Christmas kitchen canisters

Kitchen canisters, 1960sKitchen canisters
made in Australia 1960s

I’ve posted an image of our kitchen previously: I have been collecting these glass canisters FOREVER. I like them because you can see what food stuff is contained within: and because they were made in the 50s the glass is thick and the seal is strong. These canisters can be repurposed to contain anything that needs an air-tight seal.

I also like the canisters because my partner’s family actually bought them – every Christmas- filled with sugared almonds or salted nuts. So she has an association with them too. Now our kitchen is replete with them.

The lids were made in bakelite up until the 50s – then – every colour of plastic lid was used. This is especially helpful now in the kitchen: as I associate flour with red, baking soda with yellow, sugar with green…

I have several here in Christmas colours. The glamour! The five canisters are for sale: $AU100

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A collection of 40s Australiana

Fowler Ware jug, tortoise shell knitting needles, Emu knitting pin gaugeFowler Ware jug
Tortoise Shell knitting needles
Emu knitting pin gauge, made in Australia 1940s

This collection was made in Australia in the 1940s.

Fowler Ware created industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney commencing in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their graduated pudding bowls and jugs were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand. Here we have a 2 pint jug in yellow: it is marked as such in relief on the base.

The vintage tortoise shell knitting needles are much prized by knitters and artists alike : very collectable. Knitters like them because they are super flexible and so easier to work with, and artists refashion the needles into art / jewellery : see Etsy and Pinterest for examples. Because the material is so pliable artists use hot water to mould the needles into new shapes/patterns. This collection has twenty pairs of needles, up to needle gauge 6mm, which was the largest gauge made in this material.

And the Emu gauge is a classic bell-shaped gauge: its anodised aluminium in a fantastic green colour. It’s different from previous bell gauges in having the gauge holes in the middle, rather than the on the edge of the bell – and includes a tiny 1mm diameter hole for a size 19 needle. The logo of the emu as a ball of wool, with needles for legs at the top of the bell is a classic!

All three items in this collections are for sale separately:
The Fowler Ware jug : $AU40
20 pairs tortoise shell needles: $AU200
Emu knitting gauge: $AU25

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Green & cream bakelite kitchenalia

Green & cream bakelite kitchenalia made in Australia, 1940sGreen bakelite kitchenalia
made in Australia 1940s

Here we have green & cream bakelite kitchenalia from the 40s – the bread board [with incised ‘BREAD’ script] was made by British Plastics, in Melbourne; the salt canister was made by Industrial Plastics in Adelaide, and the canisters are by Nally, in Sydney.

The large Flour canister houses nested canisters inside – each with that fantastic cursive script; they are ‘Sugar’ and ‘Coffee’. I have waxed lyrical about the olden days when coffee canisters were the smallest – and how nowadays they would be the largest. So, ok, won’t belabour the point.

The salt canister has overt deco styling, despite being made in the 40s – and it is in good vintage condition and ready to hang. The bread board has never been used, and so has no cuts or abrasions – and the Nally canisters- an incomplete set of five – are also in excellent vintage condition.

Unusually I am offering the three for sale separately: although of course if you’d like to purchase the lot we can negotiate a fair price>

The bread board is $AU30, the salt canister is $AU30 and the Nally canisters [3] are for sale: $AU95

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Bakelite picnic & measuring cups

Selex and Helix bakelite picnic and measuring cupsBakelite picnic and measuring cups
made by Sellex and Helix, in Australia c. 1940-1950

These bakelite pieces have retained their wonderful colour, and work beautifully as a set. The set of 5 nested picnic cups in green and the large red measuring cup have an ‘inverted beehive’ shape, and both were made by Sellex. The red measuring cup measures 1 cup on its upper rim, then ½, 1/3, and ¼ cups on the graduated rings of the ‘beehive’.

The set of blue measuring cups are by Helix, and measure ½, 1/3 and ¼ cups. I thought perhaps the larger 1 cup was missing from the set, but apparently Helix only ever made a set of three measuring cups, in this style. It was the 40s and bakelite was costly to produce- it was considered an extravagance to make a 1 cup measure when you had a perfectly good ½ cup measure that could be used twice!

I recently found another set of Helix graduated measuring cups in red- they fit right in with this colourful kitchenalia set of bakelite pieces.

This collection is for sale: $AU95 [and another set of red Helix measuring cups available upon request.]

Gayware

Gayware spice canistersGayware spice canisters
made by Gay Plastics, Sydney, Australia 1950-1965

This is a set of Gayware spice canisters: I have previously blogged about Gayware- the larger kitchen canisters and tea dispenser [see posts below– and ‘Sold’.] I just love Gayware – the name mostly.

In the 50s people cooked with Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Chives, Allspice, and Ginger. Hence CNCAG. I’m sure you could rearrange the initials to make a more interesting anagram.

In today’s society, you could use them for coffee [C], newguinea coffee [N], another coffee variety [C], andulsian coffee [A] and guam coffee [G]. It’s all about coffee. At least, that’s what I would do.

The spice canisters are all in good order- the lids fit well to provide a seal; they are ready for any spice/coffee that you care to store in them.

They are for sale: $AUD125

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Retro ringers

Smiths RingersRetro kitchen timers
Smiths Ringers, made in England, 1940s,1950s, 1960s

Perhaps I should have styled these three ‘ringers’ chronologically- as it is, the green ringer is bakelite and steel, with a glass cover- circa 1940, the middle ringer is the youngest- a mere slip of a thing from the 60s – brown coated metal, and the last, red ringer is all plastic- from the 1950s.

Each ringer is somewhat redolent of its age. I do like the fact that the 60s ringer is called ‘Ringer Girl’- if only the other two had similarly inspired names. All the ringers have different bell sounds- naturally- and due to their age and hard working life, are more suited as objects of beauty, rather than function. The green bakelite is a little faded, the brown metal is a little rusted in parts- as you’d expect from vintage items.

The ‘lemon’ tray lends a stylistic note to the image- but if you’d like to have it along with the ringers- let me know. This set is for sale: $AUD60

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40s Bakewells

Bakewells bowl and jugBakewells mixing bowl and jug
made in Sydney, Australia 1930s

Bakewells started production in 1884 and like so many potteries, moved from making industrial pieces [bricks and pipes] to domestic wares in the early part of the twentieth century. By the early 30s Bakewells was making pudding bowls and banded mixing bowls in multi colours- all to meet the insatiable demand of the new middle class.

Bakewells was in Bexley, in Sydney and is now very well known and very collectible. Particularly collectible are the banded bowls like this blue one- they can also be found in yellow, purple and green. The matching jug- with its 30s post-art-deco styling is made with the same off-white glaze. Perfect for the contemporary kitchen!- or the Bakewells enthusiast.

The bowl and jug are for sale: $125

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Fowler Ware [sold]

Fowler Ware bowl & jugFowler Ware mixing bowl & jug
made in Australia, c.1940s

Fowler Ware first began producing industrial pottery in Glebe, Sydney in the 1840s. After WWII, Fowler Ware moved to producing pottery for the domestic market : their pudding bowls were so popular that they opened a second pottery to cope with the demand.

Fowler Ware is now very collectible and becoming harder to obtain: particularly so the mixing bowls with pouring lip. The domestic ware was produced in a range of classic 40s colours: green, yellow, grey, crimson, blue and white. Here we have a large mixing bowl and matching jug in the pastel yellow. The two are a pair- both have matching incised rings around the base.

I’ve teamed the Fowler Ware pieces with a perspex board from an old reprographics factory – I like the framing qualities of the font board- as well as the yellow letters.

The mixing bowl & jug are for sale: $AUD75