50s Diana vases

Diana vases,
made in Australia 1950s

As you know, I collect Australian pottery made by Diana- the post-war pottery was situated very near where I now live in Sydney. I collect the ‘Australiana’ pottery in colours of eucalypt green and bark brown- but the same vase shape came in a multitude of colours to suit the changing interiors of post-war Australia.

Here are two posy vases- or ring vases- which display floating flowers [rather than stemmed flowers] and a small matching vase. The deep crimson and powder blue colours are SO 50s; but the geometric patterning on these vases harks back to the 20s and Art Deco. The same shaped vases were made well into the 70s, when they were handpainted [quite garishly, natch] with Australian flora.

Diana produced ‘art pottery’ from 1940 to 1975. The pottery is unique in that it only produced art and domestic pottery products, rather than having antecedents in industrial pottery. I have a number [she said, modestly] of Diana pieces featured on this blog; jugs, pudding bowls, ramekins, casserole dishes, platters, coffee pots…and vases.

This collection of vases is for sale: $AU75 [the small vase has original Diana sticker]

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Pudding bowls [sold]

Fowler Ware pudding bowls,
made in Australia 1940s

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

This image shows the range of colours and sizes the pudding bowls were made in – and other posts evidence the rest! [I have collected a number of Fowler Ware pudding bowls….] The bowls and are still fit for purpose : I received a lovely christmas pudding made in one of these bowls- and after eating the pudding – I got to keep the bowl!

The large crimson and medium grey bowl are for sale : $AUD25 & $AU15 [or $30 for the pair.]

Doggy bookends

ceramic dog bookends, Japan, 1950sCeramic dog bookends
made in Japan 1950s

These doggy bookends- cocker spaniels, I believe, were made in the 50s. They both have a large hole in the base- which I always believed was for glazing/firing purposes – but no- apparently this hole allows the bookends to be filled with sand, and then corked to seal. The sand allows the bookends to have a heavier mass, and so withstand the forces of all the books. I had no idea.

The book ends are shown here with our burgeoning Observer book collection – they are just the right scale for the books. I have not filled the bookends with sand – but leave that to the next owner.

The bookends would suit a reader with a library, or – a cocker spaniel enthusiast. The doggy bookends are for sale: $AUD80

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40s pudding bowls [sold]

Fowler Pudding BowlsFowler Ware pudding bowls
made in Australia, c.1940s

I have posted Fowler Ware pudding bowls before; I do love them [and not just because they are good for making christmas puddings!]- the colours are fantastic and they look great in the kitchen holding fruit, eggs and take-away menus.

A complete set of 5 pudding bowls were made to be ‘nested’ and were always different colours. The three on display here represent the middle three sizes: the smallest and the largest bowls are missing. All three bowls are stamped with Fowler Ware Australia – and the colours, though made in the 40s presaged the 50s.

Three assorted sized bowls: yellow, green, crimson.  For sale : $AUD60

Pates vases

Pates vasesPates vases
made in Sydney, 1950s

Continuing my love affair with crimson/green Pates vases [see post below, and a few more below that…] here is a fantastic handled ‘urn’ vase, a novelty ‘fish’ vase and a simpler ‘day’ vase.

Vases are a fantastic thing to collect since they look great massed together as sculptural objects, and then when needs must- they perform a great function of holding flowers. I find I always have just the right vase to hand to display both Australian native and exotic flowers.

All the vases are in excellent condition- and you’ll note the larger vase has its original Pates sticker- which of course makes it much more valuable. This set of vases is for sale: $AUD125

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Diana ring posy vases

Diana ring posy vasesDiana ring posy vases
made in Sydney, Australia c. 1950s

Posy vases were a big thing in the 50s…a vase just deep enough for a single, small flower to float in water, in a ring arrangement that made the posy self-supporting. I have used gum sprigs [with leaves, gum nuts and flowers] in these bowls and the result is quite spectacular.

The first two vases are oval in shape: the third is circular. All three have the beautiful pinks and crimsons so associated with the 50s_ and the middle vase has an incised flannel flower pattern [regular readers will recognise that pattern from a couple of previous posts.]

Regular readers will also be aware of my great love for all things Diana – especially the ‘Australiana’ green and brown coloured pottery. It is with some reluctance that I offer these beautiful vases for sale…I have retained the same shapes/patterns in the green and brown glaze in my collection, and so have to let these ones go.

The three vases are for sale: $AUD75

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Swinnertons ‘Moonglo’ dinner plates [sold]

moonglo dinner platesSwinnertons Nestor Vellum ‘Moonglo’ dinner plates
made in England, c.1950s

I recently posted some Nestor Vellum ‘Moonglo’ cups & saucers and side plates– the Moonglo refers to the beautiful 50s colours, but what does Nestor Vellum refer to? Hellkatdesigns [a fantastic blog out of Melbourne] noted that Nestor was a mythological Greek sage- I figured out that vellum is parchment…but that’s as far as we’ve got.

So- here’s seven beautiful Moonglo plates to go with the cup & saucers and side plates. I absolutely love the colours. It’s mix ‘n’ match at its best.

For sale: $AUD75

Martin Boyd condiment pottery

Martin Boyd condiment pottery
made in Sydney, Australia c.1950s

This collection of Martin Boyd showcases some of the pottery’s other well-known designs: to date on this blog I’ve only included the two-toned pottery pieces.

The two cream jugs that bookend the image illustrate the handpainted ‘Australiana’ themes that Boyd is famous for. The jug to the left sports a grass tree, and the jug on the extreme right shows a worker in a field of bamboo. Both jugs have the beautiful pink background which is so associated with Boyd pottery.

In the middle of the image is a crimson double cruet set with bamboo handle; the mustard pot is lidded. To the rear and front of the group are pieces with a ‘dot’ design – another classic popular in the 50s. The jug is the same pink colour as the other jugs, and the salt and pepper shakers are the same crimson as the cruet set.

All the pieces are in excellent condition, with the exception of the grass tree jug which has a small chip on the pouring lip. I debated whether to buy and show this piece, but the beautiful rendering of the grass tree won me over.

For sale: $AUD150

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