Collectable Hornsea

Hornsea Saffron breakfast set
made in England, 1970s

Here we have a lovely breakfast set: egg cup and salt & pepper shakers- with teak lids- in a teak tray.

Hornsea is famous for its 70s patterns; always two apposite colours in a geometric pattern. I’ve showcased them all: Saffron, Heirloom and Bronte.

I grew up with this 70s oppositional style: and have only now come to embrace it again. Especially now it’s so collectable! I have styled the egg cup with wattle: it kinda recalls the yolk and i like how even a humble egg cup can become a vase.

The breakfast set is in great vintage condition, and is for sale: $AU35

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Mary, Mary QUITE contrary

Royal Art Pottery Mistress Mary cup
made in England, 1940s

A delightful children’s cup, featuring ‘Mistress Mary’ of the nursery rhyme:
Mary, Mary, quite contrary
How does your garden grow?
With silverbells and cockleshells
And pretty maids all in a row.

Here Mistress Mary [a la 1940s- as evidenced by her haircut] is seen with a rake and watering can, near the Silverbells. The cup has the royal crown logo and “Royal Art Pottery, England” on the base.

Perhaps you know a contrary Mary? This is the cup for them!

The cup is in great vintage condition & is for sale; $AU20

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Cookie jar

Cookie Shoppe cookie jar
made in Japan, 1960s

Here for your delectation is a cookie jar. Cookie jars are so collectable! This one is fashioned as an olde worlde cookie shoppe – look at the Tudor detailing and shingle roof!

The cookie jar was made in Japan in the 60s, and the lid and handle are all intact. It’s hand-painted, and stamped Japan on the base. All-in-all, a good cookie jar thing.

I haven’t collected any other cookie jars – this is a first for me. It’s kitsch – Japanese – and I love how it advertises its own use. It’s for cookies!

The cookie jar is for sale: $AU55

Personal collection

Diana vase
made in Australia 1940s

This is part of my personal collection: you will recall that I like Diana pottery [originally made right near where I now live] – in the colours of green/brown [Australiana- nationalistic colours discovered in the 40s and 50s.] These nationalistic colours- reminiscent of the Australian bush – are dear to me as a landscape architect.

So- while I have many other Diana pottery on the blog for sale, I continue to collect this green/brown Diana from the late war period.  Diana was starting to embrace & recognise colours that made Australia unique.

Then the 70s happened. I don’t collect Diana ware from the 70s- with the exception of the brutalist ‘Safari’ set [see blog below.] The rest of the 70s collection- when the pottery finally closed- is made up of either bland brown or gaudily covered flora. That was the crazy 70s- either abstract nothingness or super-charged vibrancy.

Fun Ho!

Fun Ho! road roller
made in New Zealand 1972

What a great name for a toy: Fun Ho! These diecast models [called “midget scale”] were made in New Zealand to take on Dinky and Matchbox diecast toys.

This road roller is #37, and is in great vintage condition [note that it hasn’t been repainted – a fate suffered by a lot of diecast toys.] On Ebay, these models, sans box, sell for around $30.

Diecast toys are very collectable – particularly industrial vehicles and caravans; so this road roller is pretty cool. I like the bright orange colour, so- naturally- I teamed it with an actual orange [for scale purposes, you understand.]

The road roller is for sale: $AU20
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Fowler Ware nested pudding bowls

Fowler Ware pudding bowls
made in Australia 1940s

It is rare- very rare- to find a complete set of nested pudding bowls. Look at those fabulous 40s colours! And all in very good condition, too- ready to make puddings!

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

Fowler Ware also sold pudding bowls under the ‘Utility’ brand: these were white or cream, and while also made of stoneware, somewhat thicker and more ‘utilitarian’ than these harlequin pudding bowls. I have – as you can imagine- collected these as well!

The nested pudding bowls are in great vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU150

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Electronic calculator

Sharp electronic calculator,
made in Japan 1977

An electronic calculator, I hear you say! Ten digit with VFD? Yes- VFD [vacuum fluorescent display.] [Ok, I had to look it up.] But ten digits! In bright green fluro display.

This is the Compet, CS-1109A electronic calculator, made in 1977. With absolutely fantastic 70s styling – including the key fonts and colours. I love everything about this calculator!

Check out www.vintagecalculators.com and read about their take on the ol’ CS-1109A. And also Ebay has a vintage calculator category. Vintage calculators!

The vintage electronic calculator is in great condition, and could be yours for $AU85

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Penny Inkwells

Penny inkwells,
made in Victoria, Australia 1880-1910

This is a collection of ‘penny’ inkwells; there are ceramic and so-called because they were cheaply made bottles that cost a penny to buy. They were crudely made and one of the first ‘disposables’- they were simply thrown out when they were empty. So this little collection is quite rare: most penny inkwells that survived the nineteenth century are chipped or broken.

The ceramic is stoneware with a salt glaze. Each inkwell is a different colour, depending on the mix of the original clay colour and the finished glaze: they range from a light tan to a deep russet brown. No two the same!

Most penny inkwells were used by school children; but would occasionally also be bought to be used in homes. There are many websites devoted to the collection of inkwells, and Ebay has a section for ‘collectable inkwells and ink pots’. Single penny inkwells in good condition are selling for around $45.

The collection of 8 penny inkwells is in excellent vintage condition, and is for sale: POA

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Bakelite perfume-holder

Bourjois bakelite owl perfume-holder
made in England, 1930s

I am very interested in bakelite, as you know: and blue bakelite is the rarest. I came across this owl-shaped perfume holder, and though it is a little time-worn, I had to have him.

The owl was made to open at the back to take a bottle of ‘Evening in Paris’ perfume. He would have been in every elegant ladies bag in the 30s. It’s made of ‘marbleised’ bakelite : and when you open it you can see the colour of the original [now eighty-year old] bakelite. But his eyes, hinges and feathery detail are all still intact.

The inscription on the back reads: ‘Bourjois, London-Paris, Reg No 825,003, Made in England’. I love the idea of a perfume-holder; no-one uses them these days. You are considered sophisticated if you walk around with perfume in your backpack. This owl harks back to the 30s- and days of glamour!

I’ve teamed the bakelite owl with a plastic telephone toy from the 50s. I kinda like the disparaging look on the owl’s face…

The bakelite perfume-holder is for sale: $AU40

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1940s doctors bag

1940s cow hide case,
made in Australia

This is a fabulous ‘barrel-shaped’ case, possibly a doctor’s bag or briefcase, from the 40s. It is made of ‘genuine cow hide’ – as it attests on the interior label, although the leather has been tricked-up to resemble crocodile skin.

The case is in fantastic shape for its age- lock and key still work, hinges in-tact, handles and bottom studs all in-tact. The interior is also in remarkable shape- it’s red tartan-lined with two interior pockets. It would make [and indeed has made me] a wonderful overnight bag.

Suitcases and doctor’s bags from the 30s and 40s are now super collectable; and clean, pristine vintage cases are so much nicer to travel with than modern cases.

The doctors bag is for sale: $AU125

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