70s Golden Glory

Johnson ‘Golden Glory’ teacups
made in Australia 1976

The back stamp of these 70s tea cups is Johnson OF Australia – [reminds me of Lawrence OF Arabia!] Johnson Bros [Australia] produced transfer printed stoneware crockery marketed as “tough, utilitarian ware” – which is why these teacups are looking so fresh and unblemished today. Also- never been out of the box.

Johnson Bros [Australia] was a division of Johnson Brothers England- at the time one of the largest domestic pottery producers in the world. This design is ‘Golden Glory’- which, double entendre aside, is a selection of lovely golden Australian flowers. This pattern was collected and added to the Powerhouse collection by a Melbourne artist -John Hind.

I have recently started to embrace the 70s – and Australiana from the 70s; and now I have an Instagram account, I have been seeing much 70s Australiana – and Johnsons ceramics are much celebrated. There is one fantastic site where Johnson pieces are cut and sanded to make upcycled jewellery: rings and necklaces. It’s a lovely celebration of 70s iconography and the ‘tough, utilitarian ware’ that the Johnson Bros never imagined.

This boxed set of four teacups and saucers is for sale: $AU45 Buy now for Christmas!

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Hanstan coffee pot

Hanstan coffee pot & mugs
made in Australia, 1970s

Hanstan pottery was a collaboration between Hans Wright and Stan Burrage – hence Hanstan- that started in Victoria in 1962. The pottery continued to make domestic ware pottery well into the 1980s. Hanstan collectors will know that the pottery is always two-tone: either matt white and mission brown, or 70s orange and misson brown. The brown part of the pottery is rough glazed to contrast with the smooth slip glaze of the other colour.

The coffee pot, collectors will also know – is now quite rare and hard to find. I have had the mugs and the matching sugar bowl for some time, and the coffee pot, completing the set, has only just been found. All pieces are in excellent vintage condition; the coffee pot is completely unstained and looks like it’s never been used.

I also have examples of Hanstan white/brown pottery- spice jars and a salt pig – elsewhere on this blog.

The Hanstan coffee set is for sale: $AU125

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70s Australiana

Crystal Craft trivet, made in Australia 1970s
Wiltshire ‘Vogue’ cutlery, made in Australia 1970s

Crystal Craft has become uber trendy for collectors: it is a resin-covered fabric that originated in Queensland in the 70s. This is a super 70s trivet- just look at the forms and colours! And it is great that the piece has it’s original sticker on the base.

The ‘Vogue’ cutlery was designed for Wiltshire by Stuart Devlin- famous for his other work designing the images on Australian coins [all native fauna & flora.] This was his day job – but once those coins were minted I think he gave up his day job! The cutlery are ‘new in box’ never opened or used, and in great condition.

I styled these two items together – I love the 70s colours! – but am happy to sell them separately: $AU35 each.

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Upcycled tin clock [sold]

Upcycled clock,
Biscuit tin, made in Australia 1970s

An upcycled biscuit tin clock, featuring corgi puppies- not upcycled by me but by a friend. Such a great idea! the lid comes off to reveal the quartz clock movement, which takes an AA battery. A small hole drilled in the back of the tin allows the clock to be hung. Viola! vintage tin upcycled to functional timepiece.

The tin is 200mm x 120mm, with a depth of 80mm- which means that doggy figurine shown next to the clock, could quite easy model on top of the clock, once hung.

The clock will appeal to vintage lovers – and corgi puppy admirers. It is for sale: $AU18

Johnson OF Australia

Johnson Bros [Aust] dinner plates, 1975Johnson OF Australia dinner plates
made in Queensland, Australia 1975

The back stamp of these 70s plates is Johnson OF Australia – [reminds me of Lawrence OF Arabia!] Johnson Bros [Australia] produced transfer printed stoneware crockery marketed as “tough, utilitarian ware” – which is why these plates are looking so fresh and unblemished today.

Johnson Bros [Australia] was a division of Johnson Brothers England- at the time one of the largest domestic pottery producers in the world. This design wasn’t given a name or a pattern number, but the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney has a record of the design: it is described as a “complex radial design with central sunflower”. The plate was collected and added to the Powerhouse collection by a Melbourne artist John Hind.

I have recently started to embrace the 70s – and Australiana from the 70s; and now I have an Instagram account, I have been seeing much 70s Australiana – and Johnson’s plates are much celebrated. There is one fantastic site where Johnson pieces are cut and sanded to make upcycled jewellery: rings and necklaces. It’s a lovely celebration of 70s iconography and the ‘tough, utilitarian ware’ that the Johnson Bros never imagined.

These two dinner plates are for sale: $AU40

Skippy [sold]

retro kangaroo wall plate & figurineKangaroo & Joey ceramic wall plate, made in Australia c. 1960
Kangaroo figurine, made in Australia c. 1970

A study of two kangaroos- a decade apart- but what a contrast.

The 60s wall plate- made with perforations to the back so it can be hung- features a fairly accurately realised kangaroo and joey in an abstracted environment. So far, so 60s. The 70s figurine is highly stylised- with enlarged feet and tail having a functional purpose- keeping Skippy stable.

I am absolutely partial to the archetypal fauna of Australia- kangaroo, koala, kookaburra. I know many people who limit their collections to just the one theme, maker, material or decade- but I don’t have that discipline. Kangaroo collectors, lovers and aficionados, see countless examples in blog posts below.

Kangaroo collectors should love this little lot, which is for sale: $AUD40