Rustic 60s Dutch scene

Dutch scene, ceramic wall hanging
made in Japan 1960s

Here is a fabulous 3D ceramic wall hanging: a lovely Dutch scene, made, you know in Japan in the 60s. A bit of cross-cultural referencing.

It’s ready to hang- with hole and wire on the back…but can stand on its own two feet too. Very cleverly, those weird crossed logs on the base are legs!

The whole thing is 180 x 130mm, by 30mm deep. Hang or stand – the choice it up to you!

The Dutch scene is for sale: $AU35

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Fowler Ware jug [sold]

Fowler Ware jug,
made in Australia 1930s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWI, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their graduated pudding bowls & jugs were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This is a blue and white striped jug from the 30s; the blue and white colours resembled English Cornish Ware and were the premium pieces produced in the 20s and 30s. Every day pieces- ‘Cream Ware’ were made under the Fowler’ Utility’ label, while the blue and white pieces- coffee pots, pudding bowls and jugs- have a Fowler Ware & Sons backstamp.

This jug appears never to have been used: it is pristine inside and out. Quite a rare find.

The Fowler Ware jug is for sale: $AU75

Retro novelty plates

Retro novelty platesRetro novelty plates
made in England [?] c. 1960s

Corny or what?

CONGRATULATIONS i’m so HOPPY for you!
drop me a Lion will you?
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to you…happy birthday…[this sung by a crow-postman]
DON’T CROAK get well QUICK

Well, OK, that last one is a little suspect. Not so much corny as bordering on tactless.

Following on from a recent post featuring comic lawn bowlers [see below] – another subject ripe for hilarity, these novelty plates appeal to me in the same manner. The screwball graphics and expressions – sort of sums up the swinging 60s! I can’t image them being made today.

The plates are unmarked, but I think they are English in origin- the person from whom I purchased them believed so. If anybody knows anything more about these novelty plates, I’d love to hear from you.

For sale: $AUD60

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50s Diana vases

Diana vases,
made in Australia 1950s

As you know, I collect Australian pottery made by Diana- the post-war pottery was situated very near where I now live in Sydney. I collect the ‘Australiana’ pottery in colours of eucalypt green and bark brown- but the same vase shape came in a multitude of colours to suit the changing interiors of post-war Australia.

Here are two posy vases- or ring vases- which display floating flowers [rather than stemmed flowers] and a small matching vase. The deep crimson and powder blue colours are SO 50s; but the geometric patterning on these vases harks back to the 20s and Art Deco. The same shaped vases were made well into the 70s, when they were handpainted [quite garishly, natch] with Australian flora.

Diana produced ‘art pottery’ from 1940 to 1975. The pottery is unique in that it only produced art and domestic pottery products, rather than having antecedents in industrial pottery. I have a number [she said, modestly] of Diana pieces featured on this blog; jugs, pudding bowls, ramekins, casserole dishes, platters, coffee pots…and vases.

This collection of vases is for sale: $AU75 [the small vase has original Diana sticker]

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Egg cups by Poole

tea & eggs 50s style!Poole egg cup set,
made in England 1954

Poole is a very well-known pottery; it started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. All Poole is now highly collectible- but I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

This Poole egg cup set is in the twintone colourway [THEIR term] ‘Seagull and Teal’. The teal makes for a nice connection with the tea caddy. The ’seagull’ is a lovely mottled pinky-creamy-colour. The five piece set is in excellent condition; the plate under the egg cups has circular indentations to help steady the cups.

Bushells tea caddies, tin and mass produced to mark commemorative occasions, are now quite sought after. Here we have her Maj, Prince Philip and both countries’ flags to mark Elizabeth’s coronation in 1953. This caddy has now sold.

The Poole egg cup set is for sale: $AU75

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Kathie Winkle #70sstyle

Kathie Winkle ‘Kimberley’
made in England 1973

I am a huge Kathie Winkle fan: she produced over one hundred patterns for Broadhurst between 1958 and 1975. And it seems I’m not the only one: recently Kathie re-released several of the more popular patterns [see her website.]

However, these new releases are not handpainted, don’t have wonky registration of the transfer patterns, and look too – new and perfect. I much prefer the originals, and take great satisfaction from collecting them in the ‘wild’. So far, I have: Corinth [1967] Calypso [1963] Newlyn [1963] Tashkent, Kontiki [1965] Renaissance, Electra, Rushstone [1965] Michelle [1968] – and now- Kimberley [1973.]

This is a place setting for one: large plate, side plate and cup and saucer. And it’s for sale. Start your Kathie Winkle collection today! My ideal would be to have a place setting in six different patterns- fabulous! $AU45

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Donald Clark placemats

'Cigarette' ashtray & Daniel Clark placeats‘Fish’ placemats by Donald Clark,
made in Australia 1960s

The Australian artist – cum graphic designer- Donald Clark is having a resurgence right now. The pattern on these linen placemats is [unsurprisingly] ‘Fish’ and the limes and greys and very funky 60s-ness reminded me of this 60s ashtray. There are four placemats in the set, all with Donald’s signature.

Yes- that’s an ironic 60s ashtray that features cigarettes on a painters easel. Surrounded by abstract art forms, in a funky 60s shape, that’s an astray that I can enjoy. [Plus it’s never been used and would make a great pin dish.]

As an ode to the funky 60s, this set is for sale: $60

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30s Mickey Mouse

1930s Mickey Mouse napkin ringMickey Mouse napkin ring
made in Japan 1930s

How fabulous is this hand-painted Mickey Mouse napkin ring? Here he is in his early Disney rendering- all rat-like but with his trademark big ears. Mickey first appeared in 1928 [in Steamboat Willie] and this napkin ring was made not soon after.

I found Mickey in a collector’s sale lot of napkin rings and bought the lot because Mickey was there. Mickey is in great condition with only a little wear to the hand-painting on his extremities- ears and nose. He is very collectible- as is any vintage Mickey Mouse item. Mickey’s from the 30s and 40s are now highly sought after.

Mickey is shown here with a bakelite spice canister and a sweet tin from the 30s…they were made in Australia but since Mickey is a universal icon, I don’t think that matters. Mickey is for sale: $AUD75

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Fat Lava

Scheurich pottery,
made in West Germany 1960-70s

I have come to embrace the ‘fat lava’ craze for West Germany pottery only recently. One thing that helped was seeing the pottery in its homeland when I visited Berlin- and another thing that has helped has been time; I grew up with this stuff and hated it as a youngster!

‘Fat lava’ refers to the glaze type which is typically chunky and classically 70s in form and colour. The pieces shown here are from our personal collection – we decided to collect in orange and red. There are a million varieties of these shapes in every conceivable colour variation…but due to popularity and [crazy collectors] they are becoming harder to find.

One of my favourite collectors is someone who has collected the one Scheurich shape and form – [it happens to be the middle of the red pieces shown here] and has over 70 varieties of it. They look fantastic displayed together – this is a case where more- IS more!

Myott #60sstyle

Myott ‘Camilla’ pottery
made in England, 1960s

Myott Pottery was established by two brothers, Ashley and Sydney Myott in 1898, in Staffordshire in England. The pottery continues today- although it has changed hands – and names- numerous times since.

Myott pottery is very collectable; especially art deco pieces from the turn of the century which now command hundreds of pounds. This work, ‘Camilla’ is ‘refined ironstone’ from the 60s. It’s starting to be collectable, due to the Myott name, and the general interest in 60s pottery [especially floral pottery.]

Camilla came in the two colourways shown: pink and yellow. The large oval platter in pink has a matching mug [not in image] and the boxed pin dishes [never used – ‘as new’] evidence the yellow colourway.

It’s not know where the name ‘Camilla’ came from: I thought [as did many collectors] that Camilla was a derivation of Camellia – which is one of the flowers of the motif. Maybe it’s just a woman’s name- maybe…it was named for the future Queen of England?

This collection is for sale: $AU55 [including coffee mug]