Hawaii 5-0!

Hawaii souvenir wall plaque
made in Japan, 1960s

Careening right back into kitsch territory, this is a Hawaiian souvenir from the 60s- made in Japan! It’s a wall plaque- how good would this look hanging in a contemporary interior? Very, very good!

The plaque is hand painted, and features a dancing hula girl, Hawaiian beachscape, complete with flowers, palm tree and background volcano; all framed in a pineapple. Because nothing says Hawaii like a pineapple!

The plaque is in excellent vintage condition and ready to hang. It’s for sale: $AU15

60s perpetual calendar

60s perpetual calendarPerpetual calendar
made in Queensland, Australia c 1960s

Ah, the sixties. When no subject was too prosaic to provide a backdrop for a perpetual calendar. The Sunshine Plantation grew and continues to grow pineapples – it’s on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland [I visited as a youngster.]

The pineapple is traditionally a symbol of hospitality – or wealth. In Australia it comes in cans and can be found on pizzas and Big Macs. But recently the humble pineapple has become somewhat of a style icon, adorning everything in interiors from large format pictures to timber-turned bedposts. So I present to you- a perpetual calendar and two toothpick holders from the 60s. And a real pineapple for comparison purposes.

Add to your burgeoning pineapple collection, or begin one with these beauties. Every desk needs a perpetual calendar- and every office a toothpick holder upcycled to thumb-drive storage. You just can’t have too many pineapples!

The perpetual calendar is for sale: $AUD45 [toss in the two toothpick holders for free.]

Buy Now

60s perpetual calendar

Pineapple perpetual calendarPerpetual calendar
made in Hong Kong, 1960s

Ah, the sixties. When no subject was too prosaic to provide a backdrop for a perpetual calendar. The Sunshine Plantation grew and continues to grow pineapples – a symbol of hospitality for some, and of wealth for others.

Recently the humble pineapple has become somewhat of a style icon, adorning everything in interiors from large format pictures to timber-turned bedposts. So I present to you- a perpetual calendar and two toothpick holders from the 60s. And a real pineapple for comparison purposes.

Add to your burgeoning pineapple collection, or begin one with these beauties. Every desk needs a perpetual calendar- and every office a toothpick holder converted to thumb-drive storage. You just can’t have too many pineapples!

The perpetual calendar is for sale: $AUD45 [toss in the two toothpick holders for free.]

Buy Now

60s anodised aluminium

60s anodised aluminium60s anodised aluminium

This shiny, shiny collection features anodised aluminium- three cake /jelly moulds made in Hong Kong and a teapot by Towerbrite made in Australia. Anoidised aluminium was developed in the 1920s and used for industrial products – but it really took off in domestic wares in the 60s thanks to the moon landing and all things spacey.

These kitchen moulds were made in kitschy shapes – ostensibly for terrines but invariably used for cakes, blancmanges and jellies. Who doesn’t remember a large pineapple shaped jelly [red, with real pineapple chunks floating in it] at their sixth birthday party? When not in use, the moulds have handy little handles so they can hang up and add glamour to any kitchen.

The two larger moulds [salmon and pineapple] are 4 cup capacity, and the smaller classic christmas cake-shaped mould is 2 cups. Note the copper and gold tones- that’s where that glamour comes in- the moulds have never been used and are in pristine condition. Similarly the teapot is unstained and unused.

These pieces will add bling to any situation- and are for sale: $AUD85

Buy Now