Krups kitchen scales

Krups kitchen scales
made in Germany c.1954

I have a rather large collection of retro scales. So far I have posted Australian scales [Salter -50s and Persinware-60s] but the collection also includes these lovely metal German scales. Scales are both functional and beautiful – as long as the measuring bowl is intact [and one must make sure it’s the original bowl as well.]

These scales weigh items up to 25 lbs [approx. 11.5kg] in 2 ounce increments. The scales are completely made of metal- bowl included, and they are original – not reproduction- scales, in that the scale is imperial only. Kitchen scales that feature both imperial and metric scales were made post 1972 and are considered reproduction.

The scales show a little bit of wear and tear from a life of service in a kitchen, but there is no corrosion or deterioration of the material and the weight measure is accurate. As is typical, there is an adjustment knob at the rear to allow one to correct for the weight of the bowl itself.

Four lemons and a lime weight 1lb 7oz. The duck is just along for the ride.  For sale: $AUD75

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Oak bookends

Oak bookends, Australian 1940sOak bookends
made in Australia, 1940s

A lovely pair of oak bookends, lined with green felt – for those of us who still read/collect/store books. The bookends are solid timber, made in the 40s from English Oak grown in Australia.

The timber bookends, though made in the 40s presage the modernist 50s whilst harking back to art deco of the 20s. They are a bit of an amalgam – but then so is harvesting an English Oak for an Australian bookend. If these were made today, there is any number of Australian hardwoods that could have been used.

I have styled the bookends with a small sample of our Observer book collection. Observer books are quite collectible; there is one hundred in the series starting with ‘British Birds’ in 1937 [no 1] and finishing with ‘Wayside and Woodland’, 2003 [no 100.]. They are pocket-sized field-research books and naturally to have all 100 would be a collectors dream.

The oak bookends are for sale: $AUD80

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Butterscotch bakelite

Alton butterscotch bakelite utensilsAlton utensils
made in Bankstown, Sydney Australia 1940s

This collection features butterscotch bakelite- very collectable; with silver plate [EPSP A1] – which is inscribed on each piece. EPSP stands for ‘electro-plated silver plate’, and the A1 indicates that this is the best silver plate. Enough said!

Alton made cutlery from its factory in Bankstown from the late 1890s until the 1950s. With the demise of large cutlery settings [consisting of forty or fifty pieces] which were purchased as wedding gifts in the 50s for more practical utensils – like Splayds, also a Sydney invention, the factory closed.

From left to right we have: a pair of salad servers, a fish knife and a teaspoon. All relics from one of those large cutlery sets – but all in pristine vintage condition; silver plate is intact and the butterscotch bakelite handles are entire, with no chips or fading.

The utensils are shown on a blue bakelite Sellex plate, also made in Sydney in the 40s. It showcases the butterscotch handles beautifully.

This collection is for sale: $AU75

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TAA- the friendly way [sold]

TAA flight food containersTAA inflight food boxes
made in Australia 1960s

TAA – Trans Australian Airlines; who doesn’t remember ‘Up, Up and Away with TAA…..” was an Australian domestic airline operating between 1946 and 1996. These two melamine inflight food boxes were made exclusively for TAA- the baby blue colour being the branded colour for the airline. The boxes are in excellent condition which is good news for the airline paraphernalia collectors out there.

I have previously posted TAA inflight boxes- a pair of square boxes- these are the accompanying rectangular-shaped boxes. They are marked underneath: ‘TAA B6-1-7 74 Melmac’. The Nylex Melmac Corporation started production in the mid-60s in Melbourne and TAA was one of their biggest customers.

The boxes are for sale : $AUD25

Oak bookends

Oak bookends, Australian 1940sOak bookends
made in Australia, 1940s

A lovely pair of oak bookends, lined with green felt – for those of us who still read/collect/store books. The bookends are solid timber, made in the 40s from English Oak grown in Australia.

The timber bookends, though made in the 40s presage the modernist 50s whilst harking back to art deco of the 20s. They are a bit of an amalgam – but then so is harvesting an English Oak for an Australian bookend. If these were made today, there is any number of Australian hardwoods that could have been used.

I have styled the bookends with a small sample of our Observer book collection. Observer books are quite collectible; there is one hundred in the series starting with ‘British Birds’ in 1937 [no 1] and finishing with ‘Wayside and Woodland’, 2003 [no 100.]. They are pocket-sized field-research books and naturally to have all 100 would be a collectors dream.

The oak bookends are for sale: $AUD80

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Totally green 70s

Totally green 70s!Harrods glass plate, made in London c1970s
Anchor Hocking ‘Aztec’ design bowl, made in USA c1970s
Green ceramic cat figurine, made in Japan c1970s

All from the 70s and all a lovely green colour….yet all from different countries of origin. I have used the ‘Helvetica Medium’ reprographics board behind to provide a context for the three pieces.

A few of my last posts have used this ‘reprographic’ device. I love graphics, and when I found a whole stack of old font boards from a reprographics place going out of business, I snapped them up. The font boards are various coloured perspex backgrounds with a variety of coloured fonts – here we have black and white, Helvetica Medium. Because they are perspex, the boards would make fantastic light boxes or light displays.

That is my intention, should I find the time/where-with-all to do so. My collection is bourgeoning with so many ideas, projects and could-possibilities. But the could-possibilities are what keep me working at the day job- their time will come [and by god what antiques will they be by then?]

In the meantime, this collection is for sale; $AUD95 – the dish, the bowl, the cat.

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Krups kitchen scales

Krups kitchen scales
made in Germany c.1954

I have a rather large collection of retro scales. So far I have posted Australian scales [Salter -50s and Persinware-60s] but the collection also includes these lovely metal German scales. Scales are both functional and beautiful – as long as the measuring bowl is intact [and one must make sure it’s the original bowl as well.]

These scales weigh items up to 25 lbs [approx. 11.5kg] in 2 ounce increments. The scales are completely made of metal- bowl included, and as noted before on this blog, they are original – not reproduction- scales, in that the scale is imperial only. Kitchen scales that feature both imperial and metric scales were made post 1972 and are considered reproduction.

The scales show a little bit of wear and tear from a life of service in a kitchen, but there is no corrosion or deterioration of the material and the weight measure is accurate. As is typical, there is an adjustment knob at the rear to allow one to correct for the weight of the bowl itself.

Four lemons and a lime weight 1lb 7oz. The duck is just along for the ride.  For sale: $AUD75

Martin Boyd ramekins

Martin Boyd ramekins
made in Australia 1957

The Boyds are a famous Australian family of artists. Martin Boyd pottery started in Cremorne, Sydney in 1946- but Martin doesn’t exist, instead it was Guy [Martin] Boyd who was the chief ceramicist. The pottery was in operation from 1946-1964, with 1957-58 being the peak production period.

All Martin Boyd pottery is made [and signed] by hand so there is a slight variation between any piece in a set. The pottery is instantly recognisable from the edge band of unglazed pottery that always separates the two toned pieces. The colours are quintessentially 50s.

This set of eight ramekins is in excellent condition – it has never been used. The person I bought the set from told me they were her mother’s who bought them new in 1957. She decided they were too lovely to ever be used for such a prosaic purpose as soup- and put them on display.   For sale: $AUD255

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