Children’s figurine #50s style

Lustreware duck figurine, 1950sLustreware duck
made in Japan, 1950s

Following the fantastic lustreware duck jug recently posted; here is another lustreware duck. This is also from the 1950s- this being a dressed duck, with waistcoat and topcoat – but – strangely no wings [seem to be demurely tucked under those clothes.] The duck would have been bought for a children’s room; these anthropomorphic animals were very popular as gifts for children in the 50s and 60s.

The lustreware is seen on the topcoat, and as with the jug, all this was hand-painted. I’ve teamed the duck figurine- which is quite large- 170mm tall- with a little duck cup orphaned from a children’s tea set, also made in Japan at around the same time. Though just how he will pick up that cup is anyone’s guess!

The duck figurine is for sale: $AU35

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Lusterware side plates

Lustreware side plates [Japan, 1950s]Lusterware harlequin plates,
made in Japan, 1950s

Here is a collection from a friend: lusterware plates, made in Japan in the 50s. My friend inherited them from her parents to whom they were given as a wedding gift. As is the wont of parents, especially parents in Australia in the 50s- the plates were never used, as they were “too good”.

The plates were too good to be used! They were passed down to my friend who has a much more modern sensibility than me [and obviously, her parents] – she didn’t exactly recoil when you showed me the plates, but she thought I might have more love for them than she did. By love I understood her to mean ‘space’ and ‘tolerance of lusterware’. Luckily, I do have both.

I love lusterware, especially Japan 50s lusterware- and I love the whole ‘harlequin’ ideal: each plate is a different colour, but they all have the same neat gilt edge- and are clearly a set. Sure, lusterware is kitschy : but it is also of its time: it represents newly glazing techniques and evokes the metallic & mechanistic ideals of the space age.

This set of six side plates is for sale: $AU60

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Children’s figurine #50s style

Lustreware duck figurine, 1950sLustreware duck
made in Japan, 1950s

Following the fantastic lustreware duck jug recently posted; here is another lustreware duck. This is also from the 1950s- this being a dressed duck, with waistcoat and topcoat – but – strangely no wings [seem to be demurely tucked under those clothes.] The duck would have been bought for a children’s room; these anthropomorphic animals were very popular as gifts for children in the 50s and 60s.

The lustreware is seen on the topcoat, and as with the jug, all this was hand-painted. I’ve teamed the duck figurine- which is quite large- 170mm tall- with a little duck cup orphaned from a children’s tea set, also made in Japan at around the same time. Though just how he will pick up that cup is anyone’s guess!

The duck figurine is for sale: $AU35

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Lustreware jug

Lustreware duck jugLustreware duck jug
made in Japan 1950s

I think this duck jug comes from part of a children’s tea set; but I could be wrong. It is quite large for a tea set- the size of an ordinary jug; but the styling and whimsy of the duck reminds me of a children’s play set.

The jug has the ‘lustreware’ glazing so typical of the 40s – the shiny, gold glaze that makes up the duck’s body- and gives it a ‘kitschiness’ to the modern eye. I am a big fan of lustreware – and kitsch, for that matter – so I love this jug.

I haven’t been able to find a maker for the jug; it’s just marked ‘Japan’ on the base. It is in good vintage condition and is for sale: $AU35. Buy now for Christmas!

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Lustreware

Pates lustreware platterPates lusterware plate
made in Sydney, Australia c. 1950s

Ah lusterware! Loved by me and…hardly anyone else –and….loathed by many. But it was such a quintessential expression of the 50s – and a world-wide phenomenon – in that it linked ideas of ‘modernity’ with ‘metal’ or machinery. In short, lustreware was all about the space-race.

Lustreware is a metallic glaze produced by using metal oxides in an overglaze, placed over an initial colour and re-fired in a kiln. Lustreware’s shininess and metallic-ness was very revolutionary in the 50s – so used to pastel pink and baby blues. It was all about the new ‘machine’ era.

This swan/peacock platter, though- is familiar in form. Pates produced this piece through the 40s in rather sedate glazed colours and then updated it using lusterware glazes in the 50s. The Pates catalogue actually describes this as a swan/peacock platter, as if it is an amalgam of the two. Either way, the bird’s head is the platter handle and the lusterware is – awesome!

The lusterware platter is for sale: $AUD75

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Lustreware vases [sold]

Mingay, Pates, Diana, Casey Ware, made in Australia c.1950s

Yes, okay, lustreware is an acquired taste. Both my photographer and my partner cringed when I bought this group out- they are both dear to me but they will not even pretend to care for the lustreware! For me, the vases are a quintessential expression of the 50s – lustreware was a world-wide phenomenon – in the linking of ideas of ‘modernity’ with ‘metal’ or machinery. The vases themselves might be florid – but the metal glaze was all about the machine age.

The metallic glaze was produced by using metal oxides in an overglaze, placed over the initial colour and re-fired in the kiln. It seems as if all the post-war potteries in Sydney produced lustreware; and for good measure, the same pieces can also be found in ordinary glazes. These vases were given a special stamped code to distinguish them from their non-lustreware cousins.

From the left to the right of the image:
Mingay [stamped 235 on base]
Pates [V8]
Pates [V10]
Diana [V46]
and two examples of Casey Ware [not marked, but I have seen these two vases in a non-lustreware finish.]

The small Pates [V8] vase has a repair on its base; all the other vases are in tip-top lustrey condition.       For sale: $AUD105

Miscellaneous green pottery [sold]

Diana vase, Beswick jugMiscellaneous green pottery
Beswick Ware & English Ware, made in England, c.1940s, and Diana, made in Australia, c.1950s

The Beswick Ware jug to the top left of the image is a late example of art deco pottery. It is not marked as Beswick but it is a known example of this pottery maker. The square serving bowl in the foreground is marked –  L & S Sons Ltd, Hanley English Ware. A great deal of English Ware in this series had a raised floral design, and it came in muted yellows or greens, like this bowl.

The oval vase with embossed flower is by Diana,  is marked V153 [Vase # 153] and it’s typically 50s with its pastel colours and contrasting ‘throat’ colour. The oval plate next to it is also by Diana, is lustreware, and it’s marked S83 [Serving plate #83.]

The four pieces have each come from other parts of my collection – on occasion I like to style pottery based on form, or size, or as in this case- colour.    For sale: $AUD85