Kathie Winkle #70sstyle

Kathie Winkle ‘Kimberley’
made in England 1973

I am a huge Kathie Winkle fan: she produced over one hundred patterns for Broadhurst between 1958 and 1975. And it seems I’m not the only one: recently Kathie re-released several of the more popular patterns [see her website.]

However, these new releases are not handpainted, don’t have wonky registration of the transfer patterns, and look too – new and perfect. I much prefer the originals, and take great satisfaction from collecting them in the ‘wild’. So far, I have: Corinth [1967] Calypso [1963] Newlyn [1963] Tashkent, Kontiki [1965] Renaissance, Electra, Rushstone [1965] Michelle [1968] – and now- Kimberley [1973.]

This is a place setting for one: large plate, side plate and cup and saucer. And it’s for sale. Start your Kathie Winkle collection today! My ideal would be to have a place setting in six different patterns- fabulous! $AU45

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Donald Clark placemats

'Cigarette' ashtray & Daniel Clark placeats‘Fish’ placemats by Donald Clark,
made in Australia 1960s

The Australian artist – cum graphic designer- Donald Clark is having a resurgence right now. The pattern on these linen placemats is [unsurprisingly] ‘Fish’ and the limes and greys and very funky 60s-ness reminded me of this 60s ashtray. There are four placemats in the set, all with Donald’s signature.

Yes- that’s an ironic 60s ashtray that features cigarettes on a painters easel. Surrounded by abstract art forms, in a funky 60s shape, that’s an astray that I can enjoy. [Plus it’s never been used and would make a great pin dish.]

As an ode to the funky 60s, this set is for sale: $60

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Vintage Australian linens

Upcycled cushions
made from vintage Australian linen

My partner recently found a batch of vintage Australian tea towels, all linen and all unused. I love the graphic qualities of the images- and the strong colours – and decided to make square cushion covers from them.

The backs of the cushions are either upcycled linen or new linen, in plain colours to suit the images. I salvaged the upcycled linen from 50s and 60s tablecloths- and finished the openings with vintage bindings. It was nice to be able to use some of my vintage sewing stash…so it can be considered less a collection and more a necessity!

The cushions are sized to take a 400 x 400mm insert [15.7 x 15.7 inches.] They are fully washable and would make a great gift- especially if the calendar date 1976 or 1985 has a particular association for someone. I have thirty cushions made- and they can be grouped in 2s or 4s- email me if you’d like to peruse the ‘collection’.

The cushion covers are for sale: $AUD35/pair

30s Mickey Mouse

1930s Mickey Mouse napkin ringMickey Mouse napkin ring
made in Japan 1930s

How fabulous is this hand-painted Mickey Mouse napkin ring? Here he is in his early Disney rendering- all rat-like but with his trademark big ears. Mickey first appeared in 1928 [in Steamboat Willie] and this napkin ring was made not soon after.

I found Mickey in a collector’s sale lot of napkin rings and bought the lot because Mickey was there. Mickey is in great condition with only a little wear to the hand-painting on his extremities- ears and nose. He is very collectible- as is any vintage Mickey Mouse item. Mickey’s from the 30s and 40s are now highly sought after.

Mickey is shown here with a bakelite spice canister and a sweet tin from the 30s…they were made in Australia but since Mickey is a universal icon, I don’t think that matters. Mickey is for sale: $AUD75

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Fat Lava

Scheurich pottery,
made in West Germany 1960-70s

I have come to embrace the ‘fat lava’ craze for West Germany pottery only recently. One thing that helped was seeing the pottery in its homeland when I visited Berlin- and another thing that has helped has been time; I grew up with this stuff and hated it as a youngster!

‘Fat lava’ refers to the glaze type which is typically chunky and classically 70s in form and colour. The pieces shown here are from our personal collection – we decided to collect in orange and red. There are a million varieties of these shapes in every conceivable colour variation…but due to popularity and [crazy collectors] they are becoming harder to find.

One of my favourite collectors is someone who has collected the one Scheurich shape and form – [it happens to be the middle of the red pieces shown here] and has over 70 varieties of it. They look fantastic displayed together – this is a case where more- IS more!

Myott #60sstyle

Myott ‘Camilla’ pottery
made in England, 1960s

Myott Pottery was established by two brothers, Ashley and Sydney Myott in 1898, in Staffordshire in England. The pottery continues today- although it has changed hands – and names- numerous times since.

Myott pottery is very collectable; especially art deco pieces from the turn of the century which now command hundreds of pounds. This work, ‘Camilla’ is ‘refined ironstone’ from the 60s. It’s starting to be collectable, due to the Myott name, and the general interest in 60s pottery [especially floral pottery.]

Camilla came in the two colourways shown: pink and yellow. The large oval platter in pink has a matching mug [not in image] and the boxed pin dishes [never used – ‘as new’] evidence the yellow colourway.

It’s not know where the name ‘Camilla’ came from: I thought [as did many collectors] that Camilla was a derivation of Camellia – which is one of the flowers of the motif. Maybe it’s just a woman’s name- maybe…it was named for the future Queen of England?

This collection is for sale: $AU55 [including coffee mug]

Australia in the #40s and #50s

Australian Souvenirware,
made in Czechoslovakia, England, Australia 1940-50s

A selection of hand-coloured, photographic transfer prints of various Australian cities and landmarks made in the 40s and 50s. What a great wall feature they’d make!

Featured herein are beaches, streets, bridge and bridge approaches and traffic bridges, parks, clocks, landmarks, harbours, town halls, parliament houses and rivers [and I quote] :

  • Harbour Beach, Manly
  • Prince Street, Grafton
  • Belmont, Lake Macquarie
  • Bridge Approach, Shoalhaven River from Showground, Nowra
  • Bridge, Shoalhaven River, Nowra
  • Traffic Bridge, Macksville
  • Machattie Park, Bathurst
  • Dr Evershed Memorial Clock, Bega NSW
  • Bottle Rock, Coonabarabran
  • Ulladulla Harbour, NSW
  • Town Hall, Rockhampton QLD
  • Perth, WA
  • Parliament House, Canberra
  • Murray River, Corowa.

Makers are all noted on the backstamps: Victoria, IBC, Royal Grafton Bone China, Royal Stafford Bone China, Westminster China [the last, weirdly from Australia.]

All fifteen plates are in great vintage condition and provide a snapshot of important landmarks in Australia, as judged by tourists in the 40s and 50s. Or – as I mentioned – massed together they would make a fantastic wall feature.

The souvenirware plates are for sale: $AU120

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An ode to 70s design

Fred Press cheeseboard & Bessemer piecesFred Press, American artist
Lionel Suttie, Australian industrial designer

Fred Press was an American artist, and from 1950 to the 1980s was the chief designer of Rubel & Co on NY’s Fifth Avenue. He set out to revolutionise giftware, bringing his artistic sensibilities to domestic ware. Here we see a cheese/fruit board, in the shape of an apple, with one of his iconic drawings reproduced on the ceramic tile. The tile itself was made in Japan and is set in American teak, and it is signed Fred Press.

Lionel Suttie was an Australian industrial designer, bought in to Bessemer to revolutionise the design of utility ware– butter dishes, sugar bowls and table ware. This was the first time mass produced melamine products were thought worthy of design – or that they could make could make a design statement. In this image- a russet brown lidded condiment bowl, an avocado cup and saucer and a yellow sugar bowl.

Altogether a fine homage to the 70s -and- 70s designers.

This set is for sale: $AUD105

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Dalmatian s&p

Dalmatian salt & pepper shakers
made in Japan, 1960s

These fabulous dalmatian shakers could well be modelled on Disney’s 101 Dalmatians characters- but aren’t marked as such. The manufacture place and time is right, but they weren’t made under license to Disney [or at least there is no space on the base to note this.] Either way- they were probably inspired by the popularity of the film- and are super cute. Just look at that wink!

Salt and Pepper collection is growing as a hobby- they are small so don’t take up much space, and have been made since the mid Nineteenth Century. America has several museums devoted to salt and pepper shakers.

This would be a good way to start your own collection: there is a bit of wear to one dalmatians red collar, but otherwise they are in good vintage condition. They are for sale: $AU15

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Blue Moon

Poole Blue Moon tea cups,
made in England 1960-1975

Poole is a very well known pottery, which started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

These tea cups – very modern in shape and sans handle – are part of the Cameo range. The colour is ‘Blue Moon’ –a deep blue exterior, with a slightly off-white interior [pure white would be too stark…this off-white is just right.] The set of eight tea cups and saucers have the traditional mid-century Poole mark on each piece.

The cups don’t hold much tea – not that I have used them as such – the lovely colour and repetition of form has had them serve a purely decorative function. But they would make for a lovely tea party.

For sale: $AUD145
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