60s kitschiness [is my kinda kitschiness]

60s kitschinessMelbourne tray, made in Hong Kong, 1960s
Hornsea sugar bowl, made in England, 1960s
Diana ramekins, made in Australia, 1960s.

An ode to 60s kitschiness – a bar tray featuring the beautiful city of Melbourne in the 60s- terrible image, much touched-up and with an explanatory label; a green ‘Heirloom’ sugar bowl, stoneware designed and produced by John Clappison in 1966 for Hornsea; and a pair of Diana ramekins, made in Marrickville, Sydney in the late 60s.

A range of 60s aesthetics: the tacky, the patterned and the late-modernist. All now very desirable and collectable. People collect bar-themed paraphenalia [‘barphenalia’] – Hornsea is oh-so collectable now, and Diana pottery [and ramekins especially] is becoming very desirable.

All these items are in good vintage condition, and are for sale: Melbourne bar tray: $AU20, Hornsea Heirloom sugar bowl: $AU25, and the Diana ramekins: $AU20.

Crystal Craft!

Crystal Craft 'Daisy' trivet & 4 coastersCrystal Craft ‘Daisy’ trivet and coasters
made in Australia 1960s

Crystal Craft! I have watched in astonishment as Crystal Craft has become incredibly collectible. Think the wired daisies with faces that proliferated in the 70s, and those resin daisy coasters with broad smiles in bright colours.

This is a collection of Crystal Craft ‘Daisy’- resin trivet and matching coasters. If you, or anyone you know has a Crystal Craft addiction – then – call a help line, or buy them this collection.

This collection was made in Australia – it would make a great Christmas present. For sale: $AU65

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70s telephone intercom phones [sold]

Telefon children's intercom toy telphones, 1970sTelefon children’s telephone toy
made in Germany, c.1970s

How cute are these push button intercom phones! A friend of mine who received them as a birthday present in the 70s [his was garish blue and white] said that his mother would ‘call’ him in his bedroom to tell him his dinner was ready! How cute!

This set has never been used, and comes in its original box. They are made ‘for ages 3 and up’, have 10m [33ft] of wire to allow use in different rooms, and take two 9V batteries. This is the pre-wireless age, peoples!

A perfect [nostalgic] Christmas present for someone 3 and up!

For sale: $AU75

Johnson OF Australia

Johnson Bros [Aust] dinner plates, 1975Johnson OF Australia dinner plates
made in Queensland, Australia 1975

The back stamp of these 70s plates is Johnson OF Australia – [reminds me of Lawrence OF Arabia!] Johnson Bros [Australia] produced transfer printed stoneware crockery marketed as “tough, utilitarian ware” – which is why these plates are looking so fresh and unblemished today.

Johnson Bros [Australia] was a division of Johnson Brothers England- at the time one of the largest domestic pottery producers in the world. This design wasn’t given a name or a pattern number, but the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney has a record of the design: it is described as a “complex radial design with central sunflower”. The plate was collected and added to the Powerhouse collection by a Melbourne artist John Hind.

I have recently started to embrace the 70s – and Australiana from the 70s; and now I have an Instagram account, I have been seeing much 70s Australiana – and Johnson’s plates are much celebrated. There is one fantastic site where Johnson pieces are cut and sanded to make upcycled jewellery: rings and necklaces. It’s a lovely celebration of 70s iconography and the ‘tough, utilitarian ware’ that the Johnson Bros never imagined.

These two dinner plates are for sale: $AU40

70s pavlova platter

70s pavlova recipe platterIdeal Ironstone Ware Pavlova platter,
made in Japan c.1970s

Pavlova is my favourite food- and I often request a pavlova for my birthday cake. Pavlova is a giant meringue dessert named for the Russian ballet dancer Anna Pavlova -it was created in her honour after one of her tours to Australia and New Zealand in the 1920s. The meringue plays homage to the ballerina’s tutu and her ‘light as air’ dance movements. It is a bone of contention between the two countries as to who actually invented the pavlova, but really the evidence comes down on the side of New Zealand.

These platters are fantastic: not only do you get a fool-proof recipe, you cook the pavlova directly on the plate [SO handy.] AND – they are great for cooking pizzas too. I’m sure you could cook all sorts of stuff on the ceramic surface…. but I only know how to cook pavlova and pizza.

The platters are made by Ideal Ironstone Ware- featured recently in my series of ‘realism’ plates. Ideal describes itself on the back of the platter as: “World’s Finest Ironstone; Oven-Proof and Craze-Proof.” Here we have a completely delightful orange 70s design- and the all important recipe.

The pavlova platter is for sale: $AUD40

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Crown Corning [sold]

Pyrex pie dishes, new in boxCrown Corning pie dishes
made in Australia, 1970s

I love the funky 70s graphics on these boxes; almost more than the pie dishes themselves. The dishes are ‘as new’ – never been out of the box; and are a large 10” scalloped dish in orange and a medium 8” scalloped dish in ‘apricot’ [as described on the box.] The original ‘Crown Ovenware Guarantee’ is there too- not sure if it’s still good after 40 or so years…

Crown Corning made domestic wares under the ACI glass label in Australia. These fancy scalloped dishes were responsible for countless quiches, tuna mornays and apple pies; the glass allows an even cooking and they are a dream to wash up afterwards- just don’t put them in the dishwasher!

The pie dishes are for sale: $AUD65

60s perpetual calendar

60s perpetual calendarPerpetual calendar
made in Queensland, Australia c 1960s

Ah, the sixties. When no subject was too prosaic to provide a backdrop for a perpetual calendar. The Sunshine Plantation grew and continues to grow pineapples – it’s on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland [I visited as a youngster.]

The pineapple is traditionally a symbol of hospitality – or wealth. In Australia it comes in cans and can be found on pizzas and Big Macs. But recently the humble pineapple has become somewhat of a style icon, adorning everything in interiors from large format pictures to timber-turned bedposts. So I present to you- a perpetual calendar and two toothpick holders from the 60s. And a real pineapple for comparison purposes.

Add to your burgeoning pineapple collection, or begin one with these beauties. Every desk needs a perpetual calendar- and every office a toothpick holder upcycled to thumb-drive storage. You just can’t have too many pineapples!

The perpetual calendar is for sale: $AUD45 [toss in the two toothpick holders for free.]

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Collectible Pyrex

Pyrex pie dishesPyrex pie dishes
made in Australia c1960s

Following on from my last Pyrex post, here’s Trish’s Pyrex collection- coloured pie dishes made in the 60s. The pie dishes came in a vast rainbow of colours that co-ordinated with other kitchen items- condiment dishes and mixing bowls and the like. Trish has kept her collection to yellow, orange, red which works well in our contemporary kitchen.

The tempered glass is still fantastic for cooking pies: we favour meat pies and lemon meringue tarts…they cook quickly and evenly and the dish is a dream to wash up afterwards. The pie dishes come in four standard sizes and so nest when not in use; you gotta love vintage that still functions as intended and also looks good.

The only downside is they are not dishwasher proof; you do see a lot of ruined Pyrex dishes around- the colour does not stand up to the harsh detergent abrasives and becomes mottled and washed out in tone.

 

60s Pyrex

Pyrex canistersPyrex ‘Stack & See’ canisters
made in USA, c.1968

I use these canisters- with their funky 60s colours – to store my retro sewing collection. Any sort of see-through canister is great for re-use – as is stackability – a great 60s invention. These Pyrex canisters came in 4 different sizes- the largest is shown here.

You can collect the canisters in the colour-ways; green, yellow, orange, red or blue: make sure the sealing ring is intact; and that the Pyrex motif is on the base- there are a few fake imitations around. They don’t make them like they used to.

60s sunflowers

Ridgway 'Soleil' plattersRidgway Ironstone ‘Soleil’ platters
made In Stroke-on-Trent, England 1960s

Ironstone is a vitreous pottery first made in England in the late Eighteenth Century as a cheaper mass-produced alternative to porcelain. Ridgeway was in production in Stoke-on-Trent from 1790 to 1964; and these platters were one of the last productions of the pottery.

‘Soleil’ – as in Cirque du Soleil- as soleil means “sun” – is a sunflower motif. I love the broad, elongated shape of these platters emphasised with a border- with a pure circular inset with its abstract sunflowers. These platters would look great hung on a wall. Forget whacking food on them- this is 60s art at its best!

The platters are in excellent condition and are for sale: $AUD55

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