Poole #60sstyle

Poole platter, serving dish and aperitif dish
made in England, 1960s.

Poole is a very well known pottery, which started operating in Dorset, England in 1873 – and continues today. I am particularly fond of the pottery produced between the 30s and 60s.

Poole is well known for its ‘Twintone’ pottery– their expression – a simple, stylish contrast of two colours. These three pieces are from the twintone series C104: sky blue & dove grey.

I have featured Poole before, and other twintone colourways – the elegant 50s and 60s styling and the deep pastel colours and very beautiful. Poole is very collectable, and there are many websites devoted to it’s fandom.

These three pieces are in excellent vintage condition, and are for sale: $AU75

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Calypso!

Broadhurst by Kathie Winkle ‘Calypso’ platter
made in England 1963

I am a huge Kathie Winkle fan: she produced over one hundred patterns for Broadhurst between 1958 and 1975. And it seems I’m not the only one: recently Kathie re-released several of the more popular patterns [see her website.]

However, these new releases are not handpainted, don’t have wonky registration of the transfer patterns, and look too – new and perfect. I much prefer the originals, and take great satisfaction from collecting them in the ‘wild’. So far, I have: Corinth [1967] Calypso [1963] Newlyn [1963] Tashkent, Kontiki [1965] Renaissance, Electra, Rushstone [1965] Michelle [1968] – and – Kimberley [1973.]

This is a fabulously large platter, ‘Calypso’. It was the pattern that my partner grew up with, in the 60s. I think she is starting to embrace it again- meanwhile- I think I love it anew.

And it’s for sale. Start your Kathie Winkle collection today! My ideal would be to have a place setting in six different patterns- fabulous! $AU35

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60s candlestick

Scheurich candlestick,
made in West Germany 1960s

By now you are all familiar with the term ‘fat lava’- the West German pottery that happened in the 60s and 70s that used crazy glazes, crazy shapes and crazy thick lava-esque patternings. Kinda grotesque at the time, but now much embraced and much celebrated.

Here is a more modestly coloured Scheurich candlestick. Although if orange wasn’t the colour of the 60s, I don’t know what was. And while Australians might call this a candle-holder; the European name for this device is a candlestick.

Like all Scheurich pottery, it has marks on the base: 255 /10. The first number is the pattern number, the second number is the height [in cm.] Those Scheurich potters!- so practical! I love the anti-gravity shape of the candlestick; and the colours of the candles I have teamed it with.

The candlestick has a tiny fleabite at the back, on the middle ring. I nearly didn’t buy it.  But it’s Scheurich, it’s fat lava, it’s a 60s candlestick! So, I have styled it with the fleabite to the back, and it is priced accordingly.

The Scheurich candlestick is for sale: $AU45