Sellex canister set

Selex canister setSellex bakelite kitchen canister set
made in Australia c. 1940s

I have posted Sellex canisters previously – but this is an entire set, which is now rare to find. It’s a transfer label, white bakelite set consisting of Flour, Tea, Sugar, Rice and Sago. The Tea label has now been lost- probably due to over-use..but you notice the Sago label is still going strong….I’m just saying.

These canisters would look great in a monochrome white modernist kitchen.

This delicious creamy-white, hard-worn bakelite canister set is for sale; $AUD95

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Sellex canister set

Selex canister setSellex bakelite kitchen canister set
made in Australia c. 1940s

I have posted Sellex canisters previously – but this is an entire set, which is now rare to find. It’s a transfer label, white bakelite set consisting of Flour, Tea, Sugar, Rice and Sago. The Tea label has now been lost- probably due to over-use..but you notice the Sago label is still going strong….I’m just saying.

These canisters would look great in a monochrome white modernist kitchen.

This delicious creamy-white, hard-worn bakelite canister set is for sale; $AUD95

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1940s glamour

1940s beaded clutch & chokerGlass pearl beaded clutch and choker, made in Japan c.1940s
Midwinter lamb figurines, made in England 1946-1953

This beautiful clutch and matching choker belonged to my friend Susan’s grandmother. Susan’s grandmother kept them safely in their original box, bringing them out only to wear on special occasions. The beading detail is delightful, and is entire [one lady owner!]- I can just imagine the outfits that this ensemble would complete.

At first glance, the beaded clutch and choker and the lamb figurines are an unusual pairing – but both are of the same era. And both hint at joyous and exuberant occasions!

WR Midwinter [Burslem, Staffordshire] is famous for its small, appealing animals- it started producing in 1910 and is still producing today. These frolicking lambs –produced between 1946 and 1953- are now quite collectible. And a pair is better than a single. [I saw a single on Ebay for $55.]

The glass pearl encrusted clutch and matching choker is for sale: $AUD155
The Midwinter pair of lamb figurines : $AUD75

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10″ slide rules

10” slide rules
Hemmi, made in Japan, c.1954
Aristo, made in Japan, c. 1960
Royal, made in Japan, c.1960

The first slide rulers were developed in the C17th, for mathematical calculations. They were used consistently from this date until 1974, when they were replaced by the scientific calculator. The middle section moves between scales on top and bottom of the scales, and then an independent clear plastic slider is moved to allow the calculation to be read.

These 10” slide rulers [250mm] were made for the office; they are larger and allow more complex calculations that the smaller 5” portable scale rules […yes..they will appear in a previous post…I can’t help it…I love them!]

The Hemmi slide [topmost in the image] has a bamboo structure, with a plastic laminate covering; whilst the later slide rules are all solid plastic. All slide rules come in their own boxes [some with original operating instructions] and some have their original owners names incised on the box.

For sale: $AUD85

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Lyndale Moss Pottery

Lyndale Moss pottery, 1950sLyndale Moss pottery
made in Melbourne, Australia 1950s

It’s Australia Day! Not celebrated or acknowledged by all Australians- but – who could resist this Australiana?

These are Lyndale Moss gum-leaf vases, and a eucalypt vase. It’s the 50s, and nationalism is starting to become a cultural force. Art potteries everywhere are forgoing the English rose for Australian-themed flora. And producing vases in all manner of colours [to suit the 50s décor]: pink, blue, yellow, black, spotted and drip-glazed: but for my money, the lovely matt-white is the best.

Lyndale didn’t sign the pottery- they relied on semi-permanent stickers [in gilt writing, no less] to note the maker. It’s rare that these stickers survived from the 50s, so if you find one with the sticker in-tact- you are sitting on a gold mine.

Happy Australia Day! Wherever and however you celebrate; these vases are for sale: $AU45

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60s flipclock

cifra 3 solari flipclockcifra 3 flipclock
made in Italy 1965

Gizmodo calls this the “greatest clock ever made” [http://www.gizmodo.com] and I totally agree. It is both minimalist and futuristic; with Helvetica font for the numbers to boot.

Designed by Gino Valle for Solari di Undine in 1965, the clock has been sold at MOMA, and is featured in the Science Museum in London. In 1970 the clock was priced at US$32 – which is about US$200 nowadays! It was an expensive clock to buy in its day. It was made in white, red and green – and being the 60s that meant pillar box red and emerald – I like the minimalism of the white clock with black & white flip numbers.

I found the clock at the bottom of a box of computer spare parts at a second hand shop. I had no idea if it would work – but figured I could just gaze at its loveliness even if it didn’t. The battery case was clean [no leaky battery to suggest that’s why it was tossed into the box] and the perspex front was unscratched so I took a punt and bought it.

Well- the clock works a treat- and keeps good time…but at midnight turning from 23:59 to 0:00 the hour flip doesn’t flip [the minute flipping continues on.] When I come into the office at 8ish or 9ish each morning I have to reset the hour flip. It’s become a daily ritual- which I quite like. It’s fifty years old so a bit of a pick me up in the morning is quite justified.

30s vases [sold]

McCredie vasesMcCredie vases
made in Sydney, Australia 1930s

Nell McCredie was an architect before she opened her pottery studio in Epping, Sydney in 1932 to make fine art pottery by hand. McCredie continued to produce pottery right up to her death in 1968, and she was interested in art and design in all her work – as she said:

“Pottery-making is definitely an art inasmuch as the design is a purely individual thing. The technique of moulding is mechanical but the conception and execution of a design is an art -a fascinating art.” [Where Pottery is made by Hand, SMH, Oct 20 1936.]

McCredie made vases and domestic ware – often with this distinctive white matt outer glaze and a contrasting coloured shiny interior glaze. The forms were simple and strong, quite different to a lot of 30s and 40s pottery- and often with the ‘ribs’ seen on these vases.

I’ve styled the vases with Waratah and Gerbras- the single colour flower looks fantastic with the monochrome vase. As with all her pottery, the vases are hand-signed on the base: ‘McCredie N.S.W.’

The two vases are for sale: $AUD150

Australian pottery history [sold]

McCredie potteryMcCredie pottery
made in Sydney, Australia 1930-1940

Following from my last post, here are some more archetypal works from the Architect-turned-potter Nell McCredie.

Five pieces that evidence McCredie’s idiosyncratic matt white outer-glaze, with a cool green shiny inner glaze. The pieces are: [from back to front] – a gondola vase [with attached frog, as you’d expect]; a posey floating vase; two smaller ‘tulip’ vases and a pin dish [read ‘ashtray’ by a more acceptable name.]

Some of the pieces evidence internal crazing due to age…these pieces were all hand-made eighty years ago. As with all her work, McCredie’s pottery is hand signed on the base: ‘McCredie N.S.W.‘

These five pieces of Australian history are for sale: $AUD245

Peony Ware

Peony Ware double-sided dishPeony Ware double handled dish
made in Japan c.1950s

Avid readers of this blog will know that due to my [real] life as a landscape architect, I am a sucker for all things botanical. Especially 50s kitschy botanical. This Peony Ware plate- featuring- Peonies….ticks all the boxes.

Peony Ware started manufacturing slip-cast raised ‘peony’ jugs, plates, tea cups and vases in the 50s as a response to the popularity of Carlton Ware. The quality of the peonies isn’t that of Carlton Ware- although it is hand-painted and the peonies are raised -it was sold as a sort of cheaper version; and only featured peonies. Carlton Ware in the 50s was producing Fox Glove, Wild Rose, Buttercup, Apple Blossom….while Peony Ware pumped out the peonies in every conceivable colour.

This is a double-sided, handled dish- with the peony in a modest cream colour- in excellent condition. It is stamped ‘Peony Ware, made in Japan’ on the underside. I’ve teamed it with a 50s figurine of a dog in a jumpsuit- the colourings and the size of the figurine seem to work well.

The peony dish is for sale: $AUD55

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The family that prays together, stays together…

Religious icons- 50sReligious icons, made in Australia c. 1950s

I love this group of icons. The colours, the forms, the ensemble. The first, Jesus with a timber fan – cum halo, stands on a polished timber plinth giving the peace sign. The middle icon- hand painted perhaps by someone in a hurry- has Mary with a somewhat shifty look, and Joseph looking like a harried hippy [could that haircut be any more unfortunate?] As for baby Jesus- is it just me, or is he a ventriloquist doll?

The final icon features Mary arms outstretched, standing on an orb that while representing the earth, is the colour of her dress and head scarf, and which itself is on a bakelite plinth. Mary’s face is featureless- it’s all about the clothes- she is just a cipher.

The trio form an interesting group representing religious iconography of the 50s. In Australia. In the 50s.

The icons are for sale: $AUD75

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