50s Japanese ramekins

Ramekins
made in Japan, 1950s

I’m not sure when ramekins became vintagey fashionable, but these are good examples from the 50s. With 50s styling and colours they were all collected singly to make a set of five [a typical Japanese set.]

Ramekins are great for small dishes, soups and for foods cooked directly in them [chocolate pudding comes to mind!]

Since this image was taken, I have added to the collection- ramekins with a powder pink and a pastel blue interior. Let me know your preferred mix!

The ramekins are for sale: $AU45 [set of 5]

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Elischer pottery

Elischer ramekins & vaseElischer ramekins & vase
made in Melbourne, Australia 1950s

Most of my collection comes from Sydney potteries – but Elischer is a Melbourne pottery which commenced in the late 30s and continued until the late 80s. Elischer was a Viennese sculptor who turned to pottery when he immigrated to Melbourne. These pieces; three ramekins and a small vase, are in the typical 50s colourway of black, tan and cream but employ atypical organic, asymmetrical forms.

I have one other Elischer pottery piece in the collection – very different to these pieces- a Four Seasons Whiskey jug. By the 60s Elischer was making commercial bar ware and had moved away from the more experimental pottery seen here.

None of these pieces is signed – I have deduced from research and the matching colourway/asymmetric forms that all these pieces are Elischer. They are for sale: $AUD80

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Elischer pottery

Elischer ramekins & vaseElischer ramekins & vase
made in Melbourne, Australia 1950s

Most of my collection comes from Sydney potteries – but Elischer is a Melbourne pottery which commenced in the late 30s and continued until the late 80s. Elischer was a Viennese sculptor who turned to pottery when he immigrated to Melbourne. These pieces; three ramekins and a small vase, are in the typical 50s colourway of black, tan and cream but employ atypical organic, asymmetrical forms.

I have one other Elischer pottery piece in the collection – very different to these pieces- a Four Seasons Whiskey jug. By the 60s Elischer was making commercial bar ware and had moved away from the more experimental pottery seen here.

None of these pieces is signed – I have deduced from research and the matching colourway/asymmetric forms that all these pieces are Elischer. They are for sale: $AUD80

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Martin Boyd ramekins

Martin Boyd ramekins & saucersMartin Boyd ramekins made in Australia 1957 I have posted a set of Boyd ramekins previously, so look away now if you’ve read this before! The Boyds are a famous Australian family of artists. Martin Boyd pottery started in Cremorne, Sydney in 1946- but Martin doesn’t exist, instead it was Guy [Martin] Boyd who was the chief ceramicist. The pottery was in operation from 1946-1964, with 1957-58 being the peak production period. All Martin Boyd pottery is made [and signed by hand] so there is a slight variation between any pieces in a set. The pottery is instantly recognisable from the edge band of clear glaze that always separates the two toned pieces. The colours are quintessentially 50s. This set of six ramekins have matching saucers – which can be mixed and matched to suit your mood. For sale: $AUD285 Buy Now

Retro 60s ramekin set

Retro 60s ramekin setRetro 60s ramekin set
made in Japan, c. 1960s

I have made many inquires of this set: but cannot establish the maker. I know they are Japanese, made in the mid 60s [the harlequin colours alone tell you that] but they are unmarked and all my reliable sources of retro inquiry have proved fallible.

There is a fantastic blog devoted to the collection of ramekins [Rameking- http://rameking.blogspot.com.au] -you have to love such a dedicated pursuit. But alas, they don’t know who made these lovelies either. It remains a mystery.

All the ramekins are in perfect condition- and ready for your own ramekin collection obsession! This set is for sale: $AUD55

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Diana ramekins & condiment bowls

Diana ramekins & condiment bowls
made in Australia c. 1950s

I have posted before about Diana, a Marrickville [Sydney] pottery that produced from 1940 to 1975. I live very close to Marrickville, so became fascinated with this pottery and um…collected…a…bit…of it….. ..  .. . .

These fantastic 50s ramekins are all in good condition – with the exception of the bottom square blue ramekin, which has two tiny nicks in its rim [zoom in on image, you’ll see them.] I love the way the ramekins, when stacked like this, resemble Daleks [the official nomenclature is ‘scroll ware’, but I can’t help thinking Dalek ware.]

The ramekins, that quintessential 50s soup accoutrement, came in either a square or round shape with scroll handle. Diana made sure that all the 50s colours were represented, and like the Martine Boyd ramekins [also below] started the trend towards multi-coloured dinnerware that could be bought piece by piece- rather than a patterned, unified set. Together with the condiment bowls, these ramekins would kick-start any Diana 50s collection.      For sale: $AUD275

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Martin Boyd ramekins

Martin Boyd ramekins
made in Australia 1957

The Boyds are a famous Australian family of artists. Martin Boyd pottery started in Cremorne, Sydney in 1946- but Martin doesn’t exist, instead it was Guy [Martin] Boyd who was the chief ceramicist. The pottery was in operation from 1946-1964, with 1957-58 being the peak production period.

All Martin Boyd pottery is made [and signed] by hand so there is a slight variation between any piece in a set. The pottery is instantly recognisable from the edge band of unglazed pottery that always separates the two toned pieces. The colours are quintessentially 50s.

This set of eight ramekins is in excellent condition – it has never been used. The person I bought the set from told me they were her mother’s who bought them new in 1957. She decided they were too lovely to ever be used for such a prosaic purpose as soup- and put them on display.   For sale: $AUD255

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