Pudding bowls

Fowler Ware pudding bowls,
made in Australia 1940s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This image shows the range of colours and sizes the pudding bowls were made in – and other posts evidence the rest! [I have collected a number of Fowler Ware pudding bowls….] The bowls and are still fit for purpose : I received a lovely christmas pudding made in one of these bowls- and after eating the pudding – I got to keep the bowl!

The large crimson and medium grey bowl are for sale : $AUD25 & $AU15 [or $30 for the pair.]

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10″ slide rules

10” slide rules
Hemmi, made in Japan, c.1954
Aristo, made in Japan, c. 1960
Royal, made in Japan, c.1960

The first slide rulers were developed in the C17th, for mathematical calculations. They were used consistently from this date until 1974, when they were replaced by the scientific calculator. The middle section moves between scales on top and bottom of the scales, and then an independent clear plastic slider is moved to allow the calculation to be read.

These 10” slide rulers [250mm] were made for the office; they are larger and allow more complex calculations that the smaller 5” portable scale rules […yes..they will appear in a previous post…I can’t help it…I love them!]

The Hemmi slide [topmost in the image] has a bamboo structure, with a plastic laminate covering; whilst the later slide rules are all solid plastic. All slide rules come in their own boxes [some with original operating instructions] and some have their original owners names incised on the box.

For sale: $AUD85

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Carlton Ware ‘contemporary ware’

Carlton Ware leaf dishes and salt & pepper shakersCarlton Ware ‘Contemporary Ware’ dishes and salt and pepper shakers, made in England 1951-1961

Many people are familiar with the botanically-themed Carlton Ware ceramics [and having a background in horticulture, I am quite ‘familiar’ with them myself.]  Various daisy/foxglove/wild rose motifs were made in the 30s, 40s and continuing into the 50s, but in 1951 a modernist theme emerged.  These leaf-shaped dishes and cubic salt and pepper shakers are an example of this and were dubbed ‘contemporary’ ware.

The four monochrome dishes have a wonderful abstract leaf shape, and so appeal to me. I also like the austerity and the somewhat obtuse cube-shaped shakers. These pieces are now quite hard to come by, and are all in perfect condition.

For sale: $AUD150

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Split cane hat rack

Split cane hat rack, 1940sSplit cane hat rack
made in Australia 1940s

This is a superb example of split cane – a hat rack employing a complex interlacing of cane members with six hooks for six hats. The rack was made in the 40s so there is a bit of wear to the once shiny cane; I like the patina it has developed but you might want to re-varnish it; totally up to you.

Split cane became very fashionable in the 40s in Australia and furniture from the small – magazine rack- to the large- entire sofa suites was made from it. Australian cane has quite a distinctive dark spotty appearance which makes it very attractive; other cane tends to be more monochrome.

One of the hat hooks has sagged a little- giving the rack an asymmetrical appearance which I think is kinda nice. The cane is in excellent condition and the hook could be steamed and re-formed to its original shape if desired. The hat rack is ready to hang.

The hack rack is for sale: $AUD125

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60s jigsaws

60s jigsaws
made in Australia

Two delightful jigsaws, made from timber, in Australia in the 60s. The first was made by Louise Rayner Toys; the second – a teaching clock, is unmarked. Both jigsaws came from a nursery school, who purchased them in the 60s but now deemed them too ‘old-fashioned’ for today’s children. So – hello – retro!

I do remember playing with a clock jigsaw when I was at nursery school- the plastic handles are adjustable and have to be moved in order to get all the pieces in. And I just love the funky glasses on the coloured jigsaw- which is very ‘analogue’ with a clock and a rotary telephone!

Both jigsaws are in excellent vintage condition; with very little wear and are for sale: $AU45

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Blue Moon

Poole Blue Moon tea cups,
made in England 1960-1975

Poole is a very well known pottery, which started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

These tea cups – very modern in shape and sans handle – are part of the Cameo range. The colour is ‘Blue Moon’ –a deep blue exterior, with a slightly off-white interior [pure white would be too stark…this off-white is just right.] The set of eight tea cups and saucers have the traditional mid-century Poole mark on each piece.

The cups don’t hold much tea – not that I have used them as such – the lovely colour and repetition of form has had them serve a purely decorative function. But they would make for a lovely tea party.

For sale: $AUD145
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Red bakelite s&p

Bakelite salt and pepper shakers
made by Marquis, Nally, Eon in Australia, c.1940s

I have previously posted bakelite salt and pepper shakers – twice- first in a grouping of green examples and then in a grouping of multi-coloured examples. Here we have a collection of red s&p. They were made to be included in the picnic basket- an everyday object made in a newly-developed plastic- that wouldn’t break in the great outdoors.

I am very fond of the ingenious design of the first two shakers – the top and bottom separate to reveal the two shakers; and you can see that the screw-on bases were often different coloured bakelite. These shakers were made by Marquis; and are impressed with ‘cat 729’.

The next pair of shakers were made by Nally: they are quite distinctive with black bakelite screw lids; and the last set of shakers- although not marked, are by Eon.

For bakelite collectors, and salt and pepper shaker collectors- you know who you are!

For sale: $AUD115

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50s Australian glassware

Australian glassware, 1950sAustralian glassware
made in 1950s

I am a huge fan of Australian glassware: and collect it when I can.

Here we have:
tri-pouring graduated ½ pint jug [pours from three sides]
Kodak developing chemical graduated glass
and seven medicine graduated glasses.

All pieces were made rough-and-ready; several have ‘bubbles’ in the glass, and evident seam lines. But no chips or cracks- all these lovely glasses can be used today for their original – or indeed – new purposes.

Because that’s what glass is like. Unlike plastic, it does not allow molecular transfer – so when heated or filled with foodstuffs or chemicals- there is no movement between the two.

And being made in the 50s- all the graduated measurements are imperial; in relief in the glass, or transfer printed. A lovely snap-shot of Australian glassware.

This set of Australian glassware is for sale: $AU95

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Royal visit glasses

Royal visit glasses [Australia, 1954]Royal visit glasses
made in Australia, 1954

Not difficult to gauge the age of these glasses: they are printed on them. Her Majesty visited the colonies in 1954 – a year after her coronation in 1953.

Australia is still a part of the Commonwealth, with her Maj as our Queen. We had a referendum to become a republic in 1999 – it was defeated – and the debate still rages.

So- all this is to say- there are a lot – A LOT- of monarchists in our midst. Monarchists who collect ER memorabilia. Here we have two shot glasses, and a pair of drinking glasses. The drinking glasses have had more wear [more toasts!] and some of the gilt is worn. The shot glasses, meanwhile, look pristine.

Just saying; monarchists prefer to toast her Maj with beer, rather than vodka. It’s empirical!

The Royal Visit glasses are for sale: $AU55

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Wiltshire ‘Burgundy’ coffee & tea set

Wilshire 'Burgundy' coffee & tea set [Australia, 1972]Wiltshire ‘Burgundy’ tea & coffee set
made in Australia 1972

This great retro set of coffee pot, teapot, creamer and serving tray has a funky shape, satin finish to the 18/8 stainless steel and a fantastic embossed pattern. It was produced in 1972, and the Burgundy pattern extended to serving ware too: sugar bowl, sauce boat, salad bowl & servers, salt and pepper shakers and cutlery.

I have collected the matching cutlery too. I am a sucker for good Australian design! [For evidence, see blog posts below.]

In researching the history of the Wiltshire ‘Burgundy’ I came across an original advertisement for it in the Sydney Morning Herald– this was the must have service of the 70s. Anecdotally, everyone I speak to remembers this set being in their beach shack- it has a ‘holiday house’ vibe.

BUT- the best part of this collecting story: this tea & coffee set came from an order of Nuns who donated it to the second-hand shop I bought it from: apparently they hadn’t used it since it was given them in the 70s and had decided- forty years later- to clear their cupboards. I love the idea of Nuns being given funky 70s stainless steel and deciding instead to go with their English china.

The Burgundy tea and coffee set is for sale: $AU105
The Burgundy cutlery is also in superb condition- it doesn’t look like it’s been used; and it’s for sale: $AUD75 [place setting for 6; 18 pieces.]

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