Shalom! and Merry Christmas!

Shalom ceramic wall tile and a Christmas storyA Christmas Story, by Richard Burton, 1966
Shalom ceramic tile, c.1960s

Shalom and Merry Christmas! These two pieces have a lovely synchronicity, in shape, colour and form. The funky symbol of Shalom- Hebrew for peace- has a handwritten message on its timber back – ‘Jerusalem’ which I take to be its place of manufacture. The deep blue and orange of the ceramic tile are so very 60s. The tile is framed and has a hook for hanging on its back- this Shalom is meant for display.

Meanwhile Richard Burton- THE Richard Burton -has written a story about his [impoverished] Welsh childhood and subsequent Christmases. He also provided the illustrations. Apparently an acTOR and an author/illustrator. It’s a bit of a turgid read, but this book was continually republished until the late 80s. Must have been doing something right. I bought it mainly for the lovely graphics on the hardback cover.

Wishing all my readers Shalom, and Merry Christmas! And I am sure Richard Burton would want to add his wishes also.

This set is for sale: $AUD45

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Kelco espresso set ‘Tulip’

Kelco espresso set 'Tulip'Kelco espresso set
made in Japan, c.1960s

This charming espresso set of six cups and saucers comes in its original box: it’s never been used.

Largardo Tackett designed this set for Kelco – for the 60s European market. It’s called ‘Tulip’ [pattern K-41] and features abstract tulip shapes. I’ve seen the set in reds, blues and black and white…but I like this orange set the best. They weren’t shy about colour in the 60s, and the orange has been repeated on the saucer.

I’ve posted Kelco before…I am drawn to the simple, modernist shaping and the strong colours.

The espresso set would brighten a modern, monochrome kitchen and lend a certain retro aesthetic to the dining table. The set is for sale: $AUD85

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Hanstan coffee pot

Hanstan coffee pot & mugs
made in Australia, 1970s

Hanstan pottery was a collaboration between Hans Wright and Stan Burrage – hence Hanstan- that started in Victoria in 1962. The pottery continued to make domestic ware pottery well into the 1980s. Hanstan collectors will know that the pottery is always two-tone: either matt white and mission brown, or 70s orange and misson brown. The brown part of the pottery is rough glazed to contrast with the smooth slip glaze of the other colour.

The coffee pot, collectors will also know – is now quite rare and hard to find. I have had the mugs and the matching sugar bowl for some time, and the coffee pot, completing the set, has only just been found. All pieces are in excellent vintage condition; the coffee pot is completely unstained and looks like it’s never been used.

I also have examples of Hanstan white/brown pottery- spice jars and a salt pig – elsewhere on this blog.

The Hanstan coffee set is for sale: $AU125

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3 black cats

Black Cat condiment tray
made in Japan, 1950s

Three Black Cats walk into a bar…two are salt and pepper shakers, the third is for mustard. Or for toothpicks- who knows what those crazy 50s people were thinking?

I love this set: the black cats all look slightly crazed and ready for action, and yet they are on a lovely orange tray with handles: they are only condiments servers. On second thoughts, maybe they are black panthers…[my zoology knowledge is somewhat limited.]

For 50s collectors and cat collectors- the perfect combination: for sale- $AU45

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60s candlestick

Scheurich candlestick,
made in West Germany 1960s

By now you are all familiar with the term ‘fat lava’- the West German pottery that happened in the 60s and 70s that used crazy glazes, crazy shapes and crazy thick lava-esque patternings. Kinda grotesque at the time, but now much embraced and much celebrated.

Here is a more modestly coloured Scheurich candlestick. Although if orange wasn’t the colour of the 60s, I don’t know what was. And while Australians might call this a candle-holder; the European name for this device is a candlestick.

Like all Scheurich pottery, it has marks on the base: 255 /10. The first number is the pattern number, the second number is the height [in cm.] Those Scheurich potters!- so practical! I love the anti-gravity shape of the candlestick; and the colours of the candles I have teamed it with.

The candlestick has a tiny fleabite at the back, on the middle ring. I nearly didn’t buy it.  But it’s Scheurich, it’s fat lava, it’s a 60s candlestick! So, I have styled it with the fleabite to the back, and it is priced accordingly.

The Scheurich candlestick is for sale: $AU45

70s Australiana

Crystal Craft trivet, made in Australia 1970s
Wiltshire ‘Vogue’ cutlery, made in Australia 1970s

Crystal Craft has become uber trendy for collectors: it is a resin-covered fabric that originated in Queensland in the 70s. This is a super 70s trivet- just look at the forms and colours! And it is great that the piece has it’s original sticker on the base.

The ‘Vogue’ cutlery was designed for Wiltshire by Stuart Devlin- famous for his other work designing the images on Australian coins [all native fauna & flora.] This was his day job – but once those coins were minted I think he gave up his day job! The cutlery are ‘new in box’ never opened or used, and in great condition.

I styled these two items together – I love the 70s colours! – but am happy to sell them separately: $AU35 each.

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Jetset- jet….- set….

Jetset solid state radio & phonograph
made in Japan 1969

The radio and phonograph work on this portable turntable, which has the standard 33 and 45 settings, but I suspect a new stylus would improve the sound quality substantially. I like the way the phonograph arm is recessed into the body of the player, you can just see the round metal section that houses the needle, to the middle right of the housing. How good would it be to take it on a picnic and play some old vinyl?

The Jetset runs on mains power – or- takes 4 x c size batteries- it is good to go, or on the go.

The aluminium knobs are a little scuffed- probably from 40 years of use, but other than that, this lovely orange portable radio/turntable is good to go.  For sale: $AUD95

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Fat Lava

Scheurich pottery,
made in West Germany 1960-70s

I have come to embrace the ‘fat lava’ craze for West Germany pottery only recently. One thing that helped was seeing the pottery in its homeland when I visited Berlin- and another thing that has helped has been time; I grew up with this stuff and hated it as a youngster!

‘Fat lava’ refers to the glaze type which is typically chunky and classically 70s in form and colour. The pieces shown here are from our personal collection – we decided to collect in orange and red. There are a million varieties of these shapes in every conceivable colour variation…but due to popularity and [crazy collectors] they are becoming harder to find.

One of my favourite collectors is someone who has collected the one Scheurich shape and form – [it happens to be the middle of the red pieces shown here] and has over 70 varieties of it. They look fantastic displayed together – this is a case where more- IS more!

Hawaii 5-0!

Hawaii souvenir wall plaque
made in Japan, 1960s

Careening right back into kitsch territory, this is a Hawaiian souvenir from the 60s- made in Japan! It’s a wall plaque- how good would this look hanging in a contemporary interior? Very, very good!

The plaque is hand painted, and features a dancing hula girl, Hawaiian beachscape, complete with flowers, palm tree and background volcano; all framed in a pineapple. Because nothing says Hawaii like a pineapple!

The plaque is in excellent vintage condition and ready to hang. It’s for sale: $AU15

60s kitschiness [is my kinda kitschiness]

60s kitschinessMelbourne tray, made in Hong Kong, 1960s
Hornsea sugar bowl, made in England, 1960s
Diana ramekins, made in Australia, 1960s.

An ode to 60s kitschiness – a bar tray featuring the beautiful city of Melbourne in the 60s- terrible image, much touched-up and with an explanatory label; a green ‘Heirloom’ sugar bowl, stoneware designed and produced by John Clappison in 1966 for Hornsea; and a pair of Diana ramekins, made in Marrickville, Sydney in the late 60s.

A range of 60s aesthetics: the tacky, the patterned and the late-modernist. All now very desirable and collectable. People collect bar-themed paraphenalia [‘barphenalia’] – Hornsea is oh-so collectable now, and Diana pottery [and ramekins especially] is becoming very desirable.

All these items are in good vintage condition, and are for sale: Melbourne bar tray: $AU20, Hornsea Heirloom sugar bowl: $AU25, and the Diana ramekins: $AU20.