20s toast rack

Manto Ware toast racksManto Ware toast racks
made in Japan 1920s

At the turn of the century, Manto Ware pottery started producing work that mimicked Royal Winton; here we have an example- very English looking toast racks, textured ceramic for a ‘naturalistic’ look and topped by an acorn. These were made for the export market- for Australia and New Zealand- markets that wanted Royal Winton but couldn’t afford the price- or the time- for the products to arrive. Manto Ware stepped in to fill the breach.

It’s rare to find a pair of anything vintage these days- and indeed- I collected these two toast racks separately. But they make a fine pair, and –as attested by Etsy and Pinterest- toast racks are very collectible and are eminently repurposeable. I use mine as a vintage letter/business card holder. [Or, you know, you can use them for toast.]

Silver plate toast racks are good too- see my recent post of a 1920s EPSN toast rack.

The toast racks are for sale: $AUD45

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60s articulated circus

Fisher Price articulated circus
made in US 1963

Fisher Price is uber collectable right now- I put it down to baby boomer nostalgia. No-one I knew growing up could afford imported Fisher Price toys for their children…so now vintage Fisher Price is being purchased by adults [for themselves! – not even for their vintage children/grandchildren!]

This is an articulated circus: the pieces are all timber, with anthropomorphised dress – the ringmaster bear has gingham pants, blazer, vest and a bowtie! There are 15 pieces in the set, but only ten here photographed- the set is complete with four circus top pieces and a bear riding in a car.  They are all in excellent condition, with the minor exception of the bear and the seal, who show signs of ‘pre-love’.

The articulated circus is for sale: $AU55

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SylvaC lamb

SlyvaC lamb
made in England, 1940s

I have collected a few SylvaC figurines and plates, jugs & mugs over the years. This lovely lamb [#1659] complements the fawn-coloured terrier figurine posted just recently. I also have a SylvaC ‘Scaredy Cat’ figurine. Like many SylvaC figurines, the lamb came in the limited colourway of fawn, green and cream. [OK- i agree – it’s beige. It’s SylvaC’s description, not mine.]

SylvaC  is highly collectible, and according to www.sylvac.priceguide.s5.com figurines are commanding quite high prices.

I bought all my figurines for styling purposes, so decided to pose the lamb with a styling item of its own: this toy tug boat, which is roughly the same vintage as the figurine, and with a complementary colouring. I posted it on Instagram, and of course- sod’s law- the toy tug boat was immediately bought!

So – the SylvaC lamb is for sale: $AU25

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60s platter

Westminster ‘Sierra’ platter
made in Australia, 1962

Despite both exotic names [Westminster, evoking England] and Sierra [evoking America] this platter with it’s gay 60s abstract flowers was made in Australia.

Westminster started making souvenirware under the name Stanley Rogers & Sons in Melbourne in 1954. They imported blank ceramic pieces from Japan which they then decorated locally. By the 60s the name was changed to Westminster Fine China – to suggest a longer and more illustrious history – and a much larger range of tea sets and dinner sets where produced.  These were decorated with bright, abstract flower arrangements [sometimes in very 60s and 70s gaudy colours.] On the whole, this platter in the ‘Sierra’ pattern is quite restrained.

The platter is in good vintage condition, and is for sale: $25

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Collectable Hornsea

Hornsea Saffron breakfast set
made in England, 1970s

Here we have a lovely breakfast set: egg cup and salt & pepper shakers- with teak lids- in a teak tray.

Hornsea is famous for its 70s patterns; always two apposite colours in a geometric pattern. I’ve showcased them all: Saffron, Heirloom and Bronte.

I grew up with this 70s oppositional style: and have only now come to embrace it again. Especially now it’s so collectable! I have styled the egg cup with wattle: it kinda recalls the yolk and i like how even a humble egg cup can become a vase.

The breakfast set is in great vintage condition, and is for sale: $AU35

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Calypso!

Broadhurst by Kathie Winkle ‘Calypso’ platter
made in England 1963

I am a huge Kathie Winkle fan: she produced over one hundred patterns for Broadhurst between 1958 and 1975. And it seems I’m not the only one: recently Kathie re-released several of the more popular patterns [see her website.]

However, these new releases are not handpainted, don’t have wonky registration of the transfer patterns, and look too – new and perfect. I much prefer the originals, and take great satisfaction from collecting them in the ‘wild’. So far, I have: Corinth [1967] Calypso [1963] Newlyn [1963] Tashkent, Kontiki [1965] Renaissance, Electra, Rushstone [1965] Michelle [1968] – and – Kimberley [1973.]

This is a fabulously large platter, ‘Calypso’. It was the pattern that my partner grew up with, in the 60s. I think she is starting to embrace it again- meanwhile- I think I love it anew.

And it’s for sale. Start your Kathie Winkle collection today! My ideal would be to have a place setting in six different patterns- fabulous! $AU35

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Mary, Mary QUITE contrary

Royal Art Pottery Mistress Mary cup
made in England, 1940s

A delightful children’s cup, featuring ‘Mistress Mary’ of the nursery rhyme:
Mary, Mary, quite contrary
How does your garden grow?
With silverbells and cockleshells
And pretty maids all in a row.

Here Mistress Mary [a la 1940s- as evidenced by her haircut] is seen with a rake and watering can, near the Silverbells. The cup has the royal crown logo and “Royal Art Pottery, England” on the base.

Perhaps you know a contrary Mary? This is the cup for them!

The cup is in great vintage condition & is for sale; $AU20

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Vintage soda siphons

Vintage Australian soda siphonsSchweppes soda siphons,
made in Sydney, c.1948-1950

These lovely soda bottles are very collectible and all have etched & faceted glass– such a deal of detail just for soda water! Because the soda bottles are so highly prized they have been well researched and described – there is a wealth of information about them – which allows them to be accurately dated.

The glass bottles don’t photograph too well on my timber background, but if you click on the image and zoom in you can see the intricate glass etchings to the bottles.

All three bottles are etched: ‘Schweppes, [Australia] Ltd, 30 Fl Oz Soda Water’ and were one of the first soda bottles to have a plastic and metal top. I’ve seen all sorts of upcycling with siphon bottles, but for my money, I think they look great massed together on a bar, or near a window where light picks up the fantastic etching.

This collection is for sale: $AUD125

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Smiths Ringers

Smiths RingersRetro kitchen timers
Smiths Ringers, made in England, 1940s,1950s, 1960s

Perhaps I should have styled these three ‘ringers’ chronologically- as it is, the green ringer is bakelite and steel, with a glass cover- circa 1940, the middle ringer is the youngest- a mere slip of a thing from the 60s – brown coated metal, and the last, red ringer is all plastic- from the 1950s.

Each ringer is somewhat redolent of its age. I do like the fact that the 60s ringer is called ‘Ringer Girl’- if only the other two had similarly inspired names. All the ringers have different bell sounds- naturally- and due to their age and hard working life, are more suited as objects of beauty, rather than function. The green bakelite is a little faded, the brown metal is a little rusted in parts- as you’d expect from vintage items.

The ‘lemon’ tray lends a stylistic note to the image- but if you’d like to have it along with the ringers- let me know. This set is for sale: $AUD95

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Cookie jar

Cookie Shoppe cookie jar
made in Japan, 1960s

Here for your delectation is a cookie jar. Cookie jars are so collectable! This one is fashioned as an olde worlde cookie shoppe – look at the Tudor detailing and shingle roof!

The cookie jar was made in Japan in the 60s, and the lid and handle are all intact. It’s hand-painted, and stamped Japan on the base. All-in-all, a good cookie jar thing.

I haven’t collected any other cookie jars – this is a first for me. It’s kitsch – Japanese – and I love how it advertises its own use. It’s for cookies!

The cookie jar is for sale: $AU55