Pudding bowls

Fowler Ware pudding bowls,
made in Australia 1940s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This image shows the range of colours and sizes the pudding bowls were made in – and other posts evidence the rest! [I have collected a number of Fowler Ware pudding bowls….] The bowls and are still fit for purpose : I received a lovely christmas pudding made in one of these bowls- and after eating the pudding – I got to keep the bowl!

The large crimson and medium grey bowl are for sale : $AUD25 & $AU15 [or $30 for the pair.]

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Hanstan mugs

Hanstan mugs, Australia, 1970sHanstan mugs
made in Australia, 1970s

Hanstan pottery was a collaboration between Hans Wright and Stan Burrage – hence Hanstan– that started in Victoria in 1962. The pottery continued to make domestic ware pottery well into the 1980s. All Hanstan pottery was hand-signed [in quite florrid, 70s style] on the base- as are these mugs.

Hanstan also made stoneware spice containers- with cork lids- I have featured some previously in the white/brown colourway.  These mugs are quite unusual since not many were made in the orange/brown glaze. [My gen y friend said they look like avocados…and- you know- he’s right!]

These [rare] mugs are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU45

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Pates table vases

Pates vases, 40s-50sPates vases
made in Sydney, Australia 1946-1958

I have waxed lyrical previously about my love of the ‘Australian’ green and brown hues of Sydney pottery of the post-war period…and here are some more examples from my collection. Pates pottery operated out of Belmore- an industrial suburb of inner-Sydney, from 1946 and only ceased production in 1990.

Here is a selection of Pates vases in brown/green hues; two ‘lotus’ vases and a ‘log’ vase. Like many Pates vases, these shapes came in a variety of colours to suit the late 40s, early 50s décor. I decided my personal collection would be these ‘Australian’ colours [reminiscent of the bushland] – rather than the baby blues and powder pink or pastel yellow tones; but have rather too many to use or display now.

This set of Pates vases is in excellent vintage condition, and is for sale: $AU65

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Aboriginal motif kitsch

50s Aboriginal motif s&p, jugAboriginal motif salt & pepper shaker sets, and small jug
made in Australia c.1950s

While none of these items has a maker’s mark, the salt and pepper shakers at the back are possibly by Terra Ceramics, and the round shakers to the left are possibly Florenz Pottery. The small jug is probably Studio Anna. All these potteries were making tourist and souvenir pottery by the 1950s, and these appropriated [and westernised] indigenous motifs were hugely popular. Post war arts and crafts saw a rise in the popularity of Australiana – replacing traditional English motifs with ‘Australian’ themes; invariably Aboriginal motif works were black, tan and white.

This group works well as a set, or could form the basis of a larger collection. The items on their own are very kitsch…but somehow when grouped the kitschness is subverted into a subtler aesthetic.

This set is for sale: $AU125

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Lyndale Moss Pottery

Lyndale Moss pottery, 1950sLyndale Moss pottery
made in Melbourne, Australia 1950s

It’s Australia Day! Not celebrated or acknowledged by all Australians- but – who could resist this Australiana?

These are Lyndale Moss gum-leaf vases, and a eucalypt vase. It’s the 50s, and nationalism is starting to become a cultural force. Art potteries everywhere are forgoing the English rose for Australian-themed flora. And producing vases in all manner of colours [to suit the 50s décor]: pink, blue, yellow, black, spotted and drip-glazed: but for my money, the lovely matt-white is the best.

Lyndale didn’t sign the pottery- they relied on semi-permanent stickers [in gilt writing, no less] to note the maker. It’s rare that these stickers survived from the 50s, so if you find one with the sticker in-tact- you are sitting on a gold mine.

Happy Australia Day! Wherever and however you celebrate; these vases are for sale: $AU45

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Australiana Kitchenalia [sold]

bakewells jug & bowl, fowler ware jugFowler Ware jugs & pudding basin
made in Australia 1940s

This set is a monochrome collection of Fowler Ware jugs and pudding bowl- in a creamy, off-white. Collecting in a single colour is quite dramatic, and these pieces look fantastic in a white or neutral toned kitchen. I was inspired by a friend who has about 15 off-white bowls sitting on the top of her kitchen cupboards- in that space below the ceiling.

These pieces are stoneware, and from the Fowler Ware ‘Utility’ range – perhaps off-white wasn’t as glamorous as the coloured pieces [see post below] and could be used every day.

The beauty of the off-white bowl is that any fruit/food/kitchen implement stored in them looks fantastic. And as mentioned in previous posts- the bowls are still great for…cooking puddings!

For sale: $AU80

Green spotty pottery [sold]

Green spotty pottery, 1950sGreen and white spots
made in Australia c 1950s

This is the third installment of my friend Maisie’s Australian spotty pottery collection- first was black & white spotty, then blue and white spotty- and now – green & white spotty. Maisie sure loved the spots!

This collection is a funky 50s shaped bowl with matching jug and spoon. The spots are raised areas of glaze rather than merely an applied shape in the glaze.

Like the previous spotted pottery- these pieces are unmarked. This isn’t unusual for 50s Australian pottery- and while literally thousands of spotty pieces were made it is increasingly difficult to find these pieces. The pieces are all in good condition with only minor crazing to the exterior. I have had great success reducing crazing on ceramic pieces by sitting them in a bleach solution overnight – very effective when the background is white or a light colour like these pieces.

This collection is for sale: $AUD65

Blue spotty pottery [sold]

50s blue spotted potteryBlue spotty ware
made in Australia 1950s

Today’s collection comes from a friend- who has been collecting 50s spotted ceramics since she was a design student in the 70s. No-one was collecting spotty things then- and she cleaned up! Now of course every one recognises 50s things as soon as a spot is sighted.

The shakers are in the classic ‘acorn’ shaping – and like the bowl, the spots are raised areas of glaze rather than merely an applied shape in the glaze.

Like the black and white spotted pottery- also collected by Maisy, and featured below -these pieces are unmarked. This isn’t unusual for 50s Australian pottery- and while literally thousands of spotty pieces were made it is increasingly difficult to find these pieces. The pieces are all in good condition without chips or cracks or crazing- which makes them even rarer.

Each piece is in great condition without cracks or chips [click on the image for a zoom image]- and are for sale: $AUD45

40s kitchenalia

Fowler Ware jug & Ibis condiment setFowler Ware jug, made in Australia 1940s
Ibis ‘lotus’ condiment set, made in Australia 1940s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls and jugs were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand. I have posted quite a few Fowler Ware jugs – this one is had that quintessential 40s rounded body shape, and is in a drip glazed green- rather than the more usual solid glaze colour.

Ibis bakelite is hard to come by: not a lot of it was made as the small factory in Melbourne only operated for a short period between the wars.

This is a condiment set, with stand; the salt and pepper shakers have been fashioned as stylised lotuses. The openings for the salt and pepper is a recessed screwed section hidden under the stand. [This set has now sold.]

The Fowler Ware jug is for sale: $AU45

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Merrrrrrrry Christmas!

Retro retail stand with Suzi Tyson angelsMerry Christmas!

To all my gallant and steadfast followers and readers….Merry Christmas! Have a lovely festive time and enjoy much retro!

[This is my partner’s Christmas ideal: a retro Christmas tree stand -from a long ago defunct shop- adorned with pottery angels by Australian artist Suzi Tyson, c. 1990s.]