Slidex slide library

Hanimex Slidex slide library, 1950sHanimex ‘Slidex’ slide library
made in Australia 1950s

I love and collect Hanimex – slide projectors, slide viewers and now- a slide library. Each of the three drawers has flip out slide-holders [yellow, red, green] and each can hold 120 x 35mm slides. The slide library is pristine – never been used. Opposite the drawers is an index – to note the title of each of the twelve slide holders in each drawer- and the drawers themselves have a space for a label integral with the drawer pull. All you need is a typewriter: the index is removable and so can be inserted into a typewriter to be completed; and the drawer labels could similarly be typed. Tres tres cool!

Hanimex is an Australian company that commenced importing cameras and lenses in 1947. Jack Hannes started the company and the name Hanimex is an abbreviation of his company name: Hannes Import Export. By the mid 50s Hanimex was making and selling smaller photographic equipment –like this slide library- in Australia. Cameras that were still imported were rebadged Hanimex Topcon, the second name indicating the original manufacturer.

The precision engineering that has gone into making this compact, portable slide library is fantastic.

The slide library is for sale: team it with one of more of the other fantastic Hanimex products on this site! $AUD75

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60s slide projector

Hanimex Hanorama '300' slide projectorHanimex Hanorama ‘300’ slide projector
made in Australia c.1966

When I started this blog [two years ago] I had some Hanimex slide viewers [see post, way, way below.] I love slide viewers because my father was a photographer and lots of my childhood – and indeed other people’s childhoods and landscapes and tourist shots- were recorded on slides. We’d have slide nights at home where slide after slide was projected onto a white wall, accompanied by beer and chips. What larks!

Ok, back to my point. Since I started this blog – with the intention of showcasing my collection and trying to sell some of it- I have had to- HAD to – buy slide projectors. They just came to me. I am a slide projector MAGNET. I now have ten. In perfect, slide-projecting, order. This is number six. Isn’t she a beauty?

Lens: f=2.8/ 85mm. Lamp: 300 W, BA 15S short envelope lamp; still available today. Even if you never intend to use the projector it looks great as a display piece- with a fantastic 60s modernist vibe.

And for some reason, like all my other projectors, it comes with a Kodachrome slide from its last owners.

For sale: $AUD125

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Old school lomography

70s cameras- Hanimex 110TF & Polaroid ZipHanimex 110TF camera, made in Hong Kong 1970s
Polaroid Zip Land camera, made in USA 1970s

These old cameras are both perfect for lomography. The Hanimex ‘chocolate bar’ camera comes in its original box, with original 110 film and manual. The camera features a built-in-flash[!] and has a tele-lens converter- that is the lens moves from 25mm to 43mm. This camera was the height of sophistication in the 70s and now features in the Museum of Design in Plastics [MODIP] in the UK- see: www.modip.ac.uk. It also features on Oskar’s classic camera trials: a must for all budding lomographists- see- www.classiccameratrials.com

Meanwhile, the Polaroid Zip is also a beauty- what Polaroid isn’t? It uses 80 series film which is a square format no longer available. But the good folks on Instructables have posted how to convert 100 series film [larger and rectangular in shape] to 80 series. Bingo- lomography project! See: www.instructables.com

Great for an unusual Christmas present- or the budding lomographer who wants to do it old style, these cameras are ‘as new’ and are for sale: $AUD135

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Hanimex slide viewer

Hanimex slide viewerHanimex slide viewer
made in Australia, 1956-1960

This Hanimex ‘Pre-Viewer’ was marketed as an accompaniment to the Hanimex slide projector- you used the pre-viewer to select [and work out which way was ‘up’] the slides before loading them into the slide projector.

Of course, people who didn’t have a slide projector [and who could have afforded one in the 60s? except perhaps institutions] – used a pre-viewer as a slide viewer. Sure, it was laborious loading slides in one-by-one, but the instantaneous viewing was worth it. I’ve seen many people’s holiday snaps this way…although it does tend to cut down the quantity!

This snazzy slide viewer comes in its original box. It’s that funky 50s teal colour. It uses batteries, and a bulb which is still available. It still works a treat. The kookaburra card-holder which is photographed with the slide viewer, however, is part of my partner’s collection and was just borrowed to hold the slide. It is not for sale.

Hanimex Pre-Viewer: for sale- $AUD75

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Folding slide projector

OpenHanimex ‘Mini’ folding slide projector
made in Sydney, Australia c.1950s

This neat little projector folds out to show slides in both 16mm and 35mm slide formats. It has a P-Rokkor 2.5/40mm lens and uses a 75watt lamp; I have it on good authority that replacement lamps are still available. The projector works a treat – it’s been checked over by an electrician – and has an ‘automatic’ slide feed to allow you to load two slides at a time [!!] It comes in its original box, which sadly has been mended with masking tape.

Perfect for your next slide night or to add to your burgeoning Hanimex collection. I am reluctantly parting this projector- it’s a beautiful as well as a functional object. [I may have mentioned that I have nine [9!] slide projectors.]

The Mini is for sale: $AUD145

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Hanimex ‘Argus’ slide viewer [sold]

Argus slide viewerHanimex ‘Argus’ slide viewer
made in Australia, c.1960

Well, yes, I have posted quite a few slide viewers- I am so enamoured of them! This viewer comes in its original box, and as seems to always happen to me- it also comes with an Ektachrome slide from its previous owner.

The Argus requires two C batteries to light the internal bulb [bulbs still available] – and like most 50s slide viewers – the action of pushing a slide into the slot turns the viewer on. What a fun way to spend an afternoon- viewing slides one by one!

Or, if you are similarly afflicted like me, add the Argus to your growing stash of viewers- they look fantastic massed together. For irrefutable evidence of this- see my post featuring the Super Hanorama, Vistorama and Hama compact [all by Hanimex] below.

This slide viewer is for sale: $AUD55

35mm slide viewers [sold]

Hanimex 35mm slide viewersHanimex 35mm slide viewers : Super Hanorama, Vistarama and Hama compact
made in Australia c. 1964

The Vistarama and the Hama compact have their original boxes. The Super Hanorama uses natural diffused light to view slides- no batteries required. The Vistarama requires 4 C size batteries and the Hama Compact takes 2 penlight batteries. The Museum of Design in Plastics in the UK has a Vistarama as part of its exhibition.

The view sliders can be used to view slides, of course, but I think they look great –on display. Those funky 60s blues and greens!  and the funky 60s typefont. Lovely.

Hanimex Hanorama ‘300’ slide projector

Hanimex Hanorama ‘300’ slide projector
made in Australia c.1966

When I started this blog [five months ago] I had some Hanimex slide viewers [see post, way, way below.]  I love slide viewers because my father was a photographer and lots of my childhood – and indeed other people’s childhoods and landscapes and tourist shots- were recorded on slides. We’d have slide nights at home where slide after slide was projected onto a white wall, accompanied by beer and chips. What larks!

Ok, back to my point. Since I started this blog – with the intention of showcasing my collection and trying to sell some of it- I have had to- HAD to – buy slide projectors. They just came to me. I am a slide projector MAGNET. I now have four. In perfect, slide-projecting, order. This is the fourth. Isn’t she a beauty?

Lens: f=2.8/ 85mm. Lamp: 300 W, BA 15S short envelope lamp; still available today.

And for some reason, like all my other projectors, it comes with a Kodachrome slide from its last owners.

For sale: $AUD125

Buy Now

Hanimex ‘Mini’ folding slide projector

ClosedHanimex ‘Mini’ folding slide projector
made in Sydney, Australia c.1950s

This neat little projector folds out to show slides in both 16mm and 35mm slide formats. It has a P-Rokkor 2.5/40mm lens and uses a 75watt lamp; I have it on good authority that replacement lamps are still available. The projector works a treat – it’s been checked over by an electrician – and has an ‘automatic’ slide feed to allow you to load two slides at a time [!!] It comes in its original box, which sadly has been mended with masking tape.

Perfect for your next slide night or to add to your burgeoning Hanimex collection. I am reluctantly parting this projector- it’s a beautiful as well as a functional object.

For sale: $AUD145

Open

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