60s kitschiness [is my kinda kitschiness]

60s kitschinessMelbourne tray, made in Hong Kong, 1960s
Hornsea sugar bowl, made in England, 1960s
Diana ramekins, made in Australia, 1960s.

An ode to 60s kitschiness – a bar tray featuring the beautiful city of Melbourne in the 60s- terrible image, much touched-up and with an explanatory label; a green ‘Heirloom’ sugar bowl, stoneware designed and produced by John Clappison in 1966 for Hornsea; and a pair of Diana ramekins, made in Marrickville, Sydney in the late 60s.

A range of 60s aesthetics: the tacky, the patterned and the late-modernist. All now very desirable and collectable. People collect bar-themed paraphenalia [‘barphenalia’] – Hornsea is oh-so collectable now, and Diana pottery [and ramekins especially] is becoming very desirable.

All these items are in good vintage condition, and are for sale: Melbourne bar tray: $AU20, Hornsea Heirloom sugar bowl: $AU25, and the Diana ramekins: $AU20.

Swinging 60s

Arabia ‘Kosmos’ espresso cups
Broadhurst Kathie Winkle ‘Calypso’ platter
made in Finland, England 1960s

Arabia pottery is uber collectble right now: here we have Kosmos, designed by Gunvor Olin-Gronquist [or GOG, as noted on the backstamp.] Kosmos dinner service sets were made between 1962 and 1976; these are espresso cups, for that perfect morning cuppa.

Also featuring in the image- Kathie Winkle for Broadhurst pottery- a ‘Calypso’ platter. This was made in 1963; Kathie Winkle was so prolific in producing different designs [over one hundred] in the 60s that each design was made for less than a year. The transfer stencil outline has been hand-painted, and then over-glazed, so no two pieces are exactly the same.

The Arabia cups are for sale: $AU55/pair, as is the Kathie Winkle platter: $AU35. A fabulous ode to the 60s!

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Upcycled toothpick holder

Toothpick holder, and Tasmanian pins
made in Australia, 1960s

Don’t you love a good toothpick holder? Obviously no one uses toothpicks any more- but they make such a good vintage receptacle for pins, hatpins, badges- anything on a stick!

This is a stylised bird toothpick holder that I found in Tasmania. Elsewhere on that same trip I found these fantastic Tasmanian pins- and so put two and two together.

I would love to see this birdy put to use displaying hat pins- so collectable right now. The holder is in terrific vintage condition, never having actually held anything before today- so would make a great receptacle for your pin collection. And- if you are into vintage/Tasmanian pins- so much the better!

This guy holds twelve pins: and is for sale: $AU25 [including pins]

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Cluedo

Waddington’s Cluedo, 1965 edition
made in England

Cluedo – the game- was first released in 1949 and some eight editions later, the last game edition was released in 1992. The 1949 ‘first edition’ games are now highly sought after.

This is a second edition game- made in 1965. It has the ‘magic’ re-useable detective notes; where players can make notations during a game, and then erase afterwards by pulling up the plastic sheet. Thereafter, detective notes came in the form of printed pads- not nearly as fun and much more prosaic!

Not much else changed – the English country house “Tudor Mansion” remained the same in all editions- it is based on a house in Hampshire built in 1926. Although the secret passageway between each rooms is probably a fabrication. And the murderer is always Colonel Mustard, with the candlestick, in the conservatory.

This 1965 edition is entire, in excellent vintage condition, with some minor damage to the box cover – and ready to play. For sale: $AU45

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Coffee collection

Ceramic coffee canister
made in Japan, 1960s

Further to my life-long quest to collect every known coffee canister – here is one posing as a coffee house. I’ve styled it with a Nally plastic coffee canister – Australian – of the same vintage. It’s interesting [to me anyway] that coffee wasn’t a big deal in the 60s – so that the canisters were smaller usually than tea- the bigger sized canisters in nested sets always belonged to sugar, rice and flour. Nowadays- I expect- sugar would be the smallest canister and coffee the largest!

Anyhoo- I like the idea of putting all my various single origin and coffee blends in different, miss-matched vintage coffee canisters. So far, all canisters- both plastic and ceramic- are roughly the same size – and just so happen to fit a bag of 250g coffee. So maybe those 60s canister makers did know what they were doing!

The ceramic ‘coffee house’ canister is in excellent vintage condition, and is for sale; $AU25

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Black and white- and plastic chrome

Breakfast set,
made in Hong Kong, 1960s

This is an- as new- never been used- breakfast set; two eggcups and salt and pepper shakers. They are made in state-of-the-art plastics; you’ll note the ‘plastic’ chrome feet which were revolutionary in the 60s!

Plastics used for everyday kitchenware was also revolutionary- the space race bought more than just lustreware to the ceramic industry. This set of four was sold to the restaurant industry; the black and white colourings evoked the checkerboard tiles of every diner and milk bar in the western world.

The pieces haven’t been used, and so are in pristine condition- just ready for your use in the 21st Century.  They are for sale: $AU25

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Swinging 60s

Arabia ‘Kosmos’ espresso cups
Broadhurst Kathie Winkle ‘Calypso’ platter
made in Finland, England 1960s

Arabia pottery is uber collectble right now: here we have Kosmos, designed by Gunvor Olin-Gronquist [or GOG, as noted on the backstamp.] Kosmos dinner service sets were made between 1962 and 1976; these are espresso cups, for that perfect morning cuppa.

Also featuring in the image- Kathie Winkle for Broadhurst pottery- a ‘Calypso’ platter. This was made in 1963; Kathie Winkle was so prolific in producing different designs [over one hundred] in the 60s that each design was made for less than a year. The transfer stencil outline has been hand-painted, and then over-glazed, so no two pieces are exactly the same.

The Arabia cups are for sale: $AU55/pair, as is the Kathie Winkle platter: $AU35. A fabulous ode to the 60s!

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Fuzzy Felt!

Fuzzy Felt Ballet & Play FarmFuzzy Felt Ballet & Play Farm
made in England 1964

One of my earliest memories is seeing Fuzzy Felt Bible Stories at Scripture class. I would have been 3 or 4. Even then I wanted to mix all the stories up and see what would happen if Jesus and Lazarus meet on Noah’s Ark. And what if the disciples and all the animals suddenly found themselves in King Solomon’s temple? Alas, it never happened as any attempts I made were neatly thwarted by the teacher.

And so- how I coveted Fuzzy Felt Bible Stories! I repeatedly asked Santa to bring it to me for Christmas [but apparently it was too expensive for Santa- the cheapskate!] Then for my 8th birthday- I was given Fuzzy Felt Ballet, and my younger sister got Fuzzy Felt Play Farm. I was very disappointed…it was too girly for me, although the black fuzzy felt board was kind of sophisticated. The Play Farm at least had heavy machinery, albeit picked out in two-dimensional felt.

So imagine my delight when I came across these two Fuzzy Felt sets! Oh the nostalgia! The memories of putting ballerinas on tractors and putting tutus on pigs! It all came flooding back. As did the blurb on the box:

“Gaily coloured felt shapes to make pictures! They cling like magic on the fuzzy board!”

Totally magical. The two sets are complete, with only a little minor wear to the black fuzzy felt board. For sale: $AU60

Have a fuzzy felt christmas!

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60s sunflowers [sold]

Ridgway Ironstone ‘Soleil’ platters
made in Stroke-on-Trent, England 1960s

Ironstone is a vitreous pottery first made in England in the late Eighteenth Century as a cheaper mass-produced alternative to porcelain. Ridgeway was in production in Stoke-on-Trent from 1790 to 1964; and these platters were one of the last productions of the pottery.

‘Soleil’ – as in Cirque du Soleil- as soleil means “sun” – is a sunflower motif. I love the broad, elongated shape of these platters emphasised with a border- with a pure circular inset with its abstract sunflowers. These platters would look great hung on a wall. Forget whacking food on them- this is 60s art at its best!

For sale: $AU45

Sellex bakelite canisters_kanga & roo salt and pepper shakers

Bakelite canisters & kanga & roo salt and pepper setSellex nested bakelite canisters, made in Australia c. 1940s
Kanga and Roo salt & pepper shakers, made in Japan c.1960s

These Sellex bakelite canisters ‘Rice’ and ‘Coffee’ have been separated from their red-lidded set [flour, tea and sugar…] but Kanga and Roo are in their entirety; Roo being the pepper, and Kanga – the salt. Roo pops out the pouch, should be in need of pepper.

I’m sure someone out there has the rest of the Sellex set – or at least wants to add to canisters already collected. The somewhat flowery transfer labels are a little worn, but it’s clear that more Rice was used than Coffee!

The ceramic kanga and roo S & P shaker set is adorable and in perfect condition.

For sale: $AUD85

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