itself. It was all about form – not colour.

Arabia Ruska is a collection of kitchenalia that celebrates autumnal colours- no two handpainted pieces are the exact same brown. It was made pre-dishwashers, so it has to be hand washed or the Arabia backstamp is liable to be erased.

Featured in an earlier post is a matching Arabia Ruska casserole dish: if you require this can also be purchased. The eight piece setting comprising thirty-two pieces is for sale: $AUD200

78ers- Ernie & Bert

Ernie & Bert squeaky toys, 1978Ernie & Bert squeaky toys
made in US 1978

Two squeaky toys from the 70s – both marked © Muppets Inc 1978. Ebay has a whole section devoted to Collectible Sesame Street items; and these toys go for a fabulous price.

While Sesame Street- the TV show- debuted in 1969, Jim Henson, and his wife Jane Henson started Muppets Inc in 1958. Muppets Inc is now owned and operated by their children- and Sesame Street character toys are still being made.

The two toys are in great condition for being thirty-eight years old. Ernie and Bert are seminal figures from most peoples’ childhoods- and this continues today.

Ernie and Bert are for sale: $AUD45

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