Fowler Ware nested pudding bowls

Fowler Ware pudding bowls
made in Australia 1940s

It is rare- very rare- to find a complete set of nested pudding bowls. Look at those fabulous 40s colours! And all in very good condition, too- ready to make puddings!

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

Fowler Ware also sold pudding bowls under the ‘Utility’ brand: these were white or cream, and while also made of stoneware, somewhat thicker and more ‘utilitarian’ than these harlequin pudding bowls. I have – as you can imagine- collected these as well!

The nested pudding bowls are in great vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU150

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Fowler Ware jug [sold]

Fowler Ware jug,
made in Australia 1930s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWI, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their graduated pudding bowls & jugs were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This is a blue and white striped jug from the 30s; the blue and white colours resembled English Cornish Ware and were the premium pieces produced in the 20s and 30s. Every day pieces- ‘Cream Ware’ were made under the Fowler’ Utility’ label, while the blue and white pieces- coffee pots, pudding bowls and jugs- have a Fowler Ware & Sons backstamp.

This jug appears never to have been used: it is pristine inside and out. Quite a rare find.

The Fowler Ware jug is for sale: $AU75

Pudding bowls [sold]

Fowler Ware pudding bowls,
made in Australia 1940s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This image shows the range of colours and sizes the pudding bowls were made in – and other posts evidence the rest! [I have collected a number of Fowler Ware pudding bowls….] The bowls and are still fit for purpose : I received a lovely christmas pudding made in one of these bowls- and after eating the pudding – I got to keep the bowl!

The large crimson and medium grey bowl are for sale : $AUD25 & $AU15 [or $30 for the pair.]

Australiana Kitchenalia [sold]

bakewells jug & bowl, fowler ware jugFowler Ware jugs & pudding basin
made in Australia 1940s

This set is a monochrome collection of Fowler Ware jugs and pudding bowl- in a creamy, off-white. Collecting in a single colour is quite dramatic, and these pieces look fantastic in a white or neutral toned kitchen. I was inspired by a friend who has about 15 off-white bowls sitting on the top of her kitchen cupboards- in that space below the ceiling.

These pieces are stoneware, and from the Fowler Ware ‘Utility’ range – perhaps off-white wasn’t as glamorous as the coloured pieces [see post below] and could be used every day.

The beauty of the off-white bowl is that any fruit/food/kitchen implement stored in them looks fantastic. And as mentioned in previous posts- the bowls are still great for…cooking puddings!

For sale: $AU80

40s kitchenalia

Fowler Ware jug & Ibis condiment setFowler Ware jug, made in Australia 1940s
Ibis ‘lotus’ condiment set, made in Australia 1940s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls and jugs were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand. I have posted quite a few Fowler Ware jugs – this one is had that quintessential 40s rounded body shape, and is in a drip glazed green- rather than the more usual solid glaze colour.

Ibis bakelite is hard to come by: not a lot of it was made as the small factory in Melbourne only operated for a short period between the wars.

This is a condiment set, with stand; the salt and pepper shakers have been fashioned as stylised lotuses. The openings for the salt and pepper is a recessed screwed section hidden under the stand. [This set has now sold.]

The Fowler Ware jug is for sale: $AU45

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Jugs [sold]

40s jugs: Bakewells & Fowler Ware2 jugs
made in Sydney, Australia 1940s

Here we have two jugs: the first – a green stripey jug made by Bakewells, and the second a pale yellow Fowler Ware jug- both made in local factories from whence I hail. Now no longer with us, I still like to collect from the potteries that were once in the inner-west of Sydney.

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their graduated pudding bowls and jugs were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand. Fowler Ware is now much sought after. This is a 2 pint jug – as attested by the incised backstamp.

Bakewells operated out of Erskineville- very close to where we now live. Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved from making bricks and pipes to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the 1920s, Bakewells was manufacturing vases [‘exclusive ware’] and domestic ware [pudding bowls and jugs] in a range of sizes and colours. This jug with its banded decoration calls to mind Cornish Ware;  a deliberate evocation

The two jugs are for sale: $AU90

A collection of 40s Australiana

Fowler Ware jug, tortoise shell knitting needles, Emu knitting pin gaugeFowler Ware jug
Tortoise Shell knitting needles
Emu knitting pin gauge, made in Australia 1940s

This collection was made in Australia in the 1940s.

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their graduated pudding bowls and jugs were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand. Here we have a 2 pint jug in yellow: it is marked as such in relief on the base.

The vintage tortoise shell knitting needles are much prized by knitters and artists alike : very collectable. Knitters like them because they are super flexible and so easier to work with, and artists refashion the needles into art / jewellery : see Etsy and Pinterest for examples. Because the material is so pliable artists use hot water to mould the needles into new shapes/patterns. This collection has twenty pairs of needles, up to needle gauge 6mm, which was the largest gauge made in this material.

And the Emu gauge is a classic bell-shaped gauge: its anodised aluminium in a fantastic green colour. It’s different from previous bell gauges in having the gauge holes in the middle, rather than the on the edge of the bell – and includes a tiny 1mm diameter hole for a size 19 needle. The logo of the emu as a ball of wool, with needles for legs at the top of the bell is a classic!

All three items in this collections are for sale separately:
The Fowler Ware jug : $AU40
20 pairs tortoise shell needles: $AU200
Emu knitting gauge: $AU25

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Fowler Ware [sold]

Fowler Ware bowl & jugFowler Ware mixing bowl & jug
made in Australia, c.1940s

Fowler Ware first began producing industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

Fowler Ware is now very collectible and becoming harder to obtain: particularly so the mixing bowls with pouring lip. The domestic ware was produced in a range of classic 40s colours: green, yellow, grey, crimson, blue and white. Here we have a large mixing bowl and matching jug in the pastel yellow. The two are a pair- both have matching incised rings around the base.

I’ve teamed the Fowler Ware pieces with a perspex board from an old reprographics factory – I like the framing qualities of the font board- as well as the yellow letters.

The mixing bowl & jug are for sale: $AUD75

40s pudding bowls [sold]

Fowler Pudding BowlsFowler Ware pudding bowls
made in Australia, c.1940s

I have posted Fowler Ware pudding bowls before; I do love them [and not just because they are good for making christmas puddings!]- the colours are fantastic and they look great in the kitchen holding fruit, eggs and take-away menus.

A complete set of 5 pudding bowls were made to be ‘nested’ and were always different colours. The three on display here represent the middle three sizes: the smallest and the largest bowls are missing. All three bowls are stamped with Fowler Ware Australia – and the colours, though made in the 40s presaged the 50s.

Three assorted sized bowls: yellow, green, crimson.  For sale : $AUD60

Vintage pudding bowls [sold]

Vintage Fowler pudding bowlsFowler Ware pudding bowls
made in Australia, c.1940s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This image shows the range of colours and sizes the pudding bowls were made in [although I haven’t included the largest size, or the off-white coloured bowls, the subject of the next post.] The bowls and are still fit for purpose : I received a lovely christmas pudding made in one of these bowls- and after eating the pudding – I got to keep the bowl!

Six assorted sized bowls: green, yellow, grey, crimson, blue.  For sale : $AUD120