Terra Ceramics lazy susan

Terra Ceramics ‘Daisy’ lazy susan
made in Australia, c.1965

The ubiquitous daisy- symbol of the 60s- is stylised and showcased on these Terra Ceramics pieces. Terra Ceramics was proudly Australian, and they have imbued their daisies with the colours of the bush-  olive greens, tans and browns. This set is a lazy susan: four segmented ceramic pieces lift out from around the central circular piece, with the whole lot on a burnished anodised aluminium tray. Which turns around – hence ‘lazy susan’.

The pieces are stamped “Terra Ceramics Australia, Terama hand painted”. It’s now unusual to find hand painted ceramics- and if you look at the five individual pieces you can see subtle differences in the hand-painters work.

I have also collected a matching Daisy ramekin, and Daisy salt and pepper shakers. The Daisy collection continues!

The lazy susan is in excellent vintage condition and is for sale: $AU75

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Crystal Craft! [sold]

Crystal Craft ‘Daisy’ trivet and coasters
made in Australia 1960s

Crystal Craft! I have watched in astonishment as Crystal Craft has become incredibly collectible. Think the wired daisies with faces that proliferated in the 70s, and those resin daisy coasters with broad smiles in bright colours.

This is a collection of Crystal Craft ‘Daisy’- resin trivet and matching coasters. If you, or anyone you know has a Crystal Craft addiction – then – call a help line, or buy them this collection.

This collection was made in Australia – it would make a great Christmas present. For sale: $AU65

60s daisies [sold]

Crown Lynn 'Daisy' bowlsCrown Lynn ‘Daisy’ bowls
made in New Zealand, 1960s

Crown Lynn produced pottery in New Zealand from 1854-1989. By the 1960s Crown Lynn was producing export quality pottery with very funky 60s designs- of which this set ‘Daisy’ with those quintessential 60s flowers- was part. Crown Lynn was exported worldwide – which is why I frequently hear from people living in America who grew up with Crown Lynn crockery – and consequently it is now very collectible.

In researching the pattern I found the ‘Daisy’ pattern is quite rare- and increasingly hard to find. It was produced in only two colours- this rusty-orange and a pale yellow. The bowls are both in good vintage condition with only minor evidence of use in the past fifty years.

The bowls are for sale: $25

Kelston Springtime

Kelston 'Springtime' 60sKelston ‘Springtime’ breakfast set
made in New Zealand, 1965

Kelston is part of Crown Lynn- which produced pottery in New Zealand from 1854-1989. By the 1960s Crown Lynn was producing export quality pottery with very funky 60s designs- of which this set ‘Springtime’ with those quintessential 60s daisies- was part. Crown Lynn and Kelston ceramics are now also very collectible.

This is a breakfast/dinner set for two: large plates, medium plates & side plates with cereal/desert bowls. So versatile! Springtime came in two colours- this lovely soft grey and a rather harsh dark brown. You can guess which I prefer.

Like many partial sets I collect, I prefer a small portion rather than the whole. A whole dinner service of Springtime would be so overwhelming as to be boring; BUT as less is more, this little part of the set is really lovely.

The breakfast/dinner set is for sale: $AUD125

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1950s collectible tennis racquets

Collectible tennis racquetsSpalding “Gonzales” signature, made in Belgium 1950s
Stellar “Classic”, made in USA 1950s

Never having played a game in my life, I was gifted the beautiful timber racquet on the right [in the 1950s cross-stitched daisy cover] – by someone who played a great deal. In the 50s and 60s. I was so taken by the hand-made cover [I found a copy of the original pattern on-line] which has a large metal zip opening and a deep red vinyl backing. The racquet and cover have been carefully conserved between their playing life and being gifted to me. I find the whole thing beautiful.

The racquet on the left- in its wonderful original frame press, is a Spalding ‘Gonzales’ signature racquet. There’s a terrific picture of a smiling Gonzales on both sides of the racquet to prove the fact. Spalding racquets were imported into Australia from the 1920s; this one is made from white ash timber. The frame press is also imported: it is marked:

W. METCALFE
THE SPORTS DEPOT
RICHMOND & CATTERICK CAMP YORKSHIRE

Given all this, I still love the hand-stichted daisy racquet cover the most; despite having learnt a great deal from researching www.tennishistory.com.au.

The two racquets are for sale: $AUD80

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