Art deco Pierrots

Art deco pierrots from the 20sSitzendorf Pierrot pipe rest dish, made in Germany 1910-1920
Klimax Pierrot ceramic citrus juicer, made in Japan, 1920s

Here we have two Pierrots- one from Germany, the other from Japan, but both hailing from the 20s. The Sitzendorf porcelain pipe-rest dish has Pierrot reading a newspaper, as you do. Sitzendorf began porcelain production in 1760 and continues today; this dish has the double-crossed ‘S’ crown logo on the base, and is impressed with the no: 25044. Sitzendorf [or to give it its full title: Sitzendorf Porzellankfabrik Gebruder, Voight, AG] is now highly collectible.

Next to the paper reading Pierrot is a citrus juicer- sadly missing its jug. Perhaps you have the jug? – It was made in a simple lemon or orange shape, with appropriate colouring. This Pierrot is handpainted, and is impressed with a ‘K’ on the base- encased in a circle of tiny dots. Klimax, a porcelain factory in Japan, is most well-known for its handpainted Samurai and Geisha tea sets, and lustreware. Despite missing its jug, the juicer is still quite functional and the two Pierrots together make for a nice art deco ensemble.

The Pierrots are for sale: $AU75 [Sitzendorf] and $AU55 [Klimax]

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Pates vases

Pates vases, Sydney, 1940sPates vases
made in Sydney, Australia 1940s

Pates Pottery operated out of Belmore, Sydney from 1946 -1990. As you may have noticed, given the tenor of the posts of this blog, being a Sydneyite I have an affinity for the potteries that were producing domestic ware in the 40s, 50s and 60s.

Pates’ designs and colours were influenced by the 1950s furnishing and domestic colour trends; and like Diana pottery – another Sydney pottery operating between the wars [and examples of which are in a couple of posts below] produced vases in baby blue, powder pink and pastel yellow. Pates, however, also continued to use a dual- drip coloured glaze– as evidence in these four vases.

The quite deco-shaped vase in front is a wall vase: designed to be hung on the wall and filled with flowers. The swan and fish-shaped vases are very typical of the animal themed vases made in the 40s. And the last posy vase has restrained deco-shaping; it’s an attempt to transition from the 20s to the 50s.

Start your Pates collection today! The four vases are for sale: $AUD125

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Art deco napkin rings

Art deco napkin ringsArt deco napkin rings
made in Japan c1920s

This is a fabulous set of art deco napkin rings; abstract bird-shaped, hand-painted and made in Japan. Vintage sets are increasingly hard to find – single pieces can sometimes be found but these four have always been together as a set.

The colour of the hand-painted glaze and the condition is excellent; these ‘birdie’ napkin rings are ready to dress your vintage table.

The set is for sale: $AUD80

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Kookaburra souvenirware

40s souvenir plate40s souvenirware plate
made in Japan

Souvenirware printed with a kookaburra or a kangaroo in Japan was exported all across Australia in the 40s and 50s; the ‘greetings’ handpainted by the recipient- not always terribly professionally- as seen here. I like the combination of the printed kookaburra and the naive handpainted greeting; it epitomizes Australia of this era.

Taree is a small country town on the mid-north coast of NSW. It is an agricultural town, but that doesn’t mean that sourvenirware should necessarily showcase agricultural products. The kookaburra is an internationally known icon- and visitors wanting an Australian souvenir would be drawn to it. Only the name of the town changed!

The 40s plate, marked ‘Made in Japan’ on the underside, has some subtle art deco stylings in the shaping, making it somewhat quaint. Altogether- a fine thing.

The plate is for sale: $AUD35

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Styling with retro vases

Pates pottery vaseFollowing from the last post- here is an example of Pates Pottery that I collect- those with an ‘Australiana’ colour glaze of brown and green – apparently reminiscent of the Australian bush. This nationalistic colour combination was very popular in the 50s, and since I am a landscape architect, and quite fond of the Australian bush, I have tended to collect Pates pieces in this colour range.

This quite deco-shaped vase has a removable ‘frog’ in the centre, in the same glaze. The frog is shaped with holes to support flower stems at the angle required…in this image I have attempted some free-form Ikebana, with Banksia flowers. That’s the great thing about retro vases- they lend a certain gravitas to one’s attempt at flower arranging!

Pates pottery vases

Pates pottery vases [50s]Pates Pottery vases
made in Sydney Australia, c.1950s

These beautiful vases were made by Pates Pottery, which operated out of Belmore, Sydney from 1946 -1990. As you may have noticed, given the tenor of the posts of this blog, being a Sydneyite I have an affinity for the potteries that were producing domestic ware in the 40s, 50s and 60s.

Pates’ glaze colours were influenced by the 1950s furnishing and domestic colour trends; the stippled pink and green is typical of this period. Also typical, but harking back to the Art Deco – are the forms and shapes of the pieces. Pates pottery had a foot in both camps- shapes that were very familiar but in colours that were funky and 50s.

The three vases here are: Deco wall vase, posey ‘scroll’ vase and a stylized ‘log’ peony vase. All in top order and ready to receive flowers. I’m particularly fond of the wall vase- we don’t see enough of them in homes today- and it’s a great idea to hang flowers rather than take up table space.

The three vases are for sale: $AUD95

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Art deco bakelite lidded glass box [sold]

Art deco glass box bakelite lid20s bakelite lidded glass box
made in Australia

Today’s item is a moulded glass container with yellow bakelite lid. The art deco styling to this container is unmistakable, as is the seamed, chunky glass cruciform shape. The container is unmarked; while the lid has only ‘Made in Australia’ in relief on the underside of the bakelite lid.

These lidded containers came in a variety of colours- a blue, red, green- and this yellow. The containers were produced for the living room- to display foodstuffs that didn’t require an airtight seal- sweets or chocolates after a meal perhaps.

It would be lovely to have a full set of the four coloured containers, but in the meanwhile this one is for sale. It’s getting harder to find bakelite-lidded containers in such good condition; particularly yellow bakelite which can fade and mottle over time.

For sale: $AUD45

Art Deco candle holder

Art Deco candle holderArt Deco candle holder
made in Australia c.1920s

Here we have a delightful candle holder made in the 1920s. It came from an Estate sale where I met and got chatting to the grand-daughter of the original owner. She knew the candle holder was from the 20s because her grandmother had talked with much affection about its purchase- and long use since then.

The candle holder is unmarked- not uncommon for pottery pieces produced just after the war- but the green glaze and the stylistic influences are classic Art Deco. As is the integral handle- made from the upsweep of the base- all very modern in the 20s and anticipating the modernism of the 50s.

I have teamed the candle holder with a pair of 20s cast iron kookaburras from my partner’s collection [you will recall she is exceptionally fond of kookaburras.] Although they are of the same era, the kookaburras look crude next to the sleek modernism of the candle holder.

The candle holder has some crazing to the glaze at the top [click on the image for a zoomed view]- but that is to be expected from something nearly 100 years old. Other than that it’s in good nick and is for sale : $AUD75

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Pates posey vase

Pates posey vasePates posey vase
made in Sydney, c 1940s

This posey vase was made by Pates Pottery, which operated out of Belmore, Sydney from 1946 -1990. The deco styling of the vase is deliberate, although it was made much after that period; it seems nostalgia for things past [and styles familiar and remembered] has always influenced pottery makers.

The drip glazes used by Pates were applied by hand, and the vases came in mottled shades of pinks, yellows, and green & brown- indeed it is this mottled glaze that instantly identifies this vase as a Pates vase. The vase is also stamped on the base “Pates Potteries Sydney Australia.”

This lovely green and brown vase is perfect to display wattle – the joey figurine is just along for the ride.

Pates Pottery collectors rejoice: this posey vase is in perfect condition and is for sale: $AUD75

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Depression glass

Depression glassCrown Crystal Glass Company depression glass
made in Australia 1920s-1935

The Crown Crystal Glass Co made pressed glass items from the early 20s to the mid 30s in Australia. Here we have a lovely trio of green depression glass- oval jam dish, art deco styled desert dish and an orange squeezer. I collected them one by one and waited until I had a trio to photograph.

Depression glass is very collectible and there are fakes and reproductions out there. How to tell if it’s authentic? Depression glass was made quickly and cheaply and was marketed to ‘housewives’ as everyday-use glass. Quite often you can see bubbles & imperfections in the glass, the raised seams where the piece came out of the mould, and its heavy- heavier than glass produced today. Typically there was no makers mark.

In Australia depression glass was only made in green and pink, whereas in the US and England other colours were made [variations on green and pink.] Australian glass tends to be quite plain- whereas in the US particularly many patterns were pressed into the glass and the rarer patterned depression glass pieces go for hundreds of dollars.

This set of Australian depression glass is in very good condition – still fit for purpose should you wish to squeeze the odd orange – just be sure to hand wash in mild soapy water.

For sale: $AUD135

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