Collectable Hornsea

Hornsea Saffron breakfast set
made in England, 1970s

Here we have a lovely breakfast set: egg cup and salt & pepper shakers- with teak lids- in a teak tray.

Hornsea is famous for its 70s patterns; always two apposite colours in a geometric pattern. I’ve showcased them all: Saffron, Heirloom and Bronte.

I grew up with this 70s oppositional style: and have only now come to embrace it again. Especially now it’s so collectable! I have styled the egg cup with wattle: it kinda recalls the yolk and i like how even a humble egg cup can become a vase.

The breakfast set is in great vintage condition, and is for sale: $AU35

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Fun Ho!

Fun Ho! road roller
made in New Zealand 1972

What a great name for a toy: Fun Ho! These diecast models [called “midget scale”] were made in New Zealand to take on Dinky and Matchbox diecast toys.

This road roller is #37, and is in great vintage condition [note that it hasn’t been repainted – a fate suffered by a lot of diecast toys.] On Ebay, these models, sans box, sell for around $30.

Diecast toys are very collectable – particularly industrial vehicles and caravans; so this road roller is pretty cool. I like the bright orange colour, so- naturally- I teamed it with an actual orange [for scale purposes, you understand.]

The road roller is for sale: $AU20
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Electronic calculator

Sharp electronic calculator,
made in Japan 1977

An electronic calculator, I hear you say! Ten digit with VFD? Yes- VFD [vacuum fluorescent display.] [Ok, I had to look it up.] But ten digits! In bright green fluro display.

This is the Compet, CS-1109A electronic calculator, made in 1977. With absolutely fantastic 70s styling – including the key fonts and colours. I love everything about this calculator!

Check out www.vintagecalculators.com and read about their take on the ol’ CS-1109A. And also Ebay has a vintage calculator category. Vintage calculators!

The vintage electronic calculator is in great condition, and could be yours for $AU85

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70s goblets

Diana ‘Safari’ goblets
made in Australia 1970s

My regular readers know how much I love Diana pottery- made in a pottery near where I now live, in Marrickville, Sydney from 1940 to 1975. I especially love the 40s and 50s pottery…and until recently have not so much enjoyed the 70s [having actually lived through it in Australia– it was rough.]

BUT now I have a photographer son- who takes all my images- and he totally embraces the 70s. Where I see brutalist brutalism, he sees a weird, fresh take on colour and form.

I have not- I note- seen him embrace my love of the 40s and 50s. I have tried. Lord knows. Parental responsibility is taken seriously. But- no dice. Clearly, we can only embrace that which we have not personally lived through. Until… we see it through fresh eyes.

For Diana ‘Safari’ aficionados- I have other pieces available on the blog. And- the goblets are for sale: $AU25.  They are in great vintage condition.
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70s Australiana

Crystal Craft trivet, made in Australia 1970s
Wiltshire ‘Vogue’ cutlery, made in Australia 1970s

Crystal Craft has become uber trendy for collectors: it is a resin-covered fabric that originated in Queensland in the 70s. This is a super 70s trivet- just look at the forms and colours! And it is great that the piece has it’s original sticker on the base.

The ‘Vogue’ cutlery was designed for Wiltshire by Stuart Devlin- famous for his other work designing the images on Australian coins [all native fauna & flora.] This was his day job – but once those coins were minted I think he gave up his day job! The cutlery are ‘new in box’ never opened or used, and in great condition.

I styled these two items together – I love the 70s colours! – but am happy to sell them separately: $AU35 each.

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Lomography

Debonair camera, made in Hong Kong 1967
Observer books, published 1958- 1975

I love old cameras – which now have a new life as lomography cameras. This Debonair “all plastic” camera was made in the 50s- it takes 120 film, and had a ‘super lens no. 809’.

It’s a point-and-shoot camera, fixed f/8 lens. Luckily 120mm film is still available – and – did I mention that lomography photos are uber cool?

Meanwhile, I also collect Observer books. This lovely series [1-100] started in the UK with no.1 British Birds published in 1937; and to collect all 100 in series is a prise.

Here we have a couple of my doubles:
1          Birds                1971
11        Aircraft             1958
21        Automobiles    1975
41        Heraldry          1966

However- you have already seen that the first in the series has been reprinted under many titles, and dates. And- to add to the collector enthusiasm- real enthusiasts only collect nos. 1 – 79, when the outer cover became hardback [with an image, no less.] So gauche.

Some Observer collectors just collect every edition of one published number. Some Observer collectors collect the first editions of every title. The rest of us are happy to have as many of the 1- 100 series in our collections.

The Debonair camera is for sale: $AU18
Observers [with dust jackets]: AU$10 each

Golliwogs #70sstyle

Basic Soft Toys
by Sister Mary Bertrand, published by Reed, 1974, Wellington NZ

So – Sister Bertrand – shows you how to make golliwogs in 1974. I love this book! The goofiness, the un-PC quality, the terrible shot of St. Bertrand on the cover.

And I confess, I got her name mixed up with the flying nun – who was Sister Betrille.

Nineteen soft toy patterns : “every pattern is actual size”! Wow and hurray! if only I had the time/emotional energy to make every pattern in this book. I would. If only to realise the 1974 kitschiness / Sister Betrand factor.

I am asking you, dear reader, and dear soft toy maker, to do this on my behalf. Go on – I know you want to.

Plus – soft toy makers in NZ – I have thrown down the gauntlet. The soft toy gauntlet.

This wonderful tome is for sale: $AU15

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Upcycled tin clock [sold]

Upcycled clock,
Biscuit tin, made in Australia 1970s

An upcycled biscuit tin clock, featuring corgi puppies- not upcycled by me but by a friend. Such a great idea! the lid comes off to reveal the quartz clock movement, which takes an AA battery. A small hole drilled in the back of the tin allows the clock to be hung. Viola! vintage tin upcycled to functional timepiece.

The tin is 200mm x 120mm, with a depth of 80mm- which means that doggy figurine shown next to the clock, could quite easy model on top of the clock, once hung.

The clock will appeal to vintage lovers – and corgi puppy admirers. It is for sale: $AU18

Retro Ice buckets

Ice bucket collection

I collected these ice buckets because I loved the idea of using them with the bakelite blender [the ‘Vitamizer’, posted below] at cocktail parties. I am very partial to a martini, which while not strictly needing a blender, does require the service of an ice bucket. The blender was good for making frozen daiquiris, which my guests favoured. Either way – an ice bucket was totally necessary, and who wants to use a modern one?

I have ended up with a few ice buckets…and in researching these, I found quite a few avid collectors out there. People collect ice buckets. And why not- they look fantastic displayed together [and they’re good for storing ice…amongst other things…]

The bucket to the left in the image is made from Scandinavian teak, and has matching tongs.  The red plastic bucket has a brass handle, and has matching tongs. The only ice bucket with any branding – the Dia Ice Pail, made by Dia Vacuum bottle Industries Co. Ltd, is anodised aluminium and steel [with a ‘vacuum’ white plastic interior] and it comes with…you guessed it…matching tongs. Matching tongs are so important at a cocktail party.

For sale: $AUD75

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Australian linens [sold]

Australian linens
made in Australia, 1960s-70s

Here is a selection of Australian souvenir tea towels from the 60s and 70s. I love the colours and graphics of these linens- and since they have never been used [they are ‘new old stock’]- they remain vibrant. As souvenirware, the graphics are of Australian towns and feature Australian flora and fauna. Wattle, grevillea and koalas abound.

I bought these tea towels with the intention of making cushion covers [see examples in posts, below] – but came to the realisation that actually I have far too many and nobody could actually use a thousand pillows, not even in the most optimistic of circumstances.

The set comprises ten ‘as new’ linens, and they are for sale: $AU50